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Department of Kinesiology and Health Education

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Health Education: HED

Upper-Division Courses

HED 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L. Fieldwork in Health Promotion.

Applied experiences in development, delivery, or evaluation of professional health promotion programs. For 127L, one conference hour and two hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 227L, one conference hour and five hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 327L, one conference hour and eight hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 627L, one conference hour and seventeen hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. No more than twelve semester hours in the following courses may be counted: Health Education 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L, Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, consent of the director of the degree program in kinesiology, and a University grade point average of at least 2.50. A higher grade point average may be required.

HED 628. Internship in Health Promotion.

Applied experiences in development, delivery, or evaluation of professional health promotion programs. One conference hour and seventeen hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, consent of the director of the degree program in kinesiology, and a University grade point average of at least 2.50. A higher grade point average may be required.

HED 329K. Child, Adolescent, and Adult Health.

Restricted to students in the College of Education. The foundations of child, adolescent, and adult health; health education; and the biological, environmental, and behavioral health determinants of health. Includes the application of evidence-based child, adolescent, and adult health promotion concepts; prominent health risk behaviors established during youth that increase the risk of morbidity and mortality; and the application of personal health and wellness information. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Health Education 329, 329K, Kinesiology 333.

HED 335. Theories of Substance Use and Abuse.

An introduction to the psychological, social, pharmacological, and cultural aspects of substance use and abuse. Includes a study and critique of the theories of substance use and abuse. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Health Education 335 and Kinesiology 367 may not both be counted.

HED 343. Foundations of Epidemiology.

Designed to familiarize students with the basic tenets of epidemiology, as well as to provide an introduction to the different types of epidemiological study designs. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Health Education 343 and Kinesiology 377 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HED 352K. Studies in Health: Topical Studies.

Analysis and synthesis of the literature and discussion of current and specific issues in health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Laboratory work is required for some topics; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 2: Psychosocial Issues in Women's Health. Psychosocial issues in women's physical and mental health. Includes a broad definition of women's health that considers traditional reproductive issues, disorders that are more common in women than in men, and the leading causes of death in women. Covers gender influences on health risk behaviors, and societal influences on women's health through a consideration of social norms and roles. Health Education 352K (Topic 2) and Kinesiology 352K (Topic 7: Psychosocial Issues in Women's Health) may not both be counted.
Topic 3: Psychosocial Issues in Adult Development and Health. Examines psychosocial issues in adult physical and mental health within the context of adult psychological development, using a biopsychosocial approach. Examines psychosocial factors in the major health risks in adulthood and in preventative health behavior. Also considers psychosocial factors in stress and coping and their implications for health. Health Education 352K (Topic 3) and Kinesiology 352K (Topic 16: Psychosocial Issues in Adult Development and Health) may not both be counted.

HED 366. Human Sexuality.

Analysis of the physiological, psychological, and social factors in human sexuality. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Health Education 366 and Kinesiology 366 may not both be counted.

HED 370K. Topical Seminar in Health Promotion.

Identification, causes, incidence, prevention, control, and social implications of major problems in health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Foundations of Health Promotion I. Introduction to the field of health promotion, as applicable in the fields of health and education: theories, processes, activities, and settings for health promotion practice. Health Education 370K (Topic 1) and Kinesiology 370K (Topic 2: Introduction to Health Promotion) may not both be counted.
Topic 2: Adolescent Health Risk Behavior. Overview of the biological, psychological, social, and environmental determinants of adolescent risk-taking behavior. Risk behaviors of interest will include outcomes stemming from unintentional injuries, intentional injuries (self injury, suicide), tobacco use, alcohol and other drug use, diet, sedentary behavior, and pathological gambling. Health Education 370K (Topic 2) and Kinesiology 370K (Topic 3: Adolescent Health Risk Behavior) may not both be counted.
Topic 3: Environmental Health. Provides an introduction to the key areas of environmental health in developed and developing countries. Using the perspectives of the population and community, the course will cover factors associated with the development of environmental health problems.

HED 371K. Foundations of Health Promotion II.

Introduction to the processes of planning, implementing, and evaluating health promotion programs. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Health Education 352K (Topic 1: Foundations of Health Promotion II), 371K, Kinesiology 352K (Topic 14: Techniques of Health Promotion). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Health Education 370K (Topic 1: Foundations of Health Promotion I).

HED 373. Evaluation and Research Design.

Research methods and program evaluations in health promotion settings. Topics include types of experimental and non-experimental research, validity, reliability, experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, data collection procedures, measurement of health knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, data analysis, and the presentation of results. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Health Education 373 and Kinesiology 373 may not both be counted.

