Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2017–2018 and 2018–2019; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Sociology: SOC

SOC 180, 280, 380. Conference Course.

Sociological topics not otherwise offered at the graduate level. The equivalent of one, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit, but no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the Master of Arts and no more than twelve semester hours may be counted toward the doctoral degree. May not be substituted for required courses in statistics, methods, or theory, nor may more than one of the three other area requirements be fulfilled by Sociology 380. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor and the graduate adviser.

SOC 383K. Seminars in Social Psychology.

Substantive issues and current topics in social psychology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: History and Theories of Social Psychology. May be counted toward elective requirements.

SOC 384J. Special Topics in Social Statistics.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional laboratory hours may be required for some topics. Not all topics are offered every year. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Sociology 384L and 385L with a grade of at least B- in each.

SOC 384L. Social Statistics: Basic Concepts and Methods.

Review of descriptive statistics; probability concepts; statistical inference, bivariate correlation and regression, multiple regression, dummy variables, analysis of variance, analysis of covariance; applications of statistical computing packages to social science data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional laboratory hours to be arranged. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Required of all graduate students during their first semester of study. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 384M. Seminar in Data Analysis.

Quantitative sociological research integrating the use of statistical analysis with computer applications and survey data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Sociology 384L or the equivalent.

Topic 1: Evaluation of Social Policy. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement.

SOC 385K. Social Statistics: Discrete Multivariate Models.

Assumptions, estimation, testing, and parameter interpretation for models using categorical data; applications of statistical computing packages and programs to social science data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Sociology 384L or the equivalent.

SOC 385L. Social Statistics: Linear Models and Structural Equation Systems.

Model specification; review of simple regression; multiple regression in matrix form; ordinary and generalized least squares; recursive and nonrecursive structural equation models; measurement error and unobserved variables. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional laboratory hours to be arranged. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Sociology 384L or the equivalent.

SOC 386L. Social Statistics: Dynamic Models and Longitudinal Data Analysis.

Applications of dynamic models to data collected at successive points in time. Dynamic structural equation models; statistical time-series analysis; stochastic processes, panel, and event-history analysis. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Sociology 384L or the equivalent.

SOC 387C. Special Topics in Social Research Methods.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional laboratory hours may be required for some topics. Not all topics are offered every year. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Sociology 387J.

SOC 387J. Fundamentals of Research Methods.

Fundamental assumptions and procedures for conducting sociological research, including the logic of science, the links between theory and methods, measurement, experiments, sampling, surveys, qualitative methods, and ethics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Required of all graduate students during their first semester of study. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 387L. Qualitative Methods for the Social Sciences.

Qualitative survey research methods, approaches, and designs, including participant observational techniques, semistructured interviewing, and formal questionnaire and census-type surveys. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Sociology 387L and 387T may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 388J. Readings in Ethnography.

This reading-intensive seminar has four major objectives: 1) to become familiar with some classic and contemporary ethnographies, 2) to acquaint students with the methodological tenets of ethnography, 3) to consider theoretical and epistemological issues in ethnographic research, 4) to discuss narrative strategies in ethnographic writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement.

SOC 388K. Field and Observational Methods.

Rationale and logic for field research; participant and nonparticipant observation; informant and conversational interviewing; personal documents, records, and physical traces; life histories; sources of error and bias; personal and ethical dilemmas; modes of analysis. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 388L. Historical and Comparative Methods.

Scope and methods of historical and comparative sociology; application of historical sources to answer sociological questions; logic of comparative analysis in theory construction. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward either the statistics and methods requirement or the political sociology specialization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 389K. Seminars in Demography.

