Minor and Certificate Programs

Policy for Moody College Students

While a minor is not required as part of any communication degree program, the student may choose to complete a minor in any field to which he/she gains entry. A student may declare only one minor or certificate to supplement his/her Moody major(s); exceptions must be approved by the dean. Moody students must declare their minor/certificate intentions before they have completed 65% of their degree requirements, as indicated on the Interactive Degree Audit (IDA); exceptions must be approved by the dean.

The transcript-recognized undergraduate academic minor must be completed in conjunction with an undergraduate degree at The University of Texas at Austin. For more information regarding the requirements for achieving a minor or certificate, including a comprehensive list of minors and certificates, please visit the Minors and Certificate Programs section of the Undergraduate Catalog.

Minors Offered

Communication and Social Change

Students in this minor will learn how communication, as an interdisciplinary approach, can be used to build and assess strategic approaches in campaigns, advocacy, and social movements. This concentration will allow students to focus on areas of substantive interest through specialized guidance, course participation, and experiential learning.

The minor is open to all undergraduate majors at The University of Texas at Austin and requires 18 semester hours of coursework. Nine hours must be taken at the upper-division level, and at least nine hours must be taken in residence. If demand exceeds space available the Moody College reserves the right to select students based on a review of their academic record.

The requirements for the minor are as follows:

RequirementsHours
COM 323Communication Internship (Topic 2: Social Change Internship)3
Fifteen additional hours to be chosen from the following:15
Integrated Communication for Nonprofit Organizations
Integrated Communication for Nonprofit Organizations
Health Communication: Messages, Campaigns, and the Media
Health Communication: Messages, Campaigns, and the Media
Public Communication of Science and Techology
Public Communication of Science and Techology
Communicating Sustainability
Communicating Sustainability
Multicultural Issues in Advertising and Public Relations (any topic)
Communication and Social Change
Political Communication
Conflict Resolution
Contemporary Representation in Media
Minorities and the Media
Reporting the World: A Critical Examination of the United States News Media
Gender and the News
Journalism, Society, and the Citizen Journalist
Communicating Social Change
Social Activism in Film
Screening Race
Topics in Global Media (Topic 8: Development Communication and Social Change)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 13: Activist Media)
Please Note:
Students must petition the faculty committee in advance if they wish to substitute another course to use toward any requirement.

Communication Studies Minor

The minor in Communication Studies affords undergraduate students across the University the opportunity to increase their skills in communication, particularly in the areas of organizational, interpersonal, and rhetorical communication. In addition, students study the foundations of public speaking, verbal and non-verbal communication, and intercultural communication as well as learn techniques to approach ethical dilemmas within the field of communication.

The Department of Communication Studies reserves the right to limit the number of students accepted as Communication Studies Minors. Nine hours of coursework must be taken in residence. All communication studies minor coursework must have a grade of at least C-; if the course is offered on the pass/fail basis only, the student must earn the symbol CR. Students must earn a 2.0 minimum GPA in courses counting toward the minor. This minor is not available to students with a major in the Moody College.

The course requirements are as follows:

RequirementsHours
CMS 306MProfessional Communication Skills3
CMS 315MInterpersonal Communication Theory3
Twelve additional hours from the following list: 12
Topics in Communication Studies (any topic)
Advanced Presentation Skills
Communication Ethics
Rhetoric: East and West
Interpersonal Health Communication
Argumentation and Advocacy
Theories of Persuasion
Case Studies in Argumentation
Nonverbal Communication
Strategic Sales and Event Planning
Building Sales Relationships
Communication and Social Change
Digital Communications
Political Communication
Lying and Deception
Communication and Public Opinion
Rhetoric of Popular Culture
Visual Media and Interaction
Advanced Analysis of Popular Culture
Social Media and Organizations
Conflict Resolution
Intercultural Communication
Family Communication
Communication and Personal Relationships
Language, Culture, and Communication of Hip-Hop
Pre-Graduate School Mentorship
Pre-Graduate School Mentorship
Pre-Graduate School Mentorship
Rhetoric, Love, and Democracy
Celebrity Culture
Rhetoric of Film
Rhetoric and Popular Music
Religious Communication and Paranormalism
Practicum in Conflict Mediation
Time Matters
The Politics of National Memory
Advocacy and Politics

Digital Media Minor

The Digital Media Minor in the Department of Radio-Television-Film (RTF) provides a selection of courses that will cultivate students’ understandings and abilities in a general area recognized as digital media. The courses in this minor emphasize a) knowledge of how communication technologies have developed historically; b) their social and cultural functions and dynamics; c) how specific communication and cultural industries operate and evolve in a global environment; and d) how elements of art and design figure into expressions of and interactions with digital media. Students completing this minor will gain advanced skills in digital media domains including social media and new media industries. They will also examine ethical issues developing around the new media environment.

