Graduate Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2017–2018 and 2018–2019; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

Nursing: N

N 280C. Psychopharmacology for Advanced Practice Nurses.

Covers prescribing and monitoring medications commonly used with patients who have psychiatric or mental health problems. Two lecture hours per week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Nursing 395C, 396C, 396J, and 196K, or consent of instructor.

N 280D. Family Care Concepts in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

Covers psychiatric-mental health nursing care for families with complex relational problems in various clinical settings. Application of theoretical, ethical, and evidence-based practices to formulate delivery of culturally sensitive care within the community context. Covers common practices and treatment protocols, with emphasis on critical thinking skills inherent to the role of the PMHNP. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing; and Nursing 392E, 392Q, 396C, 396J, or consent of instructor.

N 280E. Role of the Family Psychiatric and Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

Focuses on legal, political, and ethical issues affecting the family psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing.

N 380F. Advanced Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing I.

Studies the theory and evidence bases for diagnosis and management of a variety of common psychiatric and behavioral disorders. Emphasizes diagnostic reasoning, clinical decision-making, and therapeutic strategies appropriate for the role of the family psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner. Considers the sociocultural and community context for patient care. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing, and consent of instructor or one of the following: Nursing 392E, 392Q, 395C, 396C, 396J; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 380G; credit or registration for Nursing 180C.

N 380G. Advanced Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing I: Clinical.

A precepted, clinical environment in which to apply knowledge related to biological and psychosocial theories, pharmacology, health promotion, and ethics to patients and families with common psychiatric and behavioral disorders. Emphasis is placed on role development using standardized procedures and tools that assist in diagnosis, treatment, and developing beginning-level therapy skills in multiple modalities. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing, and consent of instructor or one of the following: Nursing 380D, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 380F, credit or registration for Nursing 180C.

N 280H. Advanced Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing II.

In-depth focus on the role of the family psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner using theoretical bases for care of complex psychiatric and mental health patients with psychopathology in a variety of settings across the life span. Students integrate various biological and psychosocial theories with psychopharmacology, health promotion, and ethical decision-making to develop culturally sensitive care. Emphasizes evidenced-based practices, recommended practices and treatment protocols, ethical decision making, and critical thinking strategies that are integral to the role of the family psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner. Two lecture hours per week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing; and Nursing 380F and 380G, and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 480J, or consent of instructor.

N 480J. Advanced Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing II: Clinical.

Studies the role of the advanced psychiatric and mental health nurse practitioner in providing care for patients and families with complex psychopathology and psychiatric and mental health problems in a variety of clinical settings. Knowledge from biological and psychosocial theories, psychopharmacology, health promotion, and ethics to develop culturally sensitive care. Emphasizes role development, evidenced-based practices, recommended practices and treatment protocols, ethical decision making, and critical thinking strategies. Sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing; and Nursing 380F and 380G, and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 380H, or consent of instructor.

N 380L. Theory Development in Nursing.

Introduction to the nature of scientific explanation and inquiry. Critique of theoretical conceptualization in nursing. Examination of strategies for theory development. Analysis of the role of theory in nursing as a practice discipline. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Required of all doctoral students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 380M. Historical and Philosophical Study of Nursing.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Philosophical Aspects of Nursing. Introduction to the analysis of nursing language: defining terms, detecting logical fallacies, analyzing meanings, and recognizing descriptive and normative aspects of judgments.
Topic 2: Historical Development of Nursing. In-depth study of the history of nursing, with emphasis on influences on the profession and changes that have occurred within it. Review of the association of nursing with related disciplines, its emergence into institutions of higher learning, organizational structure and hierarchy, changes in educational focus resulting from the preparation of educational leaders, and related topics.
Topic 3: Philosophy of Nursing Theory. Advanced seminar in the application of philosophical aspects of nursing theory. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 380L.
Topic 4: Philosophical and Theoretical Bases of Nursing Science. Philosophical principles and theories that contribute to the ongoing evolution of nursing science. Explores the historical development of nursing as a professional discipline in the context of philosophy and science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 397L (Topic 4: Critical Review of the Literature).

N 480Q. Psychiatric Assessment and Psychotherapy Skills.

Introduces psychiatric-mental health assessment of individuals and families throughout the life span, using established therapeutic communication techniques, individual psychotherapeutic modalities, and psychotherapy skills from evidence-based practices. Covers synthesis of theories and knowledge from nursing, biology, psychiatry, psychology, and socio-cultural studies as they apply to the comprehensive assessment of psychiatric clients. Focus on assessment and psychotherapy skills commensurate with the role of the PMHNP through didactic, experiential and observational practice in the classroom. Three and one half lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395C, 396C, 396J, and 196K, or consent of instructor.

N 480T. PMHNP: Management of Chronic Illness.

Analysis and application of physiological, psychosocial, spiritual, and environmental concepts to treat selected patients with chronic illness. Focus on dynamics of chronic illness and related psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner roles. Explores concepts relevant to the management of complex and chronic health care problems often comorbid with psychiatric illness. Includes supervised instruction in clinical agencies. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 396C, 396J, 395C, 280C, and 480Q; or consent of instructor.

N 380U. Spanish for Health Care Professionals.

Basic medical Spanish language skills and phrases related to assessment and nursing activities. Focus on the cultural values of Latino patients who seek health care in the United States. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 281C. Health Informatics.

Information and communication technologies are increasingly being applied to the healthcare context, with many new jobs opening up in areas such as health information management, electronic health records, and consumer and public health informatics. Explores the challenges and career opportunities provided by these recent developments. Discusses major issues-social, cultural, political, economic, technological, historical, and ethical-associated with health informatics. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 381D. Leadership Development for Healthcare Professionals.

Examines leader-follower partnerships in diverse healthcare settings. Uses theories, research findings, and expert opinions from several fields of study to explore the related concepts of power, authority, influence, leadership, followership, decisional involvement, structural empowerment, and emotional intelligence in the context of complex healthcare work environments. Special emphasis is placed on the use of effective leadership and followership behaviors to sustain high performing interprofessional teams and improve quality outcomes for patients, families, and healthcare organizations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

N 381M. Adult Health Nursing.

The equivalent of three class hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Theoretical Foundations in Adult Health (Adult Health I). Theoretical underpinnings for research in adult health nursing. Analysis of theories related to person, health, and environment for their applicability to adult health nursing. Nursing 381M (Topic 1) and (Topic 5) may not both be counted.
Topic 2: Substantive Areas in Adult Health (Adult Health II). Overview of nursing issues, psychosocial and physiological concepts, and research findings related to health promotion and health care needs of adults. Designed to help students develop the conceptual component of the dissertation research. Nursing 381M (Topic 2) and 397L (Topic 4: Critical Review of the Literature) may not both be counted.
Topic 3: Research in Adult Health (Adult Health III). Application of methodology and theory development to research studies in adult health, with emphasis on analysis and development of methods for research in adult health nursing. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 381M (Topic 1 or Topic 2) and 397L.
Topic 4: Advanced Dissertation Seminar (Adult Health IV). Structured reference group for discussion of theoretical and methodological aspects of the dissertation research process. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 380L, 381M (Topic 1), 381M (Topic 2), 381M (Topic 3), and 397K.
Topic 5: Theories of Health Behavior. The theoretical underpinnings for research related to health behaviors and health behavior change for individuals, groups, or systems. Nursing 381M (Topic 1) and 381M (Topic 5) may not both be counted. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 380M (Topic 4: Philosophical and Theoretical Bases of Nursing Science).