Substantive issues and current topics in population studies and social demography. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: General Approaches to the Study of Population. May be counted toward the demography specialization. Required for all students specializing in demography.
Topic 2: Human Fertility. May be counted toward either the demography specialization or the health specialization.
Topic 3: Human Mortality. May be counted toward either the demography specialization or the health specialization.
Topic 4: International Migration. Same as Latin American Studies 381 (Topic 1: International Migration). May be counted toward either the demography specialization or the race and ethnicity specialization in the sociology degree program.
Topic 6: Training Seminar in Demography. May be counted toward the demography specialization. Required for all students specializing in demography.
Topic 9: Immigration Policy. May be counted toward either the demography specialization or the race and ethnicity specialization.
Topic 11: Family and Household Demography. Trends in family behavior, theories about family change, and analytical techniques for studying families and households. May be counted toward either the demography specialization or the family specialization. Sociology 389K (Topic 11) and Women's and Gender Studies 393 (Topic: Family and Household Demography) may not both be counted.
Topic 12: Demography of Health and the Life Course. An in-depth introduction to the major conceptual frameworks and empirical research that examine distal and proximate social factors influencing adult health. Includes the assessment of key social and biological pathways linking social conditions at particular points in the life course with adult health outcomes. May be counted toward either the demography specialization or the health specialization.
Topic 13: Event History Analysis. Substantive issues and current topics in population studies and social demography. May be counted toward the demography specialization. Sociology 389K (Topic 13) and Statistics and Scientific Computation 385 (Topic: Event History Analysis) may not both be counted.

SOC 190K, 290K, 390K, 690K, 990K. Proposal Preparation.

Preparation of proposal for the doctoral dissertation. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, completion of all coursework, and consent of instructor.

SOC 391L. Basic Demographic Methods and Materials.

Population composition, change, and distribution; methods of standardizing and decomposing rates; life tables and population models; analysis of data from advanced and developing countries; applications of computer programs for demographic analysis. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward the statistics and methods requirement. Required of all students specializing in demography. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Sociology 384L or the equivalent.

SOC 394K. Seminars in Sociological Theory.

Development of social thought; the emergence of systematic sociological theory; interrelations with other social sciences. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Graduate students in sociology must take Topics 2 and 3. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 2: Contemporary Sociological Theory. May be counted toward the theory requirement. Required of all graduate students during their second semester of study.
Topic 3: Classical Sociological Theory. A review of classic works in sociological theory, focusing on the work of nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century theorists. Critically examines the historical and theoretical context of sociology's founding ideas. Explores the promises and problems of the relationship between sociological theory and the modern era. May be counted toward the theory requirement. Required of all graduate students during their first semester of study.
Topic 12: Sociology of Culture. An overview of some of the major contemporary research in the sociology of culture. Includes discussion of meaning systems and their transformations; symbolic nature of consumption; relationship between culture and social stratification; cultural bases of power; culture industry; and sociology of the arts. May be counted toward the theory requirement.
Topic 13: Cultural Studies. Examines the history, debates, and key developments within the trans-disciplinary field of cultural studies. Considers the significance of the intellectual work produced in Britain from the 1940s to the present and the relationship today between the sociology of culture and cultural sociology. May be counted toward the theory requirement.
Topic 14: Theories of Power. Examines the social theory controversy over the definition of the terms power and domination. Considers the classical and contemporary theoretical understandings of power and domination and studies the diverse ways in which these concepts have been deployed in empirical research. May be counted toward either the theory requirement or the political sociology specialization.

SOC 395E. Seminars in Education.