HED 178C, 278C, 378C, 678C. Fieldwork in Health.

Undergraduate research and/or experience with a health agency in the field attempting to analyze or solve community health problems through education; students are supervised by the health agency and by the kinesiology and health education faculty. For each semester hour of credit earned, two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

Kinesiology: KIN

Lower-Division Courses

KIN 310. Physiological Basis of Conditioning.

Analysis and discussion of current issues and theories of physical conditioning. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Kinesiology 310, 339, 352K (Topic 2: Physiological Basis of Conditioning).

KIN 311K. Sport Psychology.

The psychological response to sport-related stress and the influence of psychological variables on sport performance and coaching. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

KIN 312. Issues in Kinesiology: Topical Studies.

Analysis and discussion of current issues within the discipline of kinesiology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Additional hours may be required for some topics; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 2 (TCCN: PHED 2356): Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. Principles of athletic training, including mechanisms, signs and symptoms, treatments, and basic rehabilitation of athletic injuries and illnesses. Three lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.
Topic 3: Fundamentals of Coaching. An introduction to the principles and practices of coaching as they relate to the integration of sports science, practice structure and design, and the development of a coaching philosophy. Involves group work and field experience with youth athletic organizations. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 316.
Topic 4: Philosophy and Leadership in Sport & Physical Activity.

KIN 312G. Golf Instruction.

Designed to train students to teach the game of golf. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional fieldwork hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 312M. Management of Physical Activity and Sport Programs.

Introductory survey of the field of sport management. Examines various types of sport organizations and introduces the student to practices in marketing, management, sport law, and basic finance. Includes sport-specific management challenges, particularly events and facilities, and considerations for the future, such as social issues. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

KIN 213. Safety Information and Procedures.

Factors affecting human safety; techniques and procedures to promote and ensure safe living. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1 (TCCN: PHED 1206): First Aid.
Topic 2: Water Safety Instruction. Restricted to Kinesiology and Health Education majors; open to others with consent of instructor. Trains instructor candidates to teach courses in swimming and water safety by developing their understanding of how to use the course materials, conduct training sessions and evaluate participants' progress. Students will be introduced to several swimming strokes, springboard diving, cardiovascular conditioning, exercise physiology, nutrition, personal safety. Elementary rescue skills and basic snorkeling techniques. Culminates in American Red Cross certification. Prerequisite: swimming proficiency and confidence in deep water.
Topic 3: Lifeguarding.
Topic 4: Lifeguarding Instruction.

KIN 314 (TCCN: PHED 1331). Children's Movement.

Introduction to children's movement, physical activity, and fitness; professional standards, policy, and legislation; physiological principles and learning principles. Movement skills and appropriate teaching strategies to provide future teachers with the knowledge and skills to provide and support positive, effective physical education classes for children. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, including off-campus observation of children's movement programs. Prerequisite: Fifteen semester hours of college coursework.

KIN 315. Motor Learning.

Psychological factors affecting performance and acquisition of motor skills. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301.

KIN 316. Structure and Organization of Sport Programs.

Introduction to sport management and effective organizational behavior for sport programs. Analysis of the dynamic management process necessary for the improvement of organizational productivity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated once for credit.

KIN 217. Advanced Scuba Diving Leadership.

Designed to prepare experienced scuba divers to instruct, organize, and conduct safe, appropriate-level dives for certified divers. Also designed to prepare students to apply for certification as a National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) Assistant Instructor or Divemaster. Three lecture or open-water hours a week, and three internship hours a week for one semester participating in the training of entry-level students. Prerequisite: Certification as a scuba rescue diver and as a National Association of Underwater Instructor (NAUI) Master Scuba Diver, or equivalent knowledge and experience.

KIN 119. Movement Competence.

Acquisition and knowledge of techniques, with emphasis on learning mechanical and perceptual principles, rules, strategy, and officiating. The equivalent of three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: A major or minor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education.