N 381R. Theoretical Foundations of Aging.

Theories in gerontology as applied to nursing practice. Two and one-half lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 381S. Gerontological Nursing.

Physiological changes in the elderly, and their implications for nursing practice. Two lecture hours and four and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 381R.

N 281V. Leadership in Diverse Settings Advanced Nursing Practicum.

Precepted practicum focusing on advanced nursing concepts and skills in a setting selected with consideration of the student's interest, needs, goals, and objectives. Assessments of individuals, families, or groups, and their environments, implementation of appropriate evidence-based specialized nursing interventions, and evaluation the role of master's prepared nurses in diverse practice settings. Eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 396C, 396J, and credit or registration for Nursing 392Q and 395C; or consent of instructor.

N 281W. Leadership in Diverse Settings Advanced Nursing Capstone Practicum.

Focuses on program evaluation, policy implications and analysis, and development of leadership in diverse settings. Eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 281V.

N 382. Sociocultural Influences on Health.

Focuses on factors associated with health status, health care, and health policies. Using an ecological approach, the course explores relationships among individual characteristics such as gender, education, income, literacy, race, ethnicity, culture, acculturation, disability, age, and sexual orientation; interpersonal factors such as communication with health care providers, family and social ties, and discrimination; and societal-level factors such as neighborhood and community context, health care organizations, economics, politics and policies and seeks to understand how those factors shape health behaviors, access to health care services, and health status locally, nationally, and globally. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 382H. Health Care Delivery.

Overview of the health care delivery system in the United States--its definition, characteristics, and components. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 382W. Informatics for Healthcare Professionals.

Explores subjects of health informatics that are specifically focused to healthcare professionals. Representative subjects include: key roles and responsibilities of health informaticians in American healthcare system; Informatics related theoretical foundations, research needs assessment and available information sources on EBP; Applications of health informatics by healthcare professionals (HCPs) in clinical settings; Implementation and evaluation of health informatics applications in clinical settings; Human-computer interaction (HCI), usability and ethical challenges and issues faced by HCPs; and new trends in health informatics technology to engage patients. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nursing 395 (Topic: Health Informatics) and 382W may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 284C. Professional Nursing Foundations.

Introduction to fundamental nursing care concepts, processes, and skills, including communication and assessment. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission to the alternate entry MSN program.

N 384D. Conceptual Foundations of Nursing.

Life-span, health-related phenomena and concepts essential to effective nursing practice with multiple levels of clients. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission to the alternate entry MSN program.

N 484E. Nursing Responses to Physiological Alterations in Health.

Discussion of physiological alterations across the life span and of the nursing measures indicated to restore and maintain health. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 484C.

N 484F. Adult Health Nursing I.

Discussion and application of concepts and theories necessary to promote and restore the health of adults with biological problems and related physiological and psychological responses. One and one-half lecture hours, two hours of skills laboratory, and eight hours of clinical work a week for one semester. Nursing 484F and 387F may not both be counted. Nursing 484F and 390F may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission to the alternate entry MSN program.

N 484G. Conceptual Bases of Mental Health Nursing.

Current perspectives on the etiology, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals, families, and groups; clinical application of pertinent nursing care. Two and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484G and 287G may not both be counted. Nursing 484G and 290G may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission to the alternate entry MSN program.

N 484H. Nursing Care of Childbearing and Childrearing Families.

Concepts, theories, and processes essential to understanding the health concepts and nursing care of families during the childbearing and childrearing years. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484H and 287H may not both be counted. Nursing 484H and 290H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 384D, 484E, 484F, and 484G.

N 384J. Nursing Care of Childbearing and Childrearing Families Practicum.

Clinical application of concepts, theories, processes, and skills pertinent to the care of families during the childbearing and childrearing years. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nursing 384J and 287J may not both be counted. Nursing 384J and 290J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 384D, 484E, 484F, and 484G; and credit or registration for Nursing 484H.

N 284N. Genomic Applications in Nursing.

The ethical, legal, psychological, and social issues involved in the integration of genetic information into nursing practice. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission to the alternate entry MSN program.

N 284P. Aging and Disability.

Examines concepts and theories of aging and disability. Addresses the changing physical, psychological, social, economic, ethical, legal, and spiritual needs, environmental accommodations, and caregiver responsibilities and needs across the life course. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and admission to the alternate entry MSN program.

N 484R. Adult Health Nursing II.

Discussion and application of core concepts, including nursing management, jurisprudence, and rehabilitation. Studies theories that can be used to promote and restore health of adults with biological problems and related physiological responses. Two lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484R and 387R may not both be counted. Nursing 484R and 290R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 384D, 484E, 484F, and 484G.

N 484S. Integration of Clinical Nursing Knowledge.

Integration of nursing knowledge derived from didactic and clinical courses with application in the care of clients across the life span and in a variety of settings. One lecture hour and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484S and 187S may not both be counted. Nursing 484S and 290S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and Nursing 484H, 384J, and 484R.

N 284T. Professional Nursing Management.

Examines selected concepts and theories of nursing leadership and management in the context of the nursing work environment and professional nursing career development. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F, 387R, 390F; and credit or registration for Nursing 187S, 290G, 290H, 290J, 290Q, and 290R.

N 385R. Community Mental Health and Wellness.

Concepts, theories, and research on the mental health and wellness of individuals, groups, and families living and working in communities. Principles of preventive health care form a philosophical framework within which students analyze, evaluate, and synthesize the concepts and theories used to promote the health and welfare of people in the community. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 385S. Advanced Theory and Research in Mental Health.

Analysis, development, and testing of theories and conceptual models of mental health and illness; examination of relationships among stress, response to traumatic events, and mental health of the individual, family, and groups. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 386C. Computers in Nursing.

Development of competence in computer use and in the application of computer-based techniques to nursing problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 386E. Evidence-Based Practice and Outcomes in Health Care.

Theories of evidence-based practice are used to examine complex nursing decision-making activities in clinical and administrative health care settings. Students appraise the health care literature to evaluate the evidence for implementation of change protocols and apply their learning to clinical and administrative decisions about effecting change to deliver patient-centered care. Review of various methods of dissemination of evidence-based practice and outcomes data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For students in the Master of Science in Nursing program, graduate standing and either Nursing 392 and 392E or consent of instructor; for alternate entry students, graduate standing and either Nursing 384D and 392E or consent of instructor.

N 486F. Budget and Finance in Health Care.

Conceptual and practical applications of financial management, cost analyses, and budgeting in the contemporary health care delivery system. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 386H. Overview of Healthcare System.

Designed to provide an extensive overview of the U.S. healthcare system. Topics include historical underpinnings, current trends, contemporary issues, and strategies for delivering healthcare in a variety of settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 386M. Administrative Decision Making in Nursing Systems.