In-depth theoretical and policy discussions designed to give students intensive exposure to specific issues in education. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Sociology of Education. Provides an overview of the field of sociology of education. Examines the ways in which schools reproduce, reinforce, and challenge the prevailing social, economic, and political relationships in society. Includes discussions of why people go to schools, who has access, and the effects of schools on individuals, communities, and society. May be counted toward either the education specialization or the work, occupations, and organizations specialization.
Topic 2: Poverty, Race, and Schools. Focuses on children's academic outcomes within the contexts of poverty, race, and schools in K-12 education. Includes an assessment of a number of student groups in an effort to understand why some children have higher quality schooling experiences than others. Considers the roles of teachers and parents in affecting children's academic outcomes, with primary emphasis placed on their importance in elementary and middle school. May be counted toward either the education specialization or the race and ethnicity specialization. Sociology 396L (Topic: Poverty, Race, and Schools) and 395E (Topic 2) may not both be counted.
Topic 3: High School and Transition to Adulthood. Focuses on how education is related to adolescents' transition to adulthood in modern society. Examines the structure of schooling and the life course stages of adolescence and early adulthood, societal stratification, and intergenerational mobility. May be counted toward either the education specialization or the family specialization. Sociology 395E (Topic 3) and 396L (Topic: High School and Transition to Adulthood) may not both be counted.
Topic 4: International Issues in Education. Introduction to key theoretical and empirical work on education and social stratification from an international perspective. Focuses on studies of school access, educational attainment and achievement, and inequality of educational opportunity in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Includes discussion of comparative and case study readings that explore specific themes such as education and social mobility, gender, race and ethnicity, and school contexts. May be counted toward the education specialization.
Topic 5: Social Contexts of Education. Explores school as a social context by delving into the informal processes of education, such as socialization and the organization of social relations. Includes discussion of the school as a site of social relations, social psychological influences on educational trajectories, and the social psychological consequences of educational experiences. May be counted toward the education specialization. Sociology 396L (Topic: Social Context of Education) and 395E (Topic 5) may not both be counted.

SOC 395F. Seminars in Family.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Not all topics are offered every year. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 2: Marriage, Family, and Kinship. May be counted toward the family specialization.
Topic 3: Family and Health. May be counted toward the family and health specializations.
Topic 7: Aging and the Life Course. Concepts and controversies about aging and the adult life course in the United States. Includes discussion of the biology of aging as it relates to current social issues and trends, population aging and related demographic trends, the economics and politics of aging, the trajectories and transitions of the adult life course, healthy aging, age as a social status, health care rights and responsibilities, retirement as a social institution, generational equity, and the conditions and choices at the end of life. May be counted toward the family specialization.
Topic 8: Gender, Marital Status, and Well-Being. Examines gender and relationships from social psychological perspectives. Considers how and why intimate relationships differ for men and women as well as the gendered consequences of relationships for mental and physical health. May be counted toward the family specialization. Sociology 395F (Topic 8) and 395G (Topic: Gender, Marital Status, and Well-Being) may not both be counted.

SOC 395G. Seminars in Gender.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Not all topics are offered every year. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 3: Gender and Family. Review of basic theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence concerning gender and family relationships. Considers how and why family relationships differ for men and women as well as the gendered consequences of relationships for men's and women's well-being. Includes discussion of marital status, marital transitions, marital quality, same sex intimate relationships, cohabiting relationships, and parent/child relationships. May be counted toward either the gender specialization or the family specialization.
Topic 4: Gender and Health. May be counted toward the gender and health specializations.
Topic 5: Gender and Development. May be counted toward the gender and development specializations.
Topic 6: Gender and Work. Examines theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Includes discussion of changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, as well as gender differences in career processes. May be counted toward either the gender specialization or the work, occupations, and organizations specialization.
Topic 7: Feminist Theory. Examines social categories such as the state, citizenship, nationalism, and globalization from a feminist perspective. May be counted toward either the gender specialization or the theory specialization. Sociology 394K (Topic: Feminist Theory) and 395G (Topic 7) may not both be counted.
Topic 8: Readings in Gender and Sexuality. Presents an overview of sociological theories of sexuality and provides a forum for discussion of recently published works in the sociology of gender and sexuality. May be counted toward the gender specialization.
Topic 9: Gender and Society. Examines the social construction of gender inequality, paying special attention to how divisions by race, class, and sexuality contribute to and occasionally undercut men's power and privilege over women. Emphasis is also placed on moments of resistance and change in gender arrangements. May be counted toward the gender specialization.
Topic 10: Sociology of Sexual Violence. Examines the different social forces and dynamics responsible for a variety of expressions of sexual violence existing in contemporary society. Designed to examine these processes promoting social violence from feminist-informed sociological perspectives; explore and analyze the historical, economic, and socio-cultural contexts responsible for these processes; study the issues and concerns with regard (but not limited) to gender, race and ethnicity, class, sexuality, and political activism associated with sexual violence research in the social sciences; and discuss and critique published sexual violence research based on qualitative methodologies across disciplines. May be counted toward the gender specialization.
Topic 11: Qualitative Methods and Sexuality Research. Examines major qualitative approaches to the study of sexuality from a sociological perspective; issues and concerns with regard to gender, race and ethnicity, class, same-gender sexualities, and activism associated with sexuality research in the social sciences; and published sexuality research based on qualitative methodologies. May be counted toward either the gender specialization or the statistics and methods requirement.
Topic 12: Women and the Changing World of Work. Explores the nature and causes of gender stratification in industrial societies. Examines theoretical and empirical issues regarding gender inequality in the labor market. Includes changes in female labor force participation, gender segregation in the workplace, gender gaps in earnings and promotions, and gender differences in career processes. Addresses how social institutions that vary from one country to another shape men's and women's economic opportunities and the degree of gender inequality in the society. May be counted toward the gender specialization and the work, occupations and organizations specialization in the sociology department. Only one of the following may be counted: Public Affairs 388K (Topic: Women and the Changing World of Work), Social Work 395K (Topic: Women and the Changing World of Work), Sociology 395G (Topic: Women and the Changing World of Work), 395G (Topic 12), Women's and Gender Studies 393 (Topic: Women and the Changing World of Work).