This program is open only to students who are not majoring in RTF. Applicants must have a 2.5 cumulative grade point average. The Radio-Television-Film Department reserves the right to limit the number of students accepted as digital media minors. If demand exceeds space available, students will be selected based on a review of a student’s academic record. Acceptance into the minor does not come with preference or guarantee of a seat in any RTF course.

The minor requires 15 hours of coursework, and at least nine hours completed in residence. All courses must be taken for a letter grade, unless the course is only offered on a pass/fail basis.  Only courses with a C- (or CR) or better will be counted toward the minor. Students must petition to the faculty committee in advance if they wish to substitute another internship course in place of Radio-Television-Film 330M.

Students must take the following coursework:

RequirementsHours
RTF 326CTech Culture3
Three hours from the Industries and Practices cluster of digital media courses:3
The Information Society (Topic 1: Information Society and Beyond)
The Business of Hollywood
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 7: Race and Digital Media Culture)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 9: Media Industries and Entrepreneurship)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 10: Globalization and Social Media)
Media and Policy (Topic 1: Media, Communication Law, and Ethics)
Three hours from the Art and Design cluster of digital media courses:3
Digital Remix Cultures
New Communication Technologies (Topic 1: Digital Media and Design)
Topics in New Communication Technologies (Topic 4: Video Game Culture and Criticism)
Experimental Media and the Art of Disruption
Three hours from the Cultures and Social Change cluster of digital media courses:3
Topics in New Communication Technologies (Topic 3: Internet Cultures)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 5: Social Media: Growth, Uses, and Impacts)
Media Literacy (Topic 3: Media Literacy and Civic Engagement)
Three additional hours in a related area:3
Internship in Digital Media
Digital Media Production
Special Applications of Digital Media Production (Topic 5: Writing for Interactive Games and Media)
Introduction to Two-Dimensional Animation

Global Communication Minor

The Global Communication Minor is designed to give students a global perspective of the communication industries. Students will learn about the essential role of communication in our increasingly interconnected and multicultural society.

This program is only open to students in the Moody College of Communication. At least nine hours must be completed in residence and at least six hours must be taken at the upper-division level. Students must earn a grade of at least a C-  (or CR for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis) in each course counted toward fulfillment of the minor requirements.

The minor requires 15 semester hours of coursework. The requirements are:

RequirementsHours
COM 323Communication Internship (Topic 3: Global Experience) 13
Twelve hours of coursework selected from the list below: 212
International Advertising
Language, Communication, and Culture
Rhetoric: East and West
Intercultural Communication
Reporting en Espanol
Covering the Global Economy
Reporting Asia: A Foreign Correspondent's Framework
Documentary Tradition of Latin America
Reporting the World: A Critical Examination of the United States News Media
Human Rights Journalism
Domestic Issues and Global Perspective
Reporting Latin America
Introduction to Global Media
Topics in Global Media (Topic 1: National Media Systems)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 2: Comparative Media Systems)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 7: Global Media Systems)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 8: Development Communication and Social Change)
Global Media and Area Studies (Topic 1: Media and the Middle East)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 8: Migration and Media)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 10: Globalization and Social Media)
Please Note:
Students should consult the Student Advising Office for additional information about the coursework that meets minor requirements.

1. Or an approved substitution of study abroad coursework or internship coursework done while studying abroad.

2. Three hours may be substituted with experiential learning courses to be petitioned by the student for credit. 

Health Communication Minor

The Health Communication Minor is intended for any University student interested in advanced study of health communication. Students completing the minor program will understand how health communication professionals think and be prepared for careers in population health, medical, clinic management, and communication agencies, among others. More information about the Health Communication Minor is available at https://moody.utexas.edu/students/minors/minor-health-communication.

This program is open to all University of Texas at Austin students. The Moody College reserves the right to limit the number of students accepted into this minor by instituting a competitive application process. Applicants may be judged on such factors as grade point average, prior coursework taken, prior experience in the field, and response to essay prompts.