Theories of nursing, economics, management science, and decision analysis are used to examine strategic and operational decision activities in the administration of nursing systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 386P. Practicum in Administrative Decision Making.

Guided field experience to examine information management and complex decision problems in the administration of nursing systems. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 386M.

N 386Q. Quality and Safety in Healthcare.

Examination of quality and safety in the U.S. healthcare system based on quantitative and qualitative research findings, expert opinions, and cultural surveys. Explores and evaluates strategies for creating and sustaining a culture of safety in healthcare. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 386R. Nursing Systems: Theory and Research.

Advanced study of theories and research related to nursing systems of care and patient aggregates within organized settings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 386S. Health Care Systems Outcomes.

Theoretical and methodological issues related to the study of outcomes of nursing systems of care, including patient, staff, organization, and community health outcomes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 686V. Internship in Administration of Nursing Systems.

Analysis and implementation of advanced nursing administrative roles. Synthesis of knowledge and skill in designing, implementing, and evaluating nursing system programs. One lecture hour a week for one semester, and twenty hours of fieldwork a week in a health care agency. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 386K, 386M, and 386P.

N 387. Best Practices in Clinical Teaching.

Designed to prepare nurse educators to manage a group of nursing students in a variety of clinical settings. Applies learning theory to specific teaching strategies designed to prepare students for clinical practice. Explores methods for evaluating learning outcomes. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 387C or consent of instructor.

N 387C. Conceptual Foundations of Nursing Education.

Designed to introduce the student to the essential elements of nursing education. Critical elements include the theoretical bases of teaching and learning, curriculum development, and assessment and evaluation strategies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 387F. Adult Health Nursing I.

Introduction to concepts, theories, and research findings essential for promoting and restoring the health of adults with selected commonly occurring physiological alterations and responses to health and illness. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484F and 387F may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the alternate entry MSN program, and credit or registration for Nursing 284C.

N 287G. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

The biological, environmental, cultural, and interpersonal factors affecting individuals with psychiatric-mental health problems. Four and one-half lecture hours a week for seven weeks. Nursing 484G and 287G may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; and Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, and 387F.

N 287H. Child Health Nursing.

Integrates concepts, theories, and processes essential to understanding the health and illness of children within the context of the family. Four and one-half lecture hours a week for seven weeks. Nursing 484H and 287H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; and Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, and 387F.

N 287J. Maternity Nursing.

Focuses on the normal processes and physiological alterations that occur before, during, and after pregnancy. Presents concepts, theories, and processes essential for promoting health and addressing health concerns of women, neonates, and their families during the childbearing years. Four and one-half lecture hours a week for seven weeks. Nursing 384J and 287J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; and Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, and 387F.

N 387K. Leading and Managing in Complex Healthcare Systems.

Concepts related to individual, group and organizational behavior are studied and applied to the processes of leading people and managing work in complex healthcare systems. Theories of nursing, economics, organizational psychology, management science, sociology, and complexity science are used to critically examine healthcare work environments. Theory application will focus on creating and sustaining healthy work environments, leading and managing organizational change, managing work processes, and administrative decision making. Relevant research in nursing and other behavioral sciences is reviewed. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nursing 386K and 387K may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 287P, 387P, 487P, 587P, 687P. Practicum in Nursing Education.

Designed to help the student prepare for a variety of roles in nursing education based on individual professional experience and goals. Practice teaching in clinical settings, simulation laboratories, and distant and live classrooms. Students teach patients, nursing staff members, or students individually or as groups. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and credit or registration for Nursing 387, 387C, or 388, or consent of instructor.

N 287Q. Public Health Nursing.

Integration of nursing, public health, and social science concepts and theories essential for promoting and restoring health and preventing disease and disability in aggregates, populations, and communities. Four and one-half lecture hours a week for seven weeks. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; and Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F.

N 387R. Adult Health Nursing II.

Advanced concepts, theories, and research findings essential for promoting and restoring health of adults with selected complex physiological alterations and responses. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484R and 387R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F; and credit or registration for Nursing 390F.

N 187S. Integration of Nursing Knowledge.

Integration of nursing knowledge derived from didactic and clinical courses, with application in case studies and simulated patients across the life span and in a variety of settings. One seminar hour a week for one semester. Nursing 484S and 187S may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 387R, 390F; and credit or registration for Nursing 290R.

N 388. Strategies of Teaching in Nursing.

Designed to prepare nurse educators across a spectrum of settings, including patient education, staff development, and college teaching. Explores the application of learning theory to a variety of teaching strategies and methods of evaluating processes and outcomes. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 387C or consent of instructor.

N 389C. Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist: Role Dimensions.

Survey of the underlying values and the central and core competencies of the adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist in adults (young adults through older adults) across the spheres of influence (patient, nursing practice, organization/system). Application of theory and research to advanced practice. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 392Q or consent of instructor.

N 389D. Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist: Health Promotion and Illness Prevention.

Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, and environmental concepts and testing of assessments and interventions for select adult-gerontology (AG) populations across the life spectrum (young adults through older adults). Two and one-half lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and credit or registration for Nursing 389C, 392E, and 396J.

N 589E. Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist: Chronic Illness.

Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, spiritual, and environmental concepts and testing of assessment and interventions for select adult-gerontology (AG) populations with chronic illness conditions. The focus is on dynamics of multiple chronic illness and related Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse specialist (AG-CNS) roles. Three lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 389C, 389D, 489F, 392E, 395C, 396C, and 396J; or consent of instructor.

N 389F, 489F. Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist: Acute Care.

Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, and environmental concepts and testing of assessments and interventions in select adult-gerontology populations experiencing acute illness. Focus on dynamics of acute illness and related Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse specialist (AG-CNS) roles. For 389F, two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 489F, two lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and either consent of instructor or the following coursework: Nursing 389C, 396C, and 396J and credit or registration for Nursing 389D, 392E, and 395C.

N 489H. Diagnosis and Management of Adult-Gerontology Health Problems.

Theoretical and clinical content for management of health problems of adult patients across the life spectrum (young adults through older adults). Integration and application of skills and knowledge gained in previous adult-gerontology clinical nurse specialist coursework for adult patients in the acute or chronic setting. Pattern recognition, critical thinking, analysis, diagnostic testing, differential diagnosis, and medical management of common adult, older-adult health problems. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 389C, 389D, 589E, 489F, 396C, and 396J; credit or registration for Nursing 689G; credit or registration for Nursing 395C or the equivalent; completion of all core courses in the adult health concentration; and consent of instructor.

N 389J. Adult Health Nursing: Health Promotion and Risk Reduction.

Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental issues related to health promotion. Explores risk reduction assessment, intervention strategies, the dynamics of health promotion, and related advanced nursing roles. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 396C and 396J, or consent of instructor.

N 389K. Adult Health Nursing: Chronic and Disabling Conditions.

Analysis of physiological, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental issues related to chronic conditions. Includes the dynamics of health promotion and risk reduction, symptom management, acute exacerbations, and related nursing roles within the context of chronic and disabling conditions. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For students in the holistic adult health nursing concentration, graduate standing; and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 392 and 392E, or consent of instructor; for others, graduate standing; and Nursing 389J and credit or registration for Nursing 396C, or consent of instructor.