SOC 395J. Seminars in Health.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Not all topics are offered every year. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Sociology of Health and Illness. May be counted toward the health specialization.
Topic 6: Sociology of Mental Health. Examines the social causes of mental health. Explores what mental health and mental illness are and how they can be measured, contrasting the social view with the medical, psychiatric, and psychological views. May be counted toward the health specialization.
Topic 7: Health and the Life Course. Health across the life course; the timing and sequencing of life-course experiences and events with respect to health. May be counted toward either the health specialization or the demography specialization.
Topic 8: Biosocial Approaches to Health. Examines the relationships between the natural and social environments and human health and behavior. Explains how disease, functional problems, and disability are not simply biomedical problems but are reflective of a complex array of behavioral factors and social forces. Focuses on the biologically informed sociological models of health in order to understand how genetics and major biological systems interact with social conditions and experiences to influence health and health-related behaviors. May be counted toward either the health specialization or the demography specialization.
Topic 10: Structural Equations Modeling of Health and the Life Course. May be counted toward the health specialization.
Topic 12: Education, Socioeconomic Status, and Health. Examines why people with higher socioeconomic status have better health than lower status individuals. Explores the links between aspects of social status and health and how education influences health in ways that are varied, present at all stages of adult life, cumulative, self-amplifying, and uniformly positive. May be counted toward the health specialization.
Topic 13: Gender, Health, and Society. Focuses on the gender dimensions of health, illness, and the medical care industry in the United States, with some international comparisons. Examines the role of women as major actors in changing the health-care system, reducing health risks for themselves and their families, and their roles as health-care providers, public administrators, and leaders in the health-care establishment. Also examines the role of different levels and branches of government and the relative power of key nongovernmental actors and the media in the formation of public policy and the definition and framing of our health agenda. May be counted toward either the health specialization or the gender specialization.

SOC 395L. Seminars in Race and Ethnicity.

Sociological theories and findings concerning various aspects of race and ethnicity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Comparative Perspectives in Race and Ethnicity. May be counted toward the race and ethnicity specialization.
Topic 8: Race, Media, and Culture. May be counted toward the race and ethnicity specialization.
Topic 9: Race and the Body. Explores theories and research methodologies in the sociological study of the body, with a focus on race, racism, gender, and sexualities. May be counted toward either the race and ethnicity specialization or the theory specialization.
Topic 10: Critical Theories of Race and Racism. Introduction to global perspectives on race, ethnicity, and racism. Examines the historical relationship between the emergence of ideas about race and Western modernity: importance of slavery and European colonialism in producing modern understandings of race and racial difference; contemporary racial formation in the period after the anticolonial struggles of the mid-twentieth century. May be counted toward the race and ethnicity specialization or the theory specialization. Sociology 394K (Topic: Critical Theories on Race and Racism) and 395L (Topic 10) may not both be counted.