The minor program requires 16 semester hours of coursework including nine hours to be completed in residence. Students must fulfill the following requirements:

RequirementsHours
COM 102Introduction to Health Communication1
Interpersonal Communication:3
Interpersonal Health Communication
Argumentation and Advocacy
Theories of Persuasion
Lying and Deception
Communication and Personal Relationships
Personal Relationships
Guidance in Adult-Child Relationships
Guidance in Adult-Child Relationships
Communication Skills for Health Professionals
Organizational Communication:3
Digital Communications
Social Media and Organizations
Family Communication
Child Development
Child Development
Socioeconomic Problems of Families
Theories of Child and Family Development
Communication in Health Care Settings
Current Social Work Topics (Topic 4: Practice with Abused and Neglected Children and their Families)
Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 4: Family Relationships)
Family Relationships
Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 19: Diversity in American Families)
Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 23: Romantic Relationships and Family Formation)
Population/Mass Media:3
Psychology of Advertising
Account Planning
Seminar in American Culture (Topic 1: American Cultural History of Alcohol/Drugs)
Clinical Bacteriology Laboratory
Conference Course
Time Matters
Health Economics
Adolescent Development
Human Sexuality
Introduction to Statistics
Topics in American Government and Politics (Topic 23: Politics of Healthcare)
Topics in Environmental Geography (Topic 1: Children's Environmental Health)
Undergraduate Seminar in United States History (Topic 5: American Cultural History of Alcohol/Drugs)
Introduction to Health and Society
Introduction to Health and Society
Child Development
Child Development
Adolescent Development in Context
Advanced Child and Family Development (Topic 6: Into to Early Childhood Interventions)
Child and Adolescent Health
Theories of Substance Use and Abuse
Foundations of Epidemiology
Adolescent Health Risk Behavior
Psychosocial Issues in Women's Health
Topical Seminar in Health Promotion (Topic 1: Foundations of Health Promotion I)
Foundations of Health Promotion II
Undergraduate Seminar in United States History (Topic 18: Women in Sickness and Health)
Reporting Public Health and Science
Children's Exercise and Physical Activity
Fieldwork in Health (Topic 3: Sexual Health I)
Public Health Nursing
Public Health Nursing
Topics in Nursing (Topic 1: Women's Reproductive Health for Nonscience Majors)
Global Health
Nutrition Education and Counseling
International Nutrition: Social and Environmental Policies
Community Nutrition
Principles of Epidemiology in Nutritional Sciences
Issues in Nutrition and Health
Selected Topics in Nutritional Sciences (Topic 4: Obesity and Metabolic Health)
Introduction to Public Health
Global Health
Environmental Health
Public Health Research
Health Behavior Theory and Practice
Health Policy and Health Systems
Public Health Internship
Medicine, Ethics, and Society
Social Psychology
Behavior Problems of Children
Selected Topics in Psychology (Topic 4: Health Psychology)
Psychology of Sex
Abnormal Psychology
Mental Illness and the Brain
Social Work Practice in Organizations and Communities
Current Social Work Topics (Topic 5: Facilitating Dialogues on LGBTQ Oppression)
Current Social Work Topics (Topic 9: Loss and Grief: Individual and Family Perspectives)
Gender, Race, and Class in American Society
Introduction to the Sociology of Health and Well-Being
Women's Reproductive Health for Nonscience Majors
Global Health Issues and Health Systems
Sociology of Health and Illness
Health Policy and Health Systems
Social Context of Public Health
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
Statistics in Health Care
Statistical Models for the Health and Behavioral Sciences
Plan II Junior Seminar (Topic: Public Health, Medicine, and Social Policy)
Topics in Urban Society and Culture (Topic 10: Human Behavior and Social Environment)
Human Behavior and Social Environment
Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 7: Women's Reproductive Health for Nonscience Majors)
Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 20: Fertility and Reproduction)
Fertility and Reproduction
Introductory Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 21: Gender, Race, Class in American Societies)
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies in the Social Sciences (Topic 1: Sociology of Gender)
Sociology of Gender
Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 3: Women in Sickness and Health)
Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (Topic 35: Psychosocial Issues Women's Health)
Six additional upper-division hours from the above areas of which three hours must be from outside the student’s major college6
Please Note:
A grade of at least a C- (or CR for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis) is required in each course counted toward fulfillment of the minor requirements.