N 389L. Adult Health Nursing: Practicum in Adult Health.

Guided field experience in which the student applies advanced nursing concepts in a selected area of adult health nursing or role specialty. Specific focus is determined by the needs or interests of the student. One lecture hour and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Nursing 389J, 389K, 392Q, 392E, and 392, or consent of instructor.

N 389M. Adult-Gerontology CNS: Practicum I.

Guided clinical application of Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (AG-CNS) core competencies (expert coaching, collaboration, consultation, research, leadership, and ethical decision-making) in delivery of care for select adult-gerontology (AG) populations to promote health and manage acute and/or multiple chronic conditions at the patient, nurse, and system level. Preparation for certification and credentialing as an AG-CNS. One lecture hour and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 389C, 389D, 392E, 392P, 392Q, 395C, 396C, 396J, and 489F, or consent of instructor.

N 389N. Adult-Gerontology CNS: Practicum II.

Guided clinical application of Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (AG-CNS) core competencies, such as expert coaching, collaboration, consultation, research, leadership, and ethical decision-making in the delivery of care for select adult-gerontology (AG) populations to promote health, and manage acute and/or multiple chronic conditions at the patient, nurse, and system level. Prepares students for certification and credentialing as an AG-CNS. One lecture hour and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Nursing 386Q, 589E, 389M, concurrent enrollment in 389P, or consent of instructor.

N 389P. Diagnosis and Management of Adult-Gerontology Health Problems.

This seminar course offers theoretical and clinical content for advanced nursing students to provide medical management of health problems for adult-gerontological patients. Students will learn pattern recognition, critical thinking, analysis, diagnostic testing, differential medical diagnosis, and medical management of common adult-gerontological health problems using an interprofessional team approach. This seminar is appropriate as a support course for other interprofessional graduate students. Three seminar hours a week for a semester. Nursing 489H and 389P may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 589E and credit or registration for 489N, or consent of instructor.

N 390C. Health Promotion of High-Risk Populations.

Advanced study of health promotion/illness prevention theories and research, with a focus on selected high-risk populations in the community. Emphasis on analyzing community risk factors, research and theory related to health promotion and illness prevention as applied to individuals, families, aggregates, and organizations, and research related to health outcomes for selected population groups, nationally and internationally. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 390D. Public Health in a Global Context.

Advanced study of theory and research related to public health within a global context. Examines relationships among public health needs and resources, health services, health policy, law, and population health indices. Emphasis is on developing both the knowledge fundamental to population-based health and the research base for optimizing public health through community action. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 390F. Adult Health Nursing I Practicum.

Application of concepts, theories, processes and skills pertinent to promoting and restoring the health of adults with selected commonly occurring physiological alterations and responses. Twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484F and 390F may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; and Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, and 387F.

N 290G. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Practicum.

Application of concepts, theories, processes, and skills that are pertinent to promoting mental health and providing nursing care for people with psychiatric and mental illnesses. Seventeen and one-half laboratory hours a week for seven weeks. Nursing 484G and 290G may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F; and credit or registration for Nursing 287G and 390F.

N 290H. Child Health Nursing Practicum.

Application of concepts, theories, processes, and skills pertinent to the care of children within the context of the family. Seventeen and one-half laboratory hours a week for seven weeks. Nursing 484H and 290H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F; and credit or registration for Nursing 287H and 390F.

N 290J. Maternity Nursing Practicum.

Application of concepts, theories, processes, and skills pertinent to the care of women, neonates, and their families during the childbearing years. Seventeen and one-half laboratory hours a week for seven weeks. Nursing 384J and 290J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F; and credit or registration for 287J and 390F.

N 390L. Educator as Leader.

Introduction to the essential skills that facilitate nursing leadership through innovative teaching. Critical elements include theoretical analysis and application of teaching and learning strategies, elements of effective communication, learner assessment, and evaluation strategies applicable in diverse academic and clinical settings. Approaches to the development of values integral for a novice nurse leader-educator are integrated throughout the course including ethical and legal considerations. Two-and-one-half lecture hours and three-quarters of a laboratory hour a week for one semester. Nursing 390L and 395 (Topic: Educator as Leader) may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

N 390M. Teaching and Learning in Practice Settings.

Designed to prepare the nurse educator to effectively assess, design, implement and evaluate educational experiences and/or projects for various learners in clinical and community practice settings. Covers experiential opportunities, evidence-based pedagogy, and best teaching practices in the simulated experiences; covers interprofessional education, staff development, and teaching patients, families, and nursing students using learning theory and cognitive science. Two lecture hours and one-and-one-half laboratory hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; credit or registration in Nursing 390L, or consent of instructor

N 390N. Teaching and Learning in Academic Settings.

Designed for the essentials of course, curriculum and program design, including assessment, evaluation, and ethical/legal standards of nursing education. Explore learning theory and evidence-based pedagogy, personal and professional values with regard to the art and science of nursing education and life-long learning. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 390L or consent of the instructor.

N 290Q. Public Health Nursing Practicum.

Application of public health nursing concepts, theories, and processes pertinent to the care of aggregates, populations, and communities. Seventeen and one-half laboratory hours a week for seven weeks. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F; and credit or registration for 287Q and 390F.

N 290R. Adult Health Nursing II Practicum.

Application of advanced concepts, theories, processes, and skills essential for promoting and restoring the health of adults with selected complex physiological alterations and responses. Eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nursing 484R and 290R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; Nursing 284C, 284N, 284P, 387F, 390F; and credit or registration for 284T, 387R, 187S.

N 290S. Integration of Nursing Knowledge Practicum.

Designed to assist the student in the application and integration of knowledge from didactic and clinical courses in the care of multiple patients. Forty laboratory hours a week for three weeks. Nursing 484S and 290S may not both be counted. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the alternate entry MSN program; and Nursing 284T, 187S, 390F, 290G, 290H, 290J, 290Q, 290R.

N 391D. Advanced Public Health Nursing: Community and Population Assessment.

Theories and methods to assess populations, communities, and aggregates. Students apply appropriate strategies to assess the strengths and needs of a selected population or community and make public health nursing diagnoses of populations or communities as the foundation for planning public health programs for health promotion and disease prevention. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 391H.

N 391E. Public Health Assurance and Policy.

Processes involved in the implementation and evaluation of a population-focused health promotion program based on community data sets and previously collected data; and policy recommendations related to the program. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 391D.

N 391F. Epidemiology in Public Health.

A theoretical framework for applied public health epidemiology, including the importance of high-quality data, measures of morbidity and mortality in a population, epidemiological investigations, and the use of epidemiological study designs. Two and one-half lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 391G. Public Health Program Development.

Focus on analyzing and critiquing health promotion and disease prevention initiatives, and obtaining and using relevant community and population-level health data for developing a multilevel health promotion and disease prevention initiative. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 391D or consent of instructor.

N 391H. Theories and Critical Issues in Public Health.

Major concepts and theories that guide public health practice for nurses and other professionals; local, national, and global issues and trends that shape public health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

N 691P. Advanced Public Health Nursing Practice.

Synthesis of public health nursing knowledge and skills in advanced practice. The multifaceted roles involved in advanced public health nursing practice, with emphasis on the ability to articulate one's professional roles based on theory and practice. One lecture hour and twenty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 391D and 391E.