SOC 396L. Seminars in Work, Occupations, and Organizations.

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 10: Stratification and Social Mobility. May be counted toward the work, occupations, and organizations specialization.
Topic 15: Nongovernmental Organizations in the Developing World. Explores how nongovernmental organizations reflect local and international initiatives related to human rights, the environment, sustainable development, health, education, and much more. May be counted toward the work, occupations, and organizations specialization.
Topic 16: Sociology of Poverty in the United States. Review of selected sociological literature on poverty and related aspects of inequality, mostly in the United States but with some comparisons made with other developed nations. Both quantitative and qualitative research on American poverty are considered. May be counted toward the work, occupations, and organizations specialization.
Topic 17: Entrepreneurship and Incubation. May be counted toward the work, occupations, and organizations specialization.

SOC 396N. Seminars in Crime, Law, and Deviance.

Substantive issues and current topics in the study of crime, law, and deviance. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Criminology. Examines major topics in the social scientific study of crime, including the measurement of crime, profiles of criminals, criminal behavior across the life course, and public perceptions of and reactions to crime. May be counted toward the crime, law and deviance specialization.
Topic 2: Theories of Crime Causation. Focuses on the major theories of criminal behavior and whether and in what ways empirical data support or refute various theoretical perspectives. May be counted toward the crime, law, and deviance specialization.
Topic 3: Criminal Justice. Designed to provide an overview of research on how the penal system works in practice by examining the empirical literature on sentencing, prisons, recidivism, and evaluation research of penal programs. May be counted toward the crime, law, and deviance specialization.
Topic 4: Introduction to Law and Society. Focuses on the noncrime aspects of the legal system, especially civil justice; the pursuit of perceived legal entitlements and grievances; studies of legal professionals and legal decision makers; and the use of the legal system to advance social change. May be counted toward the crime, law, and deviance specialization.
Topic 5: Law, Legitimacy, and Control. Explores the interconnections between law, morality, and the sense of injustice. Examines the attributes of a moral system as they influence the collective assessment of legitimacy, the emergence of social movements for reform, and the resulting efficacy of law as an instrument of control. May be counted toward either the crime, law, and deviance specialization or the political sociology specialization.
Topic 6: Deviance. Examines the characteristics, causes of, and societal reactions to several types of deviant behavior. May be counted toward the crime, law, and deviance specialization.