Topic 1: Archery.
Topic 2: Ballet.
Topic 3: Bowling.
Topic 4: Diving.
Topic 5: Fencing.
Topic 6: Golf.
Topic 7: Scuba Diving.
Topic 8: Swimming. Designed for kinesiology and health education majors. Development of swimming techniques including instruction in seven swimming strokes, springboard diving, cardiovascular conditioning, exercise physiology concepts, nutrition, personal safety, elementary rescue skills, CPR/AED and basic snorkeling techniques. Provides preparation for American Red Cross certification. Additional prerequisite: Comfortable in deep water and able to swim two lengths using two strokes, or consent of instructor.
Topic 10: Conditioning. Basic principles involved in designing a sound conditioning program emphasizing resistance training techniques. Additional Prerequisite: Physical Education 106C (Topic 7: Weight Training), or consent of instructor.
Topic 11: Rhythmic Activities and Dance. Designed for applied movement science majors, and kinesiology and health education majors. Introduces a variety of movement and dance activities that can be used to teach rhythm to youth.
Topic 12: Gymnastics.
Topic 13: Manipulative Activities.
Topic 14: Tennis. Introduction to methods, progressions, strategies, and teaching cues appropriate for playing, teaching, and coaching basic tennis.
Topic 15: Volleyball. Introduction to methods, progressions, and teaching cues appropriate for playing, teaching, and coaching basic volleyball.
Topic 16: Social Dance. Designed for applied movement science majors, and kinesiology and health education majors. Introduction to popular social partner dances such as swing, waltz, tango, two-step and more. Emphasis on connecting with a dance partner and the art of both leading and following. Optional dance labs for additional practice are offered.
Topic 17: Basketball. Designed for applied movement science majors, and kinesiology and health education majors. Introduces methods, progressions, strategies and teaching cues appropriate for playing, teaching, and coaching basic basketball.
Topic 18: Adventure Activities. Includes basic skills needed to participate in outdoor/adventure activities. Participants will learn methods, progressions, drills, and performance cues appropriate for participating in and leading outdoor/adventure activities. Includes off-campus activities. Additional prerequisite: Kinesiology 119 (Topic 8: Swimming) and lifeguard, water safety instructor, or swimming level II certification.
Topic 19: Kinesthetic Awareness and Core Body Development. Introduces basic movement skills from simple to more complex, and how they relate to more advanced sport skills through developmental gymnastics, yoga, Pilates, and martial arts. Additional prerequisite: A major in applied movement science.

KIN 219D. Movement Analysis: Dual Activities.

Application of biomechanics and motor learning principles to the analysis of selected movement activities, with particular emphasis on dual sports. Two lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: A major in applied movement science.

KIN 219G. Advanced Golf.

Designed for the advanced golfer. Includes technical swing analysis and instruction, course management and course play, and tournament play. Two lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional fieldwork hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, and a certified Professional Golfers Association (PGA) handicap of 15 or below or equivalent proficiency.

KIN 219K. Athletics.

Knowledge and skills required for officials, coaches, and athletic trainers of interschool sports. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 1: Coaching.
Topic 2: Officiating.
Topic 3: Introduction to Athletic Training. An introduction to athletic training principles and theories, including the prevention, recognition, and management of athletic injuries and illnesses. Includes basic skill development in areas such as first aid, emergency care, and supportive taping, wrapping, and bracing. Requires a one-day first aid and CPR workshop.

KIN 219S. Movement Analysis: Individual Activities.

Restricted to kinesiology and health education majors. Application of movement skill analysis and biomechanical principles, physical laws of movement, fitness training principles and programs, exercise physiology, performance techniques, and skill progressions in individual activities and sport. Two lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester.

KIN 219T. Movement Analysis: Team Activities.

Restricted to kinesiology and health education majors. Application of scientific and psychosocial aspects of team sports, basic mechanical principles, and basic progressions relevant to performing and teaching selected team sport skills. Students also learn basic strategies and tasks related to coaching and organizing a team. Two lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester.

Upper-Division Courses

KIN 320. Applied Biomechanics of Human Movement.

Designed to provide students with an understanding of applied scientific analysis of movement. Examines the physiological, structural, and mechanical bases for human movement, with examples drawn from sport and rehabilitation. Lectures concentrate on a scientific approach to mechanisms underlying human movement and to strategies and practices of clinical and sport applications. Laboratory sessions focus on both theoretical and applied aspects of selected mechanical concepts. Three lecture hours and one and one half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 324K, and Mathematics 305G or the equivalent.

KIN 321M. Motor Development and Performance.

Development of fundamental motor patterns and skills from birth to adolescence; factors that influence motor skill development, such as growth, maturation, and neural and physiological mechanisms. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

KIN 322. Diagnosis and Evaluation of Fitness.

Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 310, 324K, and 325K.

KIN 324K. Applied Human Anatomy.

Combines the study of systematic and regional human anatomy. Includes applications of the skeletal system, and attachments and actions of muscles, with an emphasis on the mechanics of support and motion and their clinical applications. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Biology 478L and Kinesiology 324K may not both be counted.