N 392. Nursing Phenomena of Concern.

The major phenomena underlying research and advanced practice in nursing. Concepts derived from these phenomena address the wide range of health, health concerns, and populations that nurses treat. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 392E. Applications of Health Care Research.

Designed to prepare students to discover, examine, and evaluate knowledge, theories, and creative approaches to health care. Focuses on the skills needed to identify research questions in practice, evaluate existing practice in the light of research findings, and develop strategies to incorporate research findings into the clinical setting. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 392J. The Art and Science of Family Health.

Open to all graduate students with consent of instructor. Theoretical foundations for advanced practice in nursing and other disciplines concerned with family health: family, parent, and child health and development theories; conceptual basis for understanding the context in which parent and child health and illness exist; interdisciplinary concepts and theoretical perspectives. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in nursing, or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

N 592K. Parent-Child Nursing I: Childbearing Families.

Salient concepts and clinical basis for advanced nursing practice with childbearing families, considered from biophysical, psychological, developmental, family, and sociocultural perspectives. Introduction to concepts related to role development as an advanced practice nurse, with emphasis on the promotion of wellness and prevention of illness in pregnant women and their newborns within the context of their families. Students apply these concepts in providing nursing care to childbearing families in a variety of clinical settings under supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Three class hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 396C and 396J, and credit or registration for Nursing 395C.

N 592L. Parent-Child Nursing II: Childrearing Families.

Salient concepts and clinical basis for advanced nursing practice with childbearing families, considered from biophysical, psychological, developmental, family, and sociocultural perspectives. Legal, ethical, and practice issues affecting the advanced practice nurse. Emphasis on promotion of wellness and prevention of illness in children within the context of their families. Students apply concepts in providing nursing care to childrearing families in a variety of clinical settings under supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Three lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 592K.

N 392M. Clinical Project in Parent-Child Nursing.

Supervised, individual clinical project. One lecture hour and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 392P. Health Policy, Program Planning, and Evaluation.

Open to all University graduate students. Exploration of multilevel health care policy implementation, program development, and outcome evaluation. Focus on the application of policies from macro-level to micro-level systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Nursing 392E or the equivalent, or consent of instructor.

N 392Q. Advanced Psychosocial Nursing Care of Diverse Populations.

Emphasizes current theoretical, research, ethical, and cultural perspectives critical to the application of advanced psychosocial nursing strategies to promote health of diverse populations of individuals, groups, and families. Two and one-half lecture hours a week and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 492S. Advanced Practicum in Parent-Child Nursing.

Culminating preceptorship experience: each student identifies his or her objectives for refining the role of the advanced practice nurse and selects the clinical setting and target population(s) that best support those objectives. One lecture hour and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 592U.

N 392T. Advanced Assessment in Parent-Child Nursing.

Advanced nursing assessment strategies for childbearing and childrearing families. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 592U. Parent-Child Nursing III: At-Risk Families.

Salient concepts and clinical basis for advanced nursing practice with at-risk families during the childbearing years. Legal, ethical, and practice issues affecting the advanced practice nurse. Emphasis is on assessment and intervention with pregnant women and children with health problems that have a social and biophysical etiology. Students apply concepts in providing nursing care to at-risk families in a variety of clinical settings under supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Three lecture hours and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 592L.

N 192V, 392V. Advanced Pediatric Pathophysiology.

Pathophysiology unique to the growth and development of newborns, infants, children, and adolescents. Embryology, genetics, adaptation to extrauterine life, congenital anomalies, immunology, and the physiology and pathophysiology of puberty. Pathophysiology is studied from a developmental perspective, to encourage students' in-depth understanding of functional and dysfunctional integration of organ systems in the developing human; the goal is to give students a foundation for assessing and intervening with a variety of childhood health conditions based on pathophysiological changes. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 492W. Advanced Practicum in Child Health.

Prominent concepts of biophysical, psychological, developmental, family, and sociocultural perspectives, and the clinical basis for master's-level nursing practice with children and their families. Students use advanced concepts and theories in working with faculty members and preceptors in hospitals, clinics, schools, or homes. Two lecture hours and eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 392V, 394C, and 396T.

N 393. Parents, Children, and Family Life.

Study of theories on parents, children, and family life; critical review of major research findings, with emphasis on implications for further research. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

N 393M. Maternal/Parent-Child Nursing.

Class and/or laboratory hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Seminar in Parenthood and Family Life. Advanced seminar on theory and research related to parenthood and family life.
Topic 3: Work and Family: Psychological and Social Aspects of Multiple Roles. Advanced seminar focusing on occupational and parental roles and the resulting strains and health consequences.
Topic 4: Predictive and Interventive Research with Families. Advanced seminar reviewing, critiquing, and applying predictive and interventive research studies.

N 293P. Pediatric Diagnostic Reasoning and Advanced Invasive Skills.

Interpretation of laboratory and diagnostic testing; and the development of diagnostic and psychomotor skills needed to care for acute or critically ill neonatal and pediatric patients. One and one-half lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, credit or registration for Nursing 394C or the equivalent, and credit or registration for Nursing 392V or the equivalent.

N 393Q. Advanced Neonatal Nursing I.

Assessment and implementation of advanced nursing care of the high-risk preterm neonate. Development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making; provision of care within a family-centered and developmentally supportive context. Concepts related to advanced role development of nurse practitioners. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, credit or registration for Nursing 293P and 395D, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 293R, and consent of instructor.

N 293R. Advanced Neonatal Nursing I--Clinic.

Assessment and implementation of advanced nursing care of the high-risk preterm neonate. Development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making; provision of care within a family-centered and developmentally supportive context. Concepts related to advanced role development of nurse practitioners. Eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 393Q, and consent of instructor.

N 393S. Advanced Neonatal Nursing II.

Knowledge and skills needed to recognize and respond to emerging crises and organ system dysfunction or failure in full-term neonates with complex acute, critical, or chronic health conditions. Stabilizing the patient, minimizing complications, restoring maximum health potential through risk reduction, and providing family-centered care. Current research and evidence, theoretical models, and philosophies of care. Continued development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 393Q and 293R, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 293T, and consent of instructor.

N 293T. Advanced Neonatal Nursing II--Clinic.

Continued development of advanced clinical skills in the management of high-risk neonates. Students incorporate nursing theory, current research and evidence, and complex skills into the care of full-term neonates with acute, critical, or chronic health conditions. Integration, under supervision of faculty members and preceptors, of the neonatal nurse practitioner role in the care of high-risk neonates in neonatal intensive care, labor and delivery, and interhospital and intrahospital transport. Eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 393S, and consent of instructor.

N 393U. Advanced Neonatal Nursing III.

Transition to home care and follow-up care for high-risk neonates and infants and their families. Synthesis of current research and evidence and theoretical concepts in nursing and the social and behavioral sciences that are relevant to care from admission to discharge. Continued development of a critical, analytical approach to clinical decision making. Advanced role development; legal, political, and ethical issues affecting nurse practitioner practice. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 393S and 293T, and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 293V.

N 293V. Advanced Neonatal Nursing III--Clinic.