Journalism Minor

The Journalism Minor affords undergraduate students across the University the opportunity to study a range of courses that will help prepare them for the digital communication economy. These include writing clearly and succinctly; telling stories in multiple formats, including audio, video and data visualizations; thinking critically about issues that affect both media and society; communicating through social media platforms; and understanding how journalism influences the way individuals and groups are perceived.

In order to apply for a Journalism Minor, a student must have at least a 2.75 GPA and have completed Journalism 301F and earned at least a B-. The School reserves the right to limit the number of students accepted as Journalism Minors. If demand exceeds space available, students will be selected based on a review of academic record, particularly performance in Journalism 301F. At least 12 hours must be taken in residence and for a letter grade (no pass/fail). Participating students must have a 2.5 GPA overall at the end of each academic year in order to continue in the minor.

The minor program requires 15 hours of coursework, including at least six upper-division hours. Students must fulfill the following requirements:

RequirementsHours
J 301FFundamental Issues in Journalism 13
J 302FDigital Storytelling Basics3
Nine additional hours from the following: 29
Reporting: Words
Reporting: Images
Podcasting
Media Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Web Production and Editing
Explanatory Journalism: Storytelling in a Digital Age
Oral History in Multimedia Storytelling
Social Media Journalism
Lifestyle Journalism
Music Journalism
Long-Form Feature Writing
Writing for Online News Audiences
Understanding African Americans and the Media
Minorities and the Media
Reporting the World: A Critical Examination of the United States News Media
Domestic Issues and Global Perspective
Reporting Latin America
Gender and the News
Media Law
Journalism, Society, and the Citizen Journalist
Ethics in Journalism
Historical Perspectives in Journalism
Journalism and Press Freedom in Latin America
Living in the Information Age
Online Incivility
Popular Culture and the Press
Please Note
Successful completion of Journalism 310F with a grade of B- or better is required before taking the following courses:
Podcasting
Media Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Web Production and Editing
Explanatory Journalism: Storytelling in a Digital Age
Lifestyle Journalism
Music Journalism
Long-Form Feature Writing
Writing for Online News Audiences
Reporting the World: A Critical Examination of the United States News Media
Reporting Latin America
Gender and the News
Ethics in Journalism

1. Students must receive at least a B- in Journalism 301F in order to be considered for acceptance into the minor

2. At least two courses must be upper-division

Media and Entertainment Industries Minor

The minor in Media and Entertainment Industries will provide undergraduates with an understanding of how the media and entertainment industries operate. Students will survey the histories, structures, and contemporary work practices of the media and entertainment industries. They will learn about the activities of media organizations and how media professionals navigate a rapidly changing industrial environment. The minor is designed to prepare students for careers within and related to a range of media and entertainment industries and professions including film, television, social and mobile media, and gaming, among other possibilities. Students will be exposed to a range of employment opportunities in both the private and public sectors at a time when the media landscape is undergoing rapid transformations both nationally and internationally. 

The Media and Entertainment Industries minor allows students from a range of majors across the University to interact in class, engage in experiential learning, enhance their employment qualifications, and generally prepare them to be leaders in these dynamically evolving industries. The minor also allows enough flexibility for students to customize their study to focus on areas of the media and entertainment industries of great interest to them.

This program is open only to students who are not majoring in Radio-Television-Film. Applicants must have a 2.5 cumulative grade point average. The Radio-Television-Film Department reserves the right to limit the number of students accepted as Media and Entertainment Industries minors. If demand exceeds space available, students will be selected based such factors as GPA, prior coursework taken, prior experience in the field, and response to essay prompts. Acceptance into the minor does not come with preference or guarantee of a seat in any RTF course.

The minor requires 15 hours of coursework, with at least nine hours being upper-division and at least nine hours completed in residence. All courses must be taken for a letter grade, unless the course is only offered on the pass/fail basis.  Only courses with a C- or better (or CR for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis) will be counted toward the minor.

Courses that appear in multiple lists may only be counted once. If a student chooses to take a six-hour internship course, only three of the hours may count toward the minor. Only three hours of non-internship coursework taken during the Semester in Los Angeles Program may be counted toward the minor. Students must petition the internship coordinator in advance if they wish to substitute another internship course number in place of Radio-Television-Film 330N.

