Skip to Content

Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2013–2014 and 2014–2015; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

 

Geological Sciences: GEO

GEO 380C. Advanced Structural Geology.

Origin of earth structures, solution of advanced structural problems, newest techniques, field techniques, and field problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 380F. Seismology II.

Basic seismology theory and its application to the study of the interior of the Earth (crust, mantle, and core), earthquakes, and plate tectonics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Mathematics 408C or the equivalent.

GEO 380G. Construction and Interpretation of 3-D Stratigraphy.

Uses three-dimensional volumes of basin-filling stratigraphy to explore how depositional landscapes are preserved in the sedimentary record and how sedimentary deposits can be analyzed to produce quantitative reconstructions of past environmental states. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 380J. Mathematical Methods in Geophysics.

Vectors and matrices, linear algebra, complex variables and contour integration, integral transforms, partial differential equations of geophysics (Laplace, Poisson, and acoustic wave equations), and simple solutions. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 366M and 380J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 380N. Sequence Stratigraphy.

Organization and interpretation of stratigraphic successions in time-bounded units of genetically related strata. Sequence stratigraphy, as a predictive branch of stratigraphic analysis, provides insight into the origin of the entire spectrum of siliciclastic, carbonate, and evaporite sediments from shallow to deep settings. Laboratory component involves the interpretation of sequences using outcrop measured sections, core data, wireline log sections, field trips, and 2D and 3D seismic data from modern and ancient settings. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 416M and 465K or their equivalents.

GEO 380P. Advanced Reservoir Characterization: Carbonates.

Advanced instruction in the integration of geologic and engineering methods for building 3-D reservoir models of carbonate reservoirs. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered in alternate years. Geological Sciences 380P and 391 (Topic: Advanced Reservoir Characteristics: Carbonates) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 380R. Dynamics of Sedimentary Systems I.

Explores the fundamental concepts of transport systems at the Earth's surface, focusing on principles and quantitative aspects of fluid flow, sediment transport, and bedforms, as well as atmospheric and oceanic circulation, complex systems, and the integration of small-scale processes in developing quantitative stratigraphic models. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 380S. Dynamics of Sedimentary Systems II.

Explores the fundamental concepts of transport systems at the Earth's surface, focusing on principles and quantitative aspects of fluid flow, sediment transport, and bedforms, as well as atmospheric and oceanic circulation, complex systems, and the integration of small-scale processes in developing quantitative stratigraphic models. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Geological Sciences 380R.

GEO 380T. Geoclimatology.

Examines climate records encoded in sedimentary archives through geologic time. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

GEO 381C. Structural Petrology.

Deformation processes from atomic to macroscopic level, resultant textures and fabrics, and conditions required to produce such deformation. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and an undergraduate course in structural geology and petrology.

GEO 381E. Brittle Structure.

Quantitative analysis of folding, faulting, and fracturing at all scales in the upper crust, with emphasis on cross-section construction, subsurface mapping, and fracture analysis. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, and several field trips. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and a course in structural geology.

GEO 381G. Geomicrobiology.

Geologic and hydrologic controls on subsurface microbial growth, metabolism, and community structure; the geochemical consequences of microbial processes in subsurface settings; and the influence of geology on microbial ecology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only, in alternate years. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Geological Sciences 341G and 381G may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 381K. Tectonic Problems.

Origin of regional structural features, complex and controversial structures; tectonic control of ore deposits. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of instructor.

GEO 381P. Plate Margins.

Study of the tectonics of the earth. Topics include history of early concepts, ocean spreading ridges and ophiolites, rifting, core complexes, passive margins, subduction zones, trenches, volcanic arcs, collisional orogenesis, and transform margins. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 381P and 391 (Topic: Plate Margins) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 381R. Regional Studies in Mineral Resources Geology.

Geologic evolution of a region, with emphasis on factors that control the origin of selected mineral resources. Study area varies according to the interests of participants and other factors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 381T. Marine Tectonics.