Continued development of advanced clinical skills in the management of high-risk neonates and infants. Under the supervision of faculty members and preceptors, students incorporate nursing theory, current research and evidence, and complex skills into the care of neonates and infants from hospital admission to discharge to follow-up care in the community. Integration of knowledge and skills needed to care effectively and efficiently for neonates and infants whose life processes are assisted by or dependent on technological devices. Eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 393U, and consent of instructor.

N 493W. Advanced Neonatal Nursing Practicum.

Concentrated and supervised application of knowledge and skills gained in previous courses to the management of high-risk neonates and infants. Evaluation of patients presenting with complex health problems and of their families; development of comprehensive evidence-based management plans under the supervision of faculty members and preceptors. Sixteen clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 393U and 293V, and consent of instructor.

N 194, 294, 394, 494. Independent Study in Nursing.

Detailed or in-depth study in a specific topic area. Topic and mode of study are agreed upon by student and instructor. One, two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

N 394C. Advanced Pediatric Health and Developmental Assessment.

Advanced developmental and health assessment of children (newborn through adolescent). Emphasis is on theories and skills applicable to the assessment of children. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, credit or registration for Nursing 192V and 396C, and consent of instructor.

N 294D. Primary Health Care of the Adolescent.

Study of health promotion, anticipatory guidance, prevention of illness, and the assessment and management of illnesses commonly affecting adolescents. Adolescent health is discussed in a developmental context. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, credit or registration for Nursing 394C or 396J, and consent of instructor.

N 394E. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts I.

Study of health promotion, anticipatory guidance, prevention of illness, and the assessment and management of acute illnesses commonly affecting children. Concepts related to advanced role development of nurse practitioners. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: For students in the pediatric nurse practitioner concentration, graduate standing and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 394F and 395D; for others, graduate standing, Nursing 394C and 392V, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 394F, and consent of instructor.

N 194F, 394F. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts I Clinic.

Clinical experience in primary care settings, focusing on health promotion and management of well-child care and acute illnesses commonly encountered in children. For 194F, four laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 394F, twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 394C, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 394E and 395D; and consent of instructor.

N 294H. Advanced Practicum in Maternity Nursing.

Guided field experience in which the student applies advanced nursing concepts in a selected area of maternity care. Designed to provide students, under the direction of a clinical mentor, extensive clinical experience to integrate skills relevant to his or her selected professional role. One lecture hour and eight clinical hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 494G, and credit or registration for Nursing 394N.

N 294J. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts III.

Primary care management of complex conditions in children. Additional emphasis on advanced role development of the pediatric nurse practitioner. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 394E and 394F, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 494K, and consent of instructor.

N 494K. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts III Clinic.

Pediatric primary health care practicum in the advanced nursing management of the health of infants, children, and adolescents. Sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 396U and 396V, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 294J, and consent of instructor.

N 494L. Advanced Physiologic Concepts in Maternity Nursing.

Advanced concepts related to the physiological, pharmacologic, and environmental adaptations during childbearing. Interpretation of relevant biopsychosocial data; research related to the physiologic and pharmacologic effects in reproductive health; foundation for nursing care to the maternal-newborn dyad in the family context. Three lecture hours and four clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 394N and 396C.

N 394M. Health Promotion in Maternity Nursing.

Analysis of concepts related to health promotion, illness prevention, and health disparities throughout the perinatal period (fertility, pregnancy, birth, newborn, lactation, and parenting). Theories and research related to psychosocial concepts, family, parenting, pre-conception, systems of care, and cultural perspectives for health promotion in reproductive health are examined. Investigates the application of theoretical principles and research evidence relating to the care of women and newborns in a variety of settings under faculty and preceptor supervision. Two lecture hours and four clinical practicum hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and credit or registration for Nursing 396C.

N 394N. High-Risk Maternity Nursing.

Significant biopsychosocial concepts that serve as a basis for nursing practice in high-risk maternity care; knowledge needed to identify common maternity complications; assessment and planning of evidence-based maternity care within the family context. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 394M.

N 294P. Advanced Practicum in Maternity Nursing.

Guided field experience in which the student applies advanced nursing concepts in a selected area of maternity care. Under the direction of a clinical mentor, the student obtains extensive clinical experience to integrate skills relevant to his or her selected professional role. One lecture hour and four clinical hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 394M, and credit or registration for Nursing 394N.

N 394Q. Pediatric Acute Care Management I.

Designed to prepare students to recognize, interpret, and respond to emerging health crises and organ system dysfunction or failure in children with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions. Emphasizes patient stabilization, minimizing complications, restoring maximal health potential through risk reduction, and providing physical and psychosocial support to the patient and family. Acute, critical, and chronic disorders within selected physiological systems are explored from a developmental and multicultural perspective. Six lecture hours every other week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 394E and 194F, credit or registration for Nursing 293P and 395D, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 294R, and consent of instructor.

N 294R. Pediatric Acute Care Management I: Clinical.

Provides an opportunity for the beginner acute care pediatric nurse practitioner student to apply advanced knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology, current research and evidence, and diagnostic and psychomotor skills to caring for children with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions, and their families. Eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 394Q, and consent of instructor. Students must also have proof of current Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) training from the American Heart Association.

N 394S. Pediatric Acute Care Management II.

Designed to prepare students to recognize, interpret, and respond to emerging health crises and organ system dysfunction or failure of physiological systems in children with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions. Emphasizes patient stabilization, minimizing complications, and restoring maximum health potential. Explores core concepts such as transport, complex discharge planning, rehabilitation, home care, and long-term care. Six lecture hours every other week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 394Q and 294R, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 294T, and consent of instructor.

N 294T. Pediatric Acute Care Management II: Clinical.

Designed to prepare students for clinical competence consistent with that of a beginner acute care pediatric nurse practitioner. Under the supervision of faculty and preceptors, students integrate advanced knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology, current research and evidence, and diagnostic and psychomotor skills to create comprehensive management plans for children with complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions. Eight laboratory hours per week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, concurrent enrollment in Nursing 394S, and consent of instructor. Students must also have proof of current Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) training from the American Heart Association.

N 594U. Pediatric Acute Care Advanced Practicum.

Designed to prepare students to demonstrate the clinical competence of an advanced beginner acute care pediatric nurse practitioner. Under the supervision of faculty and preceptors, students have the opportunity to make independent and interdependent decisions in managing emerging health crises and organ system dysfunction in children with a variety of complex acute, critical, and chronic health conditions. Students work in a variety of settings, including emergency departments, intensive care units, inpatient medical and surgical units, and subspecialty clinics. Explores the legal, political, and ethical issues affecting nurse practitioner practice. Twenty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 394S and 294T, and consent of instructor. Students must also have proof of current Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) training from the American Heart Association.

N 394V. Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Mental Health for Primary Care.

Examines foundational content relative to the care of children and adolescents with behavioral and psychiatric mental health disorders. Aspects of care examined will include health promotion, screening, treatment and referral to psychiatric mental health specialists. Focus on inter-professional and collaborative practice using evidence-based models for evaluation and management of common behavioral and psychiatric mental health disorders in the child and adolescent. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Credit for Nursing 394E and Nursing 394F, or consent of instructor.