Students must take the following coursework:

RequirementsHours
RTF 303CIntroduction to Media and Entertainment Industries3
Three hours from the following:3
Internship in Media Industries
The Business of Hollywood
Semester in Los Angeles Internship
Semester in Los Angeles Internship
Producing Film and Television
Nine hours from the following: 9
Introduction to World Cinema History
Development of Film and Media
History of American Television
Introduction to Global Media
Film, Video, and Television Theory (Topic 8: Transmedia Storytelling)
Introduction to Screenwriting
Television Analysis and Criticism (Topic 3: Contemporary Television Criticism)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 1: Global Hollywood)
Studies in Film History (Topic 7: British Film and Television)
The Business of Media (Topic 3: The Entertainment Industry: The Big Picture)
The Business of Hollywood
Studies in Media Industries (Topic 2: Development Process of Film and Television-Los Angeles)
Studies in Media Industries (Topic 3: Inside the Music Industry-Los Angeles)
Studies in Media Industries (Topic 4: New Media and Emerging Entertainment-Los Angeles)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 3: Asian American Media Cultures)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 13: Latin American Television)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 9: Media Industries and Entrepreneurship)
Media and Policy (Topic 1: Media, Communication Law, and Ethics)
Producing Film and Television
Advanced Topics in Media Studies (Topic 1: Media and Popular Culture)

Media Studies Minor

With the Media Studies minor, students will gain the analytical tools necessary for critical analysis of film, television, and digital media forms within the broader intellectual framework of the humanities and social sciences. Students in the minor will have the opportunity to examine film, broadcasting, games, and mobile media in a range of historical, sociocultural, creative, and industrial contexts. Courses cover diverse topics including global, regional, and national perspectives on the media; authorship, genre, and ideology; representations of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class; and digital media culture, technologies, policies, and design. As a complement to a major area of study, a minor in media studies can offer deep insight into how media and society interact, and prepare students for a range of careers. 

This program is open only to students who are not majoring in RTF. Applicants must have a 2.5 cumulative grade point average. The Radio-Television-Film Department reserves the right to limit the number of students accepted as Media Studies minors. If demand exceeds space available, students will be selected based on a review of the applicant’s academic record. Acceptance into the minor does not come with preference or guarantee of a seat in any RTF course.

The minor requires 15 hours of coursework, and at least nine hours completed in residence. Courses that appear in multiple groupings may only be counted once. All courses must be taken for a letter grade, unless the course is only offered on the pass/fail basis. Only courses with a C- or better (or CR for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis) will be counted toward the minor.

Production and screenwriting courses offered in the Radio-Television-Film Department do not count toward the Media Studies minor.

Students must take the following coursework:

RequirementsHours
Three hours from the following: 3
Introduction to World Cinema History
Media and Society
Development of Film and Media
Six hours from the following:6
History of American Television
Film History to 1960
Film History 1960 to Present
Screening Race
Introduction to Global Media
Tech Culture
Gender and Media Culture
Six hours from the following:6
History of American Television
Film History to 1960
Film History 1960 to Present
Screening Race
Introduction to Global Media
Tech Culture
Digital Remix Cultures
Gender and Media Culture
Introduction to Research Methods
Film, Video, and Television Theory (Topic 5: Screen Theory)
Film, Video, and Television Theory (Topic 7: Stardom and Celebrity Culture)
Film, Video, and Television Theory (Topic 8: Transmedia Storytelling)
New Communication Technologies (Topic 1: Digital Media and Design)
The Information Society (Topic 1: Information Society and Beyond)
Topics in New Communication Technologies (Topic 3: Internet Cultures)
Topics in New Communication Technologies (Topic 4: Video Game Culture and Criticism)
Television Analysis and Criticism (Topic 2: Race, Class and Gender in American Television)
Television Analysis and Criticism (Topic 3: Contemporary Television Criticism)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 1: National Media Systems)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 2: Comparative Media Systems)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 7: Global Media Systems)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 8: Development Communication and Social Change)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 1: Global Hollywood)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 2: Indian Cinema)
Studies in Film History (Topic 3: History of Mexican Cinema)
Studies in Film History (Topic 7: British Film and Television)
Studies in Film History (Topic 8: Social Documentary)
Studies in Film History (Topic 9: Women Behind the Camera)
Studies in Film History (Topic 10: Chinese Auteurs)
Experimental Media and the Art of Disruption
The Business of Media (Topic 3: The Entertainment Industry: The Big Picture)
The Business of Hollywood
Global Media and Area Studies (Topic 1: Media and the Middle East)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 3: Asian American Media Cultures)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 5: Social Media: Growth, Uses, and Impacts)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 6: Gender, Race, and Sexuality in Sports Media)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 7: Race and Digital Media Culture)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 8: Latina/os and U.S. Media)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 9: Latina Feminisms and Media)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 10: Gender and Media in the '60's)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 11: Brazilian Media)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 12: Gender and Fan Culture)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 13: Latin American Television)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 14: Latino Images in Film)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 8: Migration and Media)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 9: Media Industries and Entrepreneurship)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 10: Globalization and Social Media)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 12: Mapping Latino Culture in East Austin)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 13: Activist Media)
Media and Policy (Topic 1: Media, Communication Law, and Ethics)
Media Literacy (Topic 2: Children, Youth, and Media)
Media Literacy (Topic 3: Media Literacy and Civic Engagement)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 1: Comedy in Film and Media)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 2: Animation Studios)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 3: Asian Horror Film)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 4: Film Noir)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 5: Films of Clint Eastwood)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 6: Films of Alfred Hitchcock)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 7: Films of Martin Scorsese)
Film Analysis and Criticism (Topic 8: Independent American Cinema)
Advanced Topics in Media Studies (Topic 1: Media and Popular Culture)
Advanced Topics in Media Studies (Topic 2: Queer Media Studies)
Advanced Topics in Media Studies with Screenings (Topic 1: Landscape Cinema)