Tectonic processes within the dynamic Earth, with a focus on oceanic structures. Subjects may include fundamentals of plate tectonics; plate motion, driving forces, and mantle convection; evolution of triple junction and plate margins; plate reconstructions; earthquakes and focal mechanisms; structure and geochemistry of the Earth's interior; mantle structure and tomography; rheology and deformation mechanisms in mantle and crust; heat flow, gravity, the geoid, and paleomagnetism; hotspots and mantle plumes; seafloor spreading and oceanic spreading ridges; oceanic transform faults and fracture zones; and subduction zones, volcanic island arcs, and marginal seas. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 338T, 371C (Topic: Tectonics I), 381T, 391 (Topic: Tectonics I). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 382C. Groundwater Field Methods.

Basic field methods used in evaluation of groundwater conditions, with emphasis on field interpretation and on hands-on experience with geophysical, geochemical, stream-gauging, and pump test methods. Forty-five hours of field and laboratory work in a three-week period. Normally offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 391C or consent of instructor.

GEO 382D. Crustal Geofluids.

Designed to provide a technical foundation for exploring how fluids drive fundamental geologic processes in sedimentary basins. Includes characterizing pressure and stress in sedimentary basins, exploring the origin of overpressure through theory and characterization, and examining how pressure and stress couple. Problems include how sedimentation generates overpressure, how hydrocarbons are trapped in the subsurface, how mud volcanoes form, how submarine landslides are generated, and the origin of methane hydrates. Three lecture hours per week for one semester, with a four-day field trip to be arranged during spring break. Normally offered during the spring semester. Geological Sciences 382D and 391 (Topic: Crustal Fluids) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 382F. Fractured Rock Hydrology and Mechanics.

Introduction to the physics of flow in fractured rocks and soils; fracture mechanics; fracture skins; analysis of solute transport; and methods of characterizing and modeling fractured systems. Class field trips are an integral part of the class. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with field trips to be arranged. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of instructor. Previous coursework in hydrogeology (such as Geological Sciences 476K or the equivalent) and mathematics (such as Mathematics 427K or the equivalent) is recommended.

GEO 382G. Fluid Physics for Geologists.

Flow and transport phenomena within an earth science context. Includes extensive use of Maple, MATLAB, and COMSOL Multiphysics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences or graduate standing and consent of instructor; and Geological Sciences 346C or 391C, 383D or 383E, and Mathematics 408D, 408L, or 427K.

GEO 382M. Programming in FORTRAN and MATLAB.

FORTRAN for students without knowledge of a computer programming language: survey of all variable types, loops, arrays, subroutines, and functions; overview of UNIX and MATLAB. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 382M and 391 (Topic: Programming in FORTRAN and MATLAB) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Mathematics 408D or the equivalent.

GEO 382S. Physical Hydrology.

Comprehensive treatment of modern conceptual and methodological approaches to hydrological science. Combines qualitative understanding of hydrological processes with quantitative representation, approaches to measurement, and treatment of uncertainty. Major components of the hydrological cycle. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 382T. Continental Tectonics.

Tectonic processes, with a focus on continental lithospheric structures. Subjects may include convergent margins, subduction zones, magmatic arcs, and foreland structures; collisional orogenesis, arc-continent collisions, continent-continent collision, and mountain building; formation of supercontinents; uplift and exhumation; orogenic collapse and extensional tectonics; continental rifting and passive margins; transform margins; and the effect of tectonics on climate and oceanic circulation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 339T, 371C (Topic: Tectonics II), 382T, 391 (Topic: Tectonics II). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 382W. Hydrogeophysics.

Application of geophysical methods in hydrogeology. Modules include method theory and hydrogeological applications; using instruments in the field; and analysis of data, interpretation, and hydrogeological insights. Class discussions; field exercises and written field exercise summaries; individual and group reports. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with fieldwork hours to be arranged. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 371C (Topic: Hydrogeophysics), 376W, 382W, 391 (Topic: Hydrogeophysics). Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor; previous coursework and/or experience in hydrogeology and geophysics is recommended.