KIN 325K. Physiology of Exercise.

Application of principles of physiology to muscular activities. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 324K or a course in human physiology.

KIN 226. Advanced Weight Training.

Explores various advanced techniques of weight training, with emphasis on the lifts used in the competitive strength sports of weightlifting and powerlifting. Includes plyometrics and functional training movements for athletic enhancement. Two lecture hours a week for one semester.

KIN 326K. Kinesiology: Biomechanical Analysis of Movement.

Study of the principles of equilibrium, force, and motion as applied to human movement. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 324K, Mathematics 408C, and Physics 302K.

KIN 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L. Fieldwork.

Supervised fieldwork or clinical work in appropriate activities. For 127L, one conference hour and two hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 227L, one conference hour and five hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 327L, one conference hour and eight hours of fieldwork a week for one semester; for 627L, one conference hour and seventeen hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit up to twelve semester hours. No more than twelve semester hours in this course may be counted. No more than twelve semester hours in the following courses may be counted: Health Education 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L, Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L. No more than twelve semester hours in the following courses may be counted: Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L, 628. Students taking Kinesiology 127L, 227L, or 327L as an elective outside the major must register on the pass/fail basis; those using it to fulfill a degree requirement must register on the letter-grade basis; those taking it as an elective within the major may register on either the pass/fail or the letter-grade basis. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, consent of the director of the degree program in kinesiology, and a University grade point average of at least 2.50. A higher grade point average may be required. Students will be dropped from the course if they have not obtained the director's consent in advance.

Topic 3: Aiding in Fitness Leadership.
Topic 4: Fieldwork in Kinesiology.
Topic 5: Personal Training.
Topic 6: Clinical Exercise Testing.
Topic 8: Teaching Physical Education. Introduction to the mission and standards for quality physical education. Designed to aid in career choice and the opportunity to experience teaching with master teachers in the school. Includes off-campus instruction with physical education teachers in elementary and secondary school physical education programs.
Topic 9: Sensory Motor Integration. Students participate in The Autism Project (TAP) to explore evidence-based practices and service learning options used with children and adults on the autism spectrum. Additional prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Topic 10: Laboratory Research in Kinesiology.

KIN 628. Fieldwork in Sport Management.

Twenty-seven hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated once for credit. No more than twelve semester hours in the following courses may be counted: Kinesiology 127L, 227L, 327L, 627L, 628. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 2.50, completion of an online test, and consent of the faculty adviser.

KIN 330E. Sport Nutrition.

The nutritional needs of people whose physical activity ranges from recreational to elite competitive athletics. Development of practical dietary strategies based upon understanding how macronutrients, vitamins, minerals, and water are digested and absorbed for metabolism. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 330E and 352K (Topic 13: Sport Nutrition) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Chemistry 314N or a course in human physiology.

KIN 331. Physical Aging in America.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 331 and 352K (Topic: Physical Aging in America) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Kinesiology 310, 315, or 325K; and six additional semester hours of coursework in kinesiology.

KIN 332. Techniques of Fitness Leadership.

Practical application of theoretical content from exercise physiology, anatomy, and biomechanics. Emphasis on program design and development for healthy adults and special populations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional laboratory hours to be arranged. Kinesiology 332 and 352K (Topic 12: Techniques of Fitness Leadership) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 310 or 325K.

KIN 334. Children's Exercise and Physical Activity.

Children's changing capacity for performance in exercise and sport. Includes performance changes as a function of physical growth and maturation, physiological response to activity and training, the relationship between children's health and adult health, and the psychosocial parameters that influence participation in physical activity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 334 and 352K (Topic 8: Children's Exercise and Physical Activity) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 310.

KIN 336. Neuromuscular Control.

Central and peripheral nervous system control of human muscular contractions and limb movement. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 324K, or a course in human physiology.

KIN 338. Motor Development and Assessment.

Training in screening, diagnostic, and programmatic motor assessment instruments. Designed to give students practical experience in assessing physical and motoric development in children with and without disabilities. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 338 and 352K (Topic 9: Motor Development: Assessment) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 321M; Kinesiology 360 is recommended.

KIN 340. Modern Olympic Movement in World Affairs.

Examination of the place of the modern Olympic movement in world affairs. The cultural, political, and economic dynamics of this relationship will receive special emphasis.

KIN 140C. Practicum in Athletic Training: Level 1A.

