Degree Requirements

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts Option I degree program offers a research-based curriculum and requires completion of thirty semester hours of coursework, including Economics 386C (Microeconomics I), 387C (Macroeconomics I), and Economics 698, Thesis. At least eighteen semester hours, including the thesis, must be in the major area, and at least six hours must be in supporting work. The Program of Work may include up to nine hours of upper-division undergraduate work, no more than six hours of which may be in either the major or the supporting work. The student must take at least twenty-one semester hours in economics and either six or nine hours of approved coursework outside economics. He or she must earn separate grade point averages in economics and in the supporting work of at least 3.00.

The Master of Arts Option III degree program is designed for students pursuing a terminal master's degree in economics. This program requires completion of thirty semester hours of coursework, including Economics 394K, Microeconomics, Economics 394L, Macroeconomics, and Economics 394M, Econometrics. The Program of Work may include approved graduate coursework within economics or approved substitutes. The student must earn a grade of at least C+ in each of the three required courses specified above. He or she must earn a grade point average of at least 3.00.

Master of Science in Economics

This degree program requires completion of at least thirty-six semester hours of coursework, including Economics 386C (Microeconomics I), 387C (Macroeconomics I), and 388C (Econometrics I). At least eighteen semester hours must be in the major area, and at least six hours must be in supporting work. The program may include no more than nine hours of upper-division undergraduate work, no more than six hours of which may be in either the major or the supporting work. In addition to the required courses listed above, the student must complete two courses in one of the areas of study offered by the department; he or she must also take either two courses in a second area or Economics 388D (Econometrics II). No more than six hours of work may be taken on the credit/no credit basis; neither the required courses nor the courses in the two areas may be taken on this basis. The student must earn separate grade point averages in economics and in the supporting work of at least 3.00.

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctoral degree is based on satisfactory performance in courses, examinations, writing requirements, and completion of a dissertation. The student seeking admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree is required to take eight core courses: Economics 386C (Microeconomics I), 387C (Macroeconomics I), 386D (Microeconomics II), 387D (Macroeconomics II), 385D (Mathematics for Economists), 388C (Econometrics I), 388D (Econometrics II), and 385C (Probability and Statistics). Comprehensive examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics are administered in June and August. In order to continue in the doctoral program, students must pass at least one comprehensive examination by the summer following their first year and both by the June examination date following their second year.

The student’s program must include at least twenty-four semester hours of approved coursework taken in residence. In addition to the core courses, the student must complete two graduate courses in each of two elective fields of specialization. The elective fields are designed to prepare students to write a single-authored second-year paper to be submitted at the June examination date. A departmental graduate research committee evaluates the second-year paper, provides the student with written feedback for revision, and makes a final pass/fail decision by the August examination date. Students must receive a passing grade on the second-year paper to continue in the doctoral program. In the third and subsequent years, students are required to take a writing seminar, Economics 387M, each semester in one of their fields and to make significant progress on their dissertation research. Students are expected to enter candidacy by the end of their fourth year. In general, three papers comprise a dissertation. A final oral defense completes the doctoral degree program.