GEO 383. Clastic Depositional Systems.

River-, wave-, tide-, and gravity-driven processes are examined in modern depositional systems and considered in relation to sediment-flux, base-level, and autogenic changes. Application to the development of dynamic facies models and alluvial-shoreline-shelf-deepwater transitions in stratigraphic data. The equivalent of four lecture hours a week for one semester, including a four- to five-day field seminar. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 383C. Geology and Hydrology.

Study of the interaction of fluids with the rock matrix, with emphasis on the role of hydrology in geologic processes and the role of geology in affecting hydrologic processes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, and several field trips. Offered irregularly. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and a course in hydrogeology or hydrology.

GEO 383D. Numerical Methods I: Computational Methods in Geological Sciences.

A survey of geophysical data analysis methods, with a focus on time series, including sampling and aliasing, convolution and correlation, statistics, linear digital filters, properties and applications of the discrete Fourier transform, and least squares. Instruction in MATLAB and Fortran and solution of data analysis problems using these two languages. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 383E. Digital Methods in Hydrogeology.

Applications of mathematical software to earth science problems, with emphasis on hydrogeologic problems. Includes a brief introduction to numerical methods. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Geological Sciences 391C or the equivalent, and Mathematics 408D, 408L, or 427K.

GEO 383G. Geochemistry of Sedimentary Rocks.

The hydrologic cycle, the early diagenesis, carbonate sediments, chemical sediments, and burial processes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with laboratory hours to be arranged. Offered irregularly. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 383K. Paleoecology.

Relationships of fossil animals and plants to their environments and to the sedimentary deposits in which they occur. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with one optional field trip. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 383L. Petrography of Sandstones.

Interpretation of microscale features of sandstones to decipher the paleogeographic, tectonic, and postdepositional controls on sandstone composition and texture. Examines the effects of chemical and mechanical processes in the subsurface on sandstone properties, including porosity. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 383M. Petrology of Carbonates and Evaporites.

Description and interpretation of carbonate and evaporite rock deposition and paragenesis. Essentials of petrology; petrography, including identification of grain types, cement types, recrystallization, and dolomitization; and porosity evolution. Global geochemical signals in carbonate sediments, and geochemical processes of early and late diagenesis. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 383N. Depositional Systems: Carbonates and Evaporites.

Analysis of carbonate and evaporite depositional systems from sedimentary structures, faunal and ichnofaunal associations, grain types, vertical and lateral facies successions within time-significant packages, and sediment body geometries. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 383P. Potential Field Applications in Geophysics.

Introduction to the theory, measurement, and application of gravity and magnetic and electric fields to exploration and global-scale problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 365P and 383P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 383R. Reservoir Geology and Advanced Recovery.

Analysis of geologic controls on composition and architecture of oil and gas reservoirs, with emphasis on reservoir heterogeneity resulting from depositional and diagenetic processes. Geological and petrophysical determinants of fluid flows and behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and credit or registration for Geological Sciences 380N, 383, and 383N, or consent of instructor.

GEO 383S. Sedimentary Basin Analysis.

Quantitative and applied study of basin subsidence and sediment accumulation. The first half of the course considers theoretical basin evolution due to flexural, thermal, dynamic, and fault-related subsidence. The second half of the course involves in-depth analysis of selected basin systems and includes student research projects and presentations on assigned topics. Specific topics vary from year to year. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 383 or the equivalent.

GEO 383T. Tectonic and Climatic Interactions in Foreland Basins.

Integration of recent advances in the understanding of modern and ancient foreland basin sedimentation, quantitative basin modeling, regional and global climate change, and the geometry and kinematics of fold-thrust belts. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 384C. Seismology I.

Seismic, gravity, magnetic, electrical, and electromagnetic methods of exploration for petroleum and minerals. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 384D. Physics of Earth.

Geophysics of the whole Earth: seismic methods of inferring Earth structure, chemical makeup of Earth, tides and rotational variations, geomagnetism, heat flow, earthquakes, and seismicity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 354 and 384D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 384E. Seismic Migration and Inversion.