Supervised clinical experiences in the application of concepts, theories, and techniques associated with the prevention, recognition, and immediate care of injuries and illnesses suffered by athletic and physically active populations. Students use cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills and knowledge to complete a prescribed set of educational competencies and clinical proficiencies under the direction of an approved clinical instructor. One lecture hour and twenty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 140D. Practicum in Athletic Training: Level 1B.

Supervised clinical experiences in the application of concepts, theories, and techniques associated with the prevention, recognition, immediate care, and treatment of injuries and illnesses suffered by athletic and physically active populations. Emphasizes the application of therapeutic modalities and soft-tissue therapy techniques. Students use cognitive psychomotor and affective skills and knowledge to complete a prescribed set of educational competencies and clinical proficiencies under the direction of an approved clinical instructor. One lecture hour and twenty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 140E. Practicum in Athletic Training: Level 2A.

Supervised clinical experiences in the application of concepts, theories, and techniques associated with the prevention, recognition, immediate care, treatment, evaluation, and diagnosis of injuries and illnesses suffered by athletic and physically active populations. Emphasizes clinical evaluation and assessment techniques. Students use cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills and knowledge to complete a prescribed set of educational competencies and clinical proficiencies under the direction of an approved clinical instructor. One lecture hour and twenty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 140F. Practicum in Athletic Training: Level 2B.

Supervised clinical experiences in the application of concepts, theories, and techniques associated with the prevention, recognition, immediate care, treatment, evaluation, diagnosis, rehabilitation, and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses suffered by athletic and physically active populations. Emphasizes therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation procedures. Students use cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills and knowledge to complete a prescribed set of educational competencies and clinical proficiencies under the direction of an approved clinical instructor. One lecture hour and twenty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 140G. Practicum in Athletic Training: Level 3A.

Supervised clinical experiences in the application of concepts, theories, and techniques associated with the prevention, recognition, immediate care, treatment, evaluation, diagnosis, rehabilitation, and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses suffered by athletic and physically active populations. Emphasizes general medical conditions. Students use cognitive psychomotor and affective skills and knowledge to complete a prescribed set of educational competencies and clinical proficiencies under the direction of an approved clinical instructor. One lecture hour and twenty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 140J. Practicum in Athletic Training: Level 3B.

Supervised clinical experiences in the application of concepts, theories, and techniques associated with the prevention, recognition, immediate care, treatment, evaluation, diagnosis, rehabilitation, and reconditioning of injuries and illnesses suffered by athletic and physically active populations. Emphasizes the administrative and professional aspects of managing these conditions. Students use cognitive psychomotor and affective skills and knowledge to complete a prescribed set of education competencies and clinical proficiencies under the direction of an approved clinical instructor. One lecture hour and twenty hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 341. Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training.

The study and practice of using therapeutic modalities, including soft tissue and manual therapy techniques, to treat athletic injuries. Covers physiological effects, indications, contraindications, protocols, injury pathology, and tissue healing. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Kinesiology 341 and 352K (Topic 19: Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 312 (Topic 2: Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries), or consent of instructor.

KIN 342. Clinical Evaluation of Athletic Injuries in the Lower Body.

The study and practice of techniques involved in the evaluation of athletic injuries affecting the lower body. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Kinesiology 342 and 352K (Topic 22: Clinical Evaluation of Athletic Injuries in the Lower Body) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 312 (Topic 2: Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries) and 324K, and concurrent enrollment in Kinesiology 343; or consent of instructor.

KIN 343. Clinical Evaluation of Athletic Injuries in the Upper Body.

The study and practice of techniques involved in the evaluation of athletic injuries affecting the upper body. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Kinesiology 343 and 352K (Topic 15: Clinical Evaluation of Athletic Injuries in the Upper Body) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 312 (Topic 2: Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries) and 324K, and concurrent enrollment in Kinesiology 342; or consent of instructor.

KIN 344. Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation Techniques.

The study and practice of therapeutic exercise techniques and rehabilitation protocols in treating athletic injuries and illnesses. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Kinesiology 344 and 352K (Topic 24: Advanced Athletic Training: Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 324K and 342, or consent of instructor; credit or registration for Kinesiology 119 (Topic 10: Conditioning) and 226 or 363.

KIN 345. Topics in Athletic Training.

Presentations, including some by medical and allied medical specialists, covering topics in athletic training and sports medicine. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Kinesiology 345 and 352K (Topic 20: Topics in Athletic Training) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

KIN 346. Athletic Training Program Administration.

The study of organizational and administrative principles involved with athletic training programs. Includes legal issues, budgetary concerns, and policies and procedures. Also includes