N 195, 295, 395, 495, 595, 695. Topics in Nursing.

Areas of special interest. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; some topics also require consent of instructor.

Topic 2: Community Programs Evaluation.

N 395C. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Application of pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic principles to drug therapy management in family primary care nursing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 395D. Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

The study of pediatric pharmacotherapeutics, with emphasis on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, administration, and education. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

N 395E. Doctor of Nursing Practice Role.

Restricted to students in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program. Explores the role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice in the broader healthcare environment along with the development and application of knowledge in advanced practice nursing roles. Emphasizes how knowledge is acquired, the theoretical underpinnings upon which nursing practice is based, and the application of knowledge to practice. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for a semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 395F. Theoretical Foundations for Nursing Practice.

Restricted to students in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program. Examines the nature of theory and theory development for nursing practice; the application of theory to practice, practice change, and scholarship are also explored. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 395G. Translating Evidence into Nursing Practice.

Restricted to students in the Doctor of Nursing Practice program. Methods for developing best practice protocols and putting them into action. Explores analytic and measurement methods to critically appraise literature, how to function as a consultant or in a collaborative research role, and participation in dissemination of evidence-based practice guidelines to improve healthcare outcomes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 395H. Health Promotion Among Diverse Cultures.

Analyzes the impact of social, cultural, and ecological factors of healthcare delivery on various population groups. Emphasizes the application of sociocultural diversity as well as theories and methods for analyzing healthcare phenomena within the context of advanced practice nursing roles. In the context of an ethical and legal framework, the social issues common among vulnerable populations will also be examined. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Nursing 395E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395J. Health Policy Development and Implementation.

Explores the leadership role of nurses in health policy, including the socio-political and economic context of health, advocacy, policy development, analysis, and implementation at the local, state, national, and global levels. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 394E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395K. Leadership in Organizations and Systems.

Explores leadership theory, organizational theory, philosophy, culture, structure, processes, information management, interdisciplinary communication, and other areas relevant to healthcare organizations. Examines the role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice nurse within the larger context of the health care system. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 394E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395L. Quality Improvement and Safety Principles and Methods.

Provides an overview of the components of the quality improvement processes and quality improvement methodologies to promote safe patient outcomes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395M. Epidemiology and Population Health.

Explores in detail the roles of federal, state, and local governments in relationship to the core functions of public health. Health disparities and the needs of priority populations will also be analyzed. Health promotion models impacting specific populations and population-focused health initiatives will be evaluated. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395N. Biostatistics.

Basic concepts in descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Explores intermediate statistical concepts including analysis of variance (ANOVA) with planned comparisons and post-hoc tests, factorial ANOVA, bivariate linear correlation and logistic and multiple regression, survival analysis, the chi-square tests for goodness of fit and association, the Mann-Whitney U test, and the essentials of sample size estimation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395P. Health Care Economics.

Explores basic economic theory, market drivers and restraints, health care budget, financial management and reimbursement, cost/benefit analysis, and healthcare entrepreneurialism. Includes theory and application, with a particular focus on the clinical role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice within the contemporary healthcare environment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, and 395G.

N 295R. Professional Role of the FNP.

Explores concepts and theory from nursing, social, and biological sciences related to primary care management of complex health/illness conditions in adults and children as members of families. Emphasis is on community/social issues influencing individual and family health, complex individual, family and/or community interventions, advanced role development and legal, political, ethical issues affecting nurse practitioner practice. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396Q and 196R, 296R, 396R, 496R; or consent of instructor.

N 395S. Healthcare Information Systems.

Employs multidisciplinary approaches to informatics by incorporating nursing science, computer science, and information science. Examines the resources and methods required to apply these technologies to clinical guidelines, communication systems and to enhance health care delivery. Opportunities to analyze information requirements, design system alternatives, and consider the management of resources is integrated in the course. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395T, 495T, 595T. DNP Clinical Leadership Specialization Seminar and Practicum I.

Identification of a clinical leadership specialization interest by the Doctor of Nursing Practice student beginning in the second semester of the program. The clinical specialization focus includes identification of evidence-based strategies for implementing and achieving health care outcomes, such as a significant pilot study, a program evaluation project, a quality improvement project, a policy analysis, or a practice change initiative. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience. For 395T, one lecture and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 495T, one lecture and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 595T, one lecture and sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, and 395G.

N 395U, 495U, 595U. DNP Clinical Leadership Specialization Seminar and Practicum II.

Examines the feasibility of implementing and achieving health care outcomes such as a significant pilot study, a program evaluation project, a quality improvement project, a policy analysis, or a practice change initiative in an identified area of clinical leadership specialization. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience. For 395U, one lecture and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 495U, one lecture and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 595U, one lecture and sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, 395G, and 395T or 495T or 595T.

N 395V, 495V, 595V. DNP Clinical Leadership Specialization Seminar and Practicum III.

Implementation of a significant pilot study, a program evaluation project, a quality improvement project, a policy analysis, or a practice change initiative in an identified area of clinical leadership specialization. Implementation strategies include incorporation of the most recent evidence-based practice in the management of patient care within an interdisciplinary practice model, utilization of evidence-based research in the clinical management of individuals, families, and communities as well as experience in leadership and systems analysis in complex organizations, managing interdisciplinary teams, and developing and implementing quality improvement projects and evidence-based management systems to improve patient, population and health systems outcomes. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience. For 395V, one lecture hour and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 495V, one lecture hour and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 595V, one lecture hour and sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, 395G, and 395U or 495U or 595U.

N 395W, 495W, 595W. DNP Clinical Leadership Specialization Seminar and Practicum IV.

Provides the opportunity for dissemination of outcomes such as those resulting from a significant pilot study, a program evaluation project, a quality improvement project, a policy analysis, or a practice change initiative in an identified area of clinical leadership specialization and serves as a foundation for future scholarly practice. The student is required to submit an individualized practicum proposal and objectives for the practicum experience. For 395W, one lecture hour and eight laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 495W, one lecture hour and twelve laboratory hours a week for one semester; for 595W, one lecture hour and sixteen laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 395E, 395F, 395G, and 395V or 495V or 595V.

N 396C. Advanced Pathophysiology.

Pathophysiologic concepts from the cellular level through major body systems and across the life span. Etiological, pathogenic, and presenting patterns. Fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology. Students are expected to develop an understanding of nursing and medical interventions for common health problems and the ability to apply and design interventions based on pathophysiologic changes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nursing 396C and Pharmacy 395D may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

N 396J. Advanced Health Assessment.

Advanced knowledge and skills involved in the assessment of individuals throughout the life span, within the context of the family, to determine their health status. Two lecture hours, three laboratory hours, and one hour of skills laboratory a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, credit or registration for Nursing 396C, and consent of instructor.

N 196K, 296K. Advanced Health Assessment Clinic.

Application of health assessment concepts and skills under the supervision of faculty and clinical preceptors in the clinical area. Performance of systematic health assessments of adults leading to the identification of normal and abnormal findings and the development of an initial health status list. Four or eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the advanced practice specialization, credit or registration for Nursing 396C and 396J, and consent of instructor.