Use of the acoustic or elastic wave equation to construct subsurface images in seismic processing. Different methods of solution and data domains employed in routine applications. Investigates integral, implicit, and explicit finite differences and Fourier methods for the imaging and inversion of seismic reflection data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 384F. Computational Methods for Geophysics.

Numerical methods for solution of partial differential equations arising in continuum geophysics and geodynamics. Focuses on finite element methods and their application to heat conduction, viscous flow, wave propagation, and transport problems in geophysics. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 384F and 391 (Topic: Computational Methods for Geophysics) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 384G. Subsurface Mapping and Petroleum Workstations.

Introduction to basin analysis, subsurface mapping, and petroleum exploration using a workstation. Subjects may include common tectonic settings of petroleum basins, seismic stratigraphy, structural styles, and petroleum systems. Workstation techniques include well log editing, lithology interpretation, correlation of tectonic events, integration of seismic and subsurface well data, interpretation of two- and three-dimensional seismic reflection data and structure, and isopach and seismic attribute mapping. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 384G and 391 (Topic: Introduction to Petroleum Workstations) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 384M. Inverse Theory.

Vector spaces; model parameter estimation methods from inaccurate, insufficient, and inadequate measurements; linear, quasi-linear, and highly non-linear problems; local and global optimization methods. Emphasis on practical problem solving. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and knowledge of linear algebra, basic calculus, and statistics.

GEO 384N. Rock Physics.

Focuses on how rocks, pore fluids, and physical conditions of temperature, stress, diagenesis, and geological processes impact wave propagation, with an emphasis on how laboratory and theoretical results can be applied to field data. Presentation of case studies that outline strategies for seismic interpretation, site characterization, and recovery monitoring. Upscaling seismic and rock properties from the laboratory scale to borehole and reservoir scales. Multidisciplinary approaches to combination of geostatistical and stochastic methods, seismic-to-rock property transforms, and geologic information for reservoir characterization. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 384N and 391 (Topic: Rock Physics) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 384R. Geophysical Time Series Analysis.

Surveys the following topics in time series analysis with geophysical applications: Fourier transforms, linear digital filters and their design, frequency domain analysis methods (power and coherence spectrum estimation), least squares and related methods with time series applications. MATLAB is used extensively. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 325K or 383D or the equivalent.

GEO 384S. Seismic Reflection Processing.

Reduction of seismic and other geophysical data from field data to final geologic cross sections, using real data sets and commercial seismic processing software. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 384R or the equivalent.

GEO 384T. Seismic Lithology.

How seismic waves propagating through earth materials respond to relevant rock, reservoir, and fluid properties in the subsurface, and how seismic data recorded on the surface are used to describe, discriminate, and estimate these rock, reservoir, and fluid properties in the subsurface. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester. Geological Sciences 384T and 391 (Topic: Seismic Lithology and Exploration Geophysics) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 384U. Quantitative Seismic Interpretation.

Seismic inversion, a tool for reservoir characterization, post- and pre-stack modeling, rock physics and fluid replacement modeling, wavelet estimation and post-stack inversion, AVO and pre-stack inversion, multiattribute regression and neural network, and net pay estimation. Extensive hands-on training with three-dimensional seismic and well-log data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 384W. Seismic Imaging.

Seismic reflection imaging for visualizing the interior of Earth's upper crust. Study of fundamental imaging concepts from a unified geometrical point of view. Hands-on practical experience with imaging seismic data in an open-source software environment. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only, in alternate years. Geological Sciences 384W and 391 (Topic: Wavefield Imaging) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; programming experience and familiarity with seismology are helpful.

GEO 185G. Geophysics Colloquium.

Open to non-geological sciences majors, but registration priority is given to geological sciences majors. Exploration of a variety of problems in modern geophysics. Two lecture hours a week for one semester, and at least one weekend field trip. Geological Sciences 185G and 194 (Topic: Geophysics Colloquium) may not both be counted. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 385Q. Geomorphology Process and Form.