SOC 396P. Seminars in Political Sociology, Development, and Globalization.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Topic 1: Political Sociology. May be counted toward the political sociology specialization.
Topic 2: Social Movements. May be counted toward the political sociology specialization.
Topic 3: Social Change. May be counted toward the political sociology specialization.
Topic 6: Elites. Same as Government 390L (Topic 10: Elites). May be counted toward the political sociology specialization in the sociology degree program.
Topic 7: Peace, Conflict, and Violence. May be counted toward the political sociology specialization.
Topic 8: Cultural Sociology. May be counted toward the political sociology and religion specializations.
Topic 9: Economic Development and Social Change. May be counted toward the political sociology, development, and globalization specialization. Sociology 395D (Topic 1) and 396P (Topic 9) may not both be counted.
Topic 10: Introduction to the Sociology of Latin America. Same as Latin American Studies 381 (Topic 14). Only one of the following may be counted: Latin American Studies 381 (Topic 14), Sociology 395D (Topic 2), 396P (Topic 10). May be counted toward the political sociology/development and globalization specialization in the sociology degree program.
Topic 11: Mexican Political System in Transition. May be counted toward the political sociology, development and globalization specialization. Sociology 395D (Topic 3) and 396P (Topic 11) may not both be counted.
Topic 12: Gender and Politics. Provides a comprehensive introduction to the history of women's entry into politics internationally, the current state of women's political representation across countries and regions, and contemporary debates on why and how women's access to political power varies across countries. May include discussion of the ways in which gender intersects with other social identities, such as race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. May be counted toward either the political sociology specialization or the gender specialization.
Topic 13: Housing Practices and Public Policy in Latin America. Same as Latin American Studies 381 (Topic 6). May be counted toward the political sociology, development and globalization specialization in the sociology degree program. Only one of the following may be counted: Sociology 395D (Topic 5), 396P (Topic 13), Latin American Studies 381 (Topic 6).
Topic 14: Citizenship and Social Policy. May be counted toward the political sociology, development and globalization specialization. Sociology 395D (Topic 7) and 396P (Topic 14) may not both be counted.
Topic 15: Economic Sociology. May be counted toward the political sociology, development and globalization specialization. Sociology 395D (Topic 8) and 396P (Topic 15) may not both be counted.
Topic 16: Urbanization. May be counted toward the political sociology, development and globalization specialization. Sociology 395D (Topic 9) and 396P (Topic 16) may not both be counted.
Topic 17: Poverty and Marginality in the Americas. Same as Latin American Studies 381 (Topic 23). Review of the past and present ethnographic analyses of the nature and experiences of poverty and marginality in Latin America and in the United States. Examines some of the most controversial issues and debates, and explores emerging research topics north and south of the border. May be counted toward the sociology department's political sociology, development and globalization specialization in the sociology degree program. Only one of the following may be counted: Latin American Studies 381 (Topic: Poverty and Marginality in the Americas), 381 (Topic 23), Sociology 395D (Topic: Poverty and Marginality in the Americas), 396P (Topic 17).
Topic 18: Social Capital and Social Networks. Same as Radio-Television-Film 380G (Topic 2). Explores theories, methods, and applications, drawing on literatures from sociology, communication, media studies, and management. Examines the relational and structural embeddedness of actors, communities, and organizations, and focuses on how to collect network data and do network analysis. May be counted toward the political sociology, development and globalization specialization in the sociology degree program. Only one of the following may be counted: Radio-Television-Film 380G (Topic: Social Capital and Social Networks), 380G (Topic 2), Sociology 396P (Topic: Social Capital and Social Networks), 396P (Topic 18).
Topic 19: Bourdieu and the Craft of Sociology. Examines Bourdieu's key notions as they become articulated in the craft of research and writing in his work, and that of others, with an underlying objective of learning how to think and conduct sociological research with or against Bourdieu. May be counted toward the political sociology, development and globalization specialization. Sociology 396P (Topic: The Uses of Theory: Bourdieu and the Craft of Sociology) and 396P (Topic 19) may not both be counted.
Topic 20: Prosocial Behavior. Instruction steers away from traditional focus of sociology and considers pro-social behavior - actions intended to help or benefit others. Similar to the "positive psychology" movement, which asks what makes individuals resilient and happy rather than abnormal or depressed, examines what makes individuals, groups, and communities sacrifice, trust, volunteer, and generally work together. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Sociology 396P (Topic: Prosocial Behavior) and 396P (Topic 20) may not both be counted.

SOC 396Q. Seminars in Law and Human Rights.

Theory and research on those instances in which legal regimes and/or legal institutions, such as prisons, raise human rights issues. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 397D. Publishing Papers in Sociology.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be counted toward elective requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 397P. Proseminar.

A review of the requirements and responsibilities of professional sociologists. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in sociology.

SOC 698. Thesis.

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in sociology, twelve semester hours of graduate coursework in sociology, and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Sociology 698A.

SOC 398T. Supervised Teaching in Sociology.

Teaching under the close supervision of the course instructor for two semesters; weekly group meetings with the instructor, individual consultations, and reports throughout the teaching period. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SOC 399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

SOC 399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Sociology 399R, 699R, or 999R.