N 396L. Primary Health Care Concepts I.

Theoretical and clinical knowledge needed for advanced nursing management within the context of the family and the community of individuals who are essentially well or who have minor health problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 396J and 296K; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 196M, 296M, or 396M; and consent of instructor.

N 196M, 296M, 396M. Primary Health Care Concepts I Clinic.

Supervised experience in the nursing management of infants, children, and/or advanced adults and families who are well or who have common acute health problems. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 396C, 396J, and 296K; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396L; and consent of instructor.

N 396N. Primary Health Care Concepts II.

Theoretical and clinical knowledge needed for the management of complex and chronic health problems of individuals and families. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 396L and 396M; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 196P, 296P, or 396P; and consent of instructor.

N 196P, 296P, 396P. Primary Health Care Concepts II Clinic.

Supervised experience in the nursing management of infants, children, adults, and families who have complex or chronic health problems. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 391D, 396L, and 396M; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396N; and consent of instructor.

N 396Q. Primary Health Care Concepts III.

Offers the FNP student the theoretical and clinical content for management of complex health problems throughout the lifespan. Focus is on the integration and application of skills and knowledge gained in prior FNP coursework for pediatric, adult, and aging clients in primary health care settings. Use pattern recognition, critical thinking, analysis, diagnostic testing, differential diagnosis and medical management of complex health problems throughout the lifespan. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Nursing 295R and 196R, 296R, 396R, 496R; or consent of instructor.

N 196R, 296R, 396R, 496R. Primary Health Care Concepts III Clinic.

Advanced supervised experience as a direct primary health care giver in family practice clinical settings. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 391E; either Nursing 396N and 396P or 396U and 396V; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 295R and 396Q; and consent of instructor.

N 196S. Special Project in Advanced Practice.

Development of a special project in an area of research, policy, or clinical issues relevant to advanced practice. Four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, admission to the family nurse practitioner or the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization, Nursing 396L and 396M, and consent of instructor.

N 396T. Ecological Approaches to Child Health.

The ecological approach to understanding individual, parental, family, and societal determinants of children's health. Students gain knowledge of developmental and family theories and use epidemiological principles to comprehend the complex dimensions and related conceptual factors that contribute to the health and well-being of children within families. Theoretical foundations for graduate students interested in health promotion and risk reduction for children and families. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 396U. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts II.

Theoretical knowledge relevant to the management of complex and chronic primary health care problems from infancy through adolescence. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner or the parent/child nursing specialization; Nursing 396C, 396L, and 396M; concurrent enrollment in Nursing 196V, 296V, or 396V; and consent of instructor.

N 196V, 296V, 396V. Pediatric Primary Health Care Concepts II Clinic.

Clinical practice in the management of complex or chronic health problems of infants, children, and adolescents in a specialty setting as well as management in primary care. For each semester hour of credit earned, four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; admission to the pediatric nurse practitioner specialization; Nursing 394E, 394F and concurrent enrollment in Nursing 396U and consent of instructor.

N 396W. Advanced Adult Health Assessment.

Introduces advanced knowledge and skills related to assessing the health of adult individuals. Emphasis is on combining nursing, biological, psychological, and sociocultural knowledge with theories of health and aging as they apply to the comprehensive assessment of client concerns and interpretation of clinical data relating to health promotion, health maintenance, and illness care. Two lecture hours, one skills laboratory hour, and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 197C. Doctoral Seminar I.

Introduction to nursing science. Explores the history, current priorities, and funding mechanisms of science development in nursing along with established programs of nursing research. Provides a forum for students to develop and exchange ideas regarding research topics. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 197D. Doctoral Seminar II.

One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 197C or consent of instructor.

N 397K. Advanced Research in Nursing.

Nursing science methods for developing and testing theoretical formulations: experimental, descriptive, qualitative, and historical designs. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional computer laboratory hours to be arranged. Required of all doctoral students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 392E, and consent of instructor.

N 397L. Nursing Research Methods.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional computer laboratory hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Nursing 397K, and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Analysis and Interpretation of Data. Critiquing, interpreting, disseminating, and using research findings.
Topic 2: Instrumentation and Measurement. Theoretical, methodological, and procedural aspects of measurement: norm-referenced and criterion-referenced measurement; data management and instrumentation.
Topic 3: Conceptual Foundations of Research Design and Methods. Theoretical approach to basic statistical and measurement concepts and their importance to research in health-related areas.
Topic 4: Critical Review of the Literature. Designed to assist the novice researcher in conducting a systematic and critical review of the literature in a substantial area of health-related scholarship. Nursing 381M (Topic 2) and 397L (Topic 4) may not both be counted.
Topic 5: Quantitative Design, Methods, and Analysis. The quantitative research design, methods, and analyses used in health care research. Includes descriptive, correlational, and experimental designs; related methods of analyses using statistical software; and interpretation of data. Additional prerequisite: Nursing 397L (Topic 3) or consent of instructor.

N 397M. Qualitative Research.

Introduction to the theoretical and methodological aspects of qualitative research methods. Qualitative research approaches from a variety of disciplines and philosophical traditions, with emphasis on the application of research designs and data collection and analysis techniques to nursing studies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and completion of two doctoral-level research courses or consent of instructor.

N 197P, 297P. Nursing Research Practicum.

Guided experience in conceptual and methodological aspects of research: data management and analysis; critique and interpretation; instrumentation; and measurement. Four or eight laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated twice for credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and Nursing 397K.

N 397Q. Research Practicum I.

Examines essential aspects of the responsible conduct of research and beginning skills needed to initiate a research program. Students focus on conceptual, methodological, and practical aspects of research within an ongoing faculty research project. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; and Nursing 397L (Topic 3: Conceptual Foundations of Research Design and Methods), or credit or registration for Nursing 397L (Topic 5: Quantitative Design, Methods, and Analysis), or consent of instructor.

N 397R. Research Practicum II.

Examines essential procedural aspects of conducting health-related research. Students focus on conceptual, methodological, and practical aspects of research within an ongoing faculty research project. One and one-half lecture hours and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; Nursing 397L (Topic 3: Conceptual Foundations of Research Design and Methods), 397L (Topic 5: Quantitative Design, Methods, and Analysis), or consent of instructor; and credit or registration for Nursing 380M (Topic 4: Philosophical and Theoretical Bases of Nursing Science), 382, or consent of instructor.

N 397S. Research Practicum III.

Focuses on essential skills needed to develop a research proposal and plan an independent research program. Students focus on conceptual, methodological, and practical aspects of research within an ongoing faculty research project. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Nursing 397M and 397R.

N 698. Thesis.

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in nursing and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Nursing 698A.

N 398T. Supervised Teaching and Learning in Nursing.

Designed to introduce the student to the essential elements of nursing education prior to engaging in the role of assistant instructor. Critical elements include the theoretical bases of teaching and learning; teaching strategies for clinical and classroom settings; assessment and evaluation strategies for various educational settings; ethical and legal considerations; and the importance of engaging in the scholarship of teaching. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

N 399R, 699R, 999R. Dissertation.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Completion of core doctoral courses and admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

N 399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation.

Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Nursing 399R, 699R, or 999R.