Explores how Earth surface processes combine to shape landscapes through erosion and deposition. Emphasis on open channel flow, sediment transport, fluvial and hillslope processes, and tectonic controls on landscape evolution. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with several field trips to be arranged. Normally offered in the fall semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 365Q, 371C (Topic: Geomorphology: Landscape Process, Form, and Evolution), 385Q, Geological Sciences 391 (Topic: Geomorphology: Landscape Process, Form, and Evolution). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 386. Metamorphic Petrology.

Metamorphism as a record of processes in the Earth's deep crust; phase equilibria among minerals and fluids at elevated temperatures and pressures; tectonometamorphic regimes; petrographic interpretation of metamorphic mineral assemblages and textures; and secular evolution of metamorphic patterns during Earth's history. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 386E. Economic Geology.

Origin of economic mineral concentrations within the context of their overall geologic settings; geologic aspects of economic evaluation, mining, and mineral processing; and mineral exploration. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 386G. Geographic Information System and Global Positioning System Applications in Earth Sciences.

Theory and practice of geographic information system (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies, and their applications to problems in earth sciences. Laboratories and field trips provide hands-on experience with the collection, mapping, and analysis of geologic and other field data using GPS equipment and GIS software. Topics include map projections; datums and reference frames; cartographic principles; remotely sensed data (satellite and aerial photos, image radar); vector- and raster-based image formats; geospatial data resources; GIS software applications; surveying principles; GPS constellation and data structure; differential GPS; data logging schemes; GPS postprocessing software; integration of GPS and GIS in mapmaking; extant GIS applications in geology and hydrogeology. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester, and two weekend field trips. Offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 386G and 391 (Topic: Geographic Information System and Global Positioning System Applications in Earth Sciences) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of instructor.

GEO 386K. Igneous Petrology.

Origin, differentiation, and crystallization of igneous rocks. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in alternate years. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 390M or the equivalent.

GEO 386R. Geology of Earth Resources.

Same as Energy and Earth Resources 396 (Topic 5: Geology of Earth Resources). Study of geologic, economic, societal, and environmental issues related to the production and consumption of energy, metal, industrial mineral, and water resources. Emphasizes the descriptive geology and origin of earth resources within the context of their overall geologic settings. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Energy and Earth Resources 396 (Topic: Geology of Earth Resources), 396 (Topic 5), Geological Sciences 386R, 391 (Topic: Geology of Earth Resources). May not be counted toward a graduate degree in geological sciences or petroleum engineering. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 386T. Topics in Volcanology.

Explores the physical and chemical processes involved in the eruption, transport, and deposition of volcanic material through the use and study of field measurements, fluid dynamics, petrology, and geophysical observations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester, in alternate years. Geological Sciences 386T and 391 (Topic: Volcanology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 387C. Chemical Hydrogeology.

Introduction to the chemistry of water in the subsurface. Topics include basic thermodynamics and kinetics of rock-water interaction, acid-base theory, redox, and coordination chemistry. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, a graduate course in hydrogeology, and two semesters of college chemistry.

GEO 387D. Climate Dynamics.

Studies features of the climate system and the basics of climate system dynamics. Subjects may include climate variability, radiation and heat budgets, atmospheric and ocean circulation systems, and the physics of climate change. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following maybe counted: Geological Sciences 371C (Topic: Climate System Science), 387D, 391 (Topic: Climate System Science). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and three semester hours of upper-division coursework in physics and multivariate calculus.

GEO 387E. Environmental Organic Geochemistry.

Environmental and organic chemistry of organic contaminants in groundwater and soils. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 387F. Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans.

Study of fluid dynamics as applied to the atmosphere and oceans, with an emphasis on large-scale processes. Subjects may include vorticity, instability, Ekman dynamics, thermohaline circulation, and waves in the atmosphere and oceans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 387F and 391 (Topic: Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans) may not both be counted. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Geological Sciences 387D or prior coursework in atmospheric dynamics, physical oceanography, or fluid dynamics.

GEO 387G. Climate System Modeling.

Studies the basic theory of climate system modeling using state-of-the-art regional climate models in a variety of applications. Subjects may include paleoclimate study and future climate prediction based on greenhouse gas increases. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following maybe counted: Geological Sciences 347G, 371C (Topic: Climate System Modeling), 387G, 391 (Topic: Climate System Modeling). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, basic knowledge of Unix, and programming experience in Fortran.

GEO 387H. Physical Climatology.

Investigates the nature of Earth's climate and examines the physical processes that maintain the climate system. Topics include the energy balance, the hydrological cycle, general atmosphere circulation, and how they all interact and vary at various spatial and temporal scales. Discusses human-induced modifications to the climate system, such as urbanization, anthropogenic global warming, desertification, and tropical deforestation. Focuses on descriptive, analytical, programming, and modeling skills. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Computer Science 303E, Geography 301K, Mathematics 408D, and Physics 303K.

GEO 387P. Climate System Physics.

Discussion of first-order principles and processes that govern the thermodynamical structure and energy distribution of the atmosphere, ocean, land, and cryosphere and their interaction with the dynamic aspect of the climate system. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 347P, 371C (Topic: Climate System Physics), 387P, 391 (Topic: Climate System Physics). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 388G. Global Biogeochemical Cycles.

Examination of the major reservoirs, fluxes, and processes controlling the distribution of biologically active chemical constituents of the earth. The importance of these biogeochemical cycles in the geologic past and the effects of human perturbation of these cycles. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 388G and 391 (Topic: Global Biogeochemical Cycles) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 388H. Environmental Isotope Geochemistry.

The application of the isotope and trace element geochemistry of natural waters and sediments to studies of the hydrologic cycle. Stable, radiogenic, and cosmogenic isotopes are used as tracers of the evolution of groundwater, surface water, and ocean water. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with laboratory hours to be arranged. Normally offered in the spring semester only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 388L. Isotope Geology.

Relation of isotope fractionation to earth processes; age determinations from ratios of unstable isotopes to daughter products; techniques of mass spectrometry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 388P. Paleontological Laboratory Techniques.

Overview and application of laboratory techniques used for in-depth investigation of the systematics of vertebrates. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 388P and 391 (Topic: Paleontological Laboratory Techniques) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 388R. Radiogenic Isotopes and Tectonic Processes.

Application of radiogenic isotopes to tectonic problems. Particular attention is given to methods and tools in thermochronology and geochronology for understanding thermal histories, uplift rates, slip rates, timing relationships, landform development, and provenance. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 388T. High-Temperature Geochemistry.

An introduction to the application of isotope and trace element geochemistry in the modern geological sciences, with emphasis on problems related to the origin and evolution of the Earth's interior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 389K. Paleontologic Nomenclature and Techniques.

Rules of nomenclature: preparation, illustration, and description of Paleozoic invertebrate fossils. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of instructor.

GEO 389M. Vertebrate Paleontology: Mammals.

Comparative osteology and phylogenetic history of the living and extinct mammals. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and Geological Sciences 389V.

GEO 389P. Digital Methods in Morphology.

The use of digital multimedia for analysis of paleontological problems, with emphasis on three-dimensional high-resolution CT data. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 389R. Morphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton.

Identification of skeletal elements from the major vertebrate taxa, and aspects of skeletal functional morphology, with emphasis on extant taxa. Topics include the skeletal systems of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only, in alternate years. Geological Sciences 322V and 389R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences; and Geological Sciences 404C, 405, or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.

GEO 389S. Systematics and Paleontology.

Seminar course focusing on current issues in digital/instructional technologies. Provides students with an opportunity to explore, discuss, and demonstrate issues designing, acquiring, manipulating, authoring, and publishing digital content. Students work toward completing a specific project. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered in alternate years. Geological Sciences 389S and 391 (Topic: Systematics and Paleontology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of instructor.

GEO 389V. Vertebrate Paleontology.