Science Communication Minor

The Science Communication Minor is designed to help prepare students with undergraduate studies in a sciences-related field to effectively communicate science topics to a variety of audiences by utilizing professional communication techniques and tools. Students will gain an understanding of contemporary communication issues that may impact their field, and gain advanced skills to enhance their communication with the public, whether through traditional media, new media, or in person. This program is open only to students with majors in the College of Natural Sciences or the Moody College of Communication. To declare the Science Communication minor, a student must have at least a cumulative 2.5 grade point average.

The minor requires 18 semester hours of coursework. Nine hours must be taken at the upper-division level and at least nine hours must be taken in residence.

The minor requirements are:

RequirementsHours
ADV 323Public Communication of Science and Techology3
Three hours of coursework chosen from the following list of approved Foundations courses:3
Fundamentals of Advertising
Communicating Sustainability
Fundamentals of Public Relations
Professional Communication Skills
Organizational Communication
Interpersonal Communication Theory
Theories of Persuasion
Nonverbal Communication
Political Communication
Media Effects and Politics
Fundamental Issues in Journalism
Three hours of coursework from the following list of approved Skills courses:3
Creative Communication of Scientific Research
Interviewing Principles and Practices
Advanced Presentation Skills
Building Sales Relationships
Communicating to Government
Crowds, Clouds, and Community
Social Media and Organizations
Work360
Advanced Organizational Communication
Communication Internship (Topic 4: Science Communication Internship)
Multimedia News Reporting
Social Media Journalism
Reporting on the Environment
Three hours of coursework from the following list of Ethics and Leadership courses:3
Introduction to Communication and Leadership
Communication Ethics
Argumentation and Advocacy
Leadership Stories
Lying and Deception
Communication for Innovation
Six additional hours of coursework chosen from Foundations, Skills, and Ethics and Leadership courses6
Please Note:
All courses must be taken for a letter grade, and only courses with a grade of C- or better (or CR for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis) will be counted.
Students pursuing the minor may enroll in any of the approved courses for which he or she meets the prerequisite. Prerequisites for journalism courses may be waived after consultation and consent of the instructor. However, it is recommended that students take Journalism 310F prior to 346F.

Sports Media Minor

The Sports Media Minor is designed to complement a student’s education by developing his or her proficiency and knowledge in the area of sports media. A student may enroll in any of the courses for which he or she meets the prerequisites.

The minor requires 18 semester hours of coursework. Nine hours must be taken at the upper-division level and at least nine hours must be taken in residence. Students must earn a grade of at least C- (or CR for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis) in each course.