Comparative osteology and phylogenetic history of the living and extinct fishes, amphibians, and reptiles. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences, and Biology 349 or the equivalent.

GEO 390D. Seismology III.

Advanced treatment of elastic wave propagation in heterogeneous anisotropic media, vectors and tensors, Christoffel equation, group and phase velocities, invariant embedding (reflectivity), finite difference, finite elements, and spectral elements. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 380F or the equivalent.

GEO 390M. Thermodynamics of Geologic Processes.

Applications of physical chemistry to natural systems; interactions of minerals, solutions, and the atmosphere. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 390R. Analytical Methods: Electron-Microbeam Techniques.

An introduction to electron-microbeam instruments and their applications in the earth sciences. Lectures on relevant theory and concepts are supplemented by hands-on experience. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 390S. Analytical Methods: Mass Spectrometry.

An introduction to mass spectrometers and their applications in the earth sciences. Lectures on relevant theory and concepts are supplemented by hands-on experience. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 191, 291, 391, 491, 591, 791, 891, 991. Seminar in Geological Sciences.

For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one class hour a week for one semester; additional hours may be required for some topics. Offered irregularly. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences. Some topics require additional prerequisites; these are identified in the Course Schedule.

GEO 391C. Physical Hydrogeology.

Geological controls on groundwater resources; evaluation of aquifers, geothermal systems, and contamination problems; natural hazards caused by human use of groundwater. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with discussion hours to be arranged. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and concurrent enrollment in Geological Sciences 191W.

GEO 391D. Regional Tectonics.

Development of tectonic theory culminating in the new global tectonics, and application of theory to selected orogenic areas. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 391K. Applied Karst Hydrogeology.

The study of karst landforms, processes, flow systems, and water resources. Geologic controls, natural resources, aquifer recharge and discharge, system evolution, geochemistry/water quality, tracing methodologies, geophysical methods, and modeling are covered with an emphasis on collecting and interpreting field data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional fieldwork hours to be arranged. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 371C (Topic: Applied Karst Hydrogeology), 377K, 391 (Topic: Applied Karst Hydrogeology), 391K. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 391C or consent of instructor.

GEO 391Q. Topics in Quaternary Geology.

Interdisciplinary analysis of Quaternary chronology, environments, climatic changes, and erosional-depositional processes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 391S. Current Topics in Paleobiology.

Seminar reviewing recent publications on evolutionary and ecologic theories applied to the fossil record. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall and spring semesters, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 191W. Aquifer Testing.

Techniques of aquifer evaluation, including pumping tests, laboratory techniques, field mapping, and numerical analysis. Two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 191 (Topic: Aquifer Testing) and 191W may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and concurrent enrollment in Geological Sciences 391C or consent of instructor.

GEO 392M. Modern Geological Sciences.

General discussion of the entire spectrum of geological sciences. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 391 (Topic: Modern Geological Sciences) and 392M may not both be counted. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 193. Technical Sessions.

Attendance required of all graduate students in geological sciences. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Additional hours may be required. Normally offered in the fall and spring semesters only. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 194, 294, 394, 494, 594, 694, 794, 894, 994. Research in Geological Sciences.

Restricted to graduate students in geological sciences. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one class hour a week for one semester. Offered every semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences.

GEO 397F. Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course.

Hands-on, team-based instruction in the collection and processing of marine geological and geophysical data along the Gulf of Mexico coast. Includes classroom, laboratory, and field components in Austin and at sea. Offered between the spring semester and the summer session; limited class meetings may begin in the spring semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 348K, 397F, Marine Sciences 348 (Topic 2: Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course). Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

GEO 698. Thesis.

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Geological Sciences 698A.

GEO 398R. Master's Report.

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of the graduate adviser.

GEO 298T. Supervised Teaching in Geological Sciences.

Open to graduate students engaged in laboratory instruction under close supervision of the course instructors. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and appointment as a teaching assistant.

GEO 399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

GEO 399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 399R, 699R, or 999R.


What Starts Here Changes the World