The requirements are:

RequirementsHours
COM 323Communication Internship (Topic 1: Sports Media Internship)3
ADV 305SIntroduction to Integrated Communication for Sports3
or P R 305S Introduction to Integrated Communication for Sports
ADV 348SThe Business of Sports Media3
or P R 348S The Business of Sports Media
or J 348G The Business of Sports Media
Nine hours of coursework to be selected from:
Special Topics in Sports Media (Topic 8: College Sports Media)
Special Topics in Sports Media (Topic 9: Sports Contract Negotiation Techniques)
Special Topics in Sports Media (Topic 11:Sports and Social Media)
Special Topics in Sports Media (Topic 12: Sports Audiences)
Rhetoric of Popular Culture
Reporting Sports
Sociological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity
Sport and Event Marketing
Media and Public Relations in Sport

Please Note: Additional electives may be offered on a semester-by-semester basis. 

US Latino and Latin American Media Studies Minor

This concentration is designed to introduce students to United States Latino and Latin American issues in communication and the media and to give them the opportunity to prepare for professional work related to these areas in addition to their major. The minor requires 18 hours of coursework, including at least nine hours completed in residence. Students must fulfill the following requirements:

RequirementsHours
RTF 306Introduction to World Cinema History 13
or RTF 307 Media and Society
RTF 323CScreening Race3
Six hours of upper-division elective coursework chosen from the following:6
International Advertising
Reporting en Espanol
Oral History as Journalism
Oral History in Multimedia Storytelling
Minorities and the Media
Reporting Latin America
Journalism and Press Freedom in Latin America
Film History 1960 to Present
Introduction to Global Media
Television Analysis and Criticism (Topic 2: Race, Class and Gender in American Television)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 7: Global Media Systems)
Topics in Global Media (Topic 1: Global Hollywood)
Studies in Film History (Topic 3: History of Mexican Cinema)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 7: Race and Digital Media Culture)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 8: Latina/os and U.S. Media)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 9: Latina Feminisms and Media)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 12: Gender and Fan Culture)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 13: Latin American Television)
Studies in Media and Culture (Topic 14: Latino Images in Film)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 8: Migration and Media)
Topics in Media and Society (Topic 12: Mapping Latino Culture in East Austin)
Introductory Production (Topic 4: East Austin Stories)
Six additional hours of upper or lower division elective coursework in Latin American Studies or Mexican American Studies6
Please Note:
All courses must be taken for a letter grade, and only courses with a grade of C- or better (or CR for courses offered only on a pass/fail basis) will be counted.

1. Radio-Television-Film 306 should be taken by non-RTF majors and Radio-Television-Film 307 should be taken by RTF majors

This program is open to all undergraduate students at The University of Texas at Austin. Certain course prerequisites, for approved courses in the Moody College of Communication, may be waived once the student is accepted to the program.

Each degree program in the Moody College of Communication imposes a limit on the number of hours in the College that may be counted toward the degree; each also imposes limits on the number of hours in the major that may be counted. For students who complete the US Latino and Latin American Media Studies minor, these limits may be modified with the approval of the Student Advising Office.

Visual Media Minor

The Visual Media Minor affords undergraduate students across the University the opportunity to increase their visual literacy and skills, particularly in the areas of photography, photojournalism, video storytelling, and graphic design. In addition, students study the foundations of journalism ethics and learn techniques to approach ethical decisions within the field of visual media.

In order to apply for a Visual Media Minor, a student must have at least 2.5 GPA and have completed Communication 316. If demand exceeds space available, students will be selected based on a review of academic record, particularly performance in Communication 316, as well as a review of their visual portfolio. The School of Journalism reserves the right to limit the number of students accepted as Visual Media Minors. Participating students must have a 2.5 GPA overall at the end of each academic year in order to continue in the minor. This minor is not available to students majoring in Journalism.

The minor program requires 15 hours of coursework, at least 12 of which must be completed in residence, with at least six taken at the upper-division level. All courses must be taken for a letter grade, unless a course is only offered on a pass/fail basis. Students must fulfill the following requirements:

RequirementsHours
COM 316Photographic Communication3
J 352FEthics in Journalism3
Nine additional hours to be selected from these courses: 9
Reporting: Images
Advanced Photo Editing and Design
Intermediate Photographic Communication
Advanced Visual Journalism: Photo
Photography for Reporting Texas
Advanced Visual Journalism: Video
Graphic Design for Print and Online
Documentary Tradition of Latin America
Cultural Survey of Photography

Courses for Teacher Preparation

The college does not currently offer a teaching certification program for any of its degrees. Students who wish to pursue teacher certification should consult the teacher certification officer in the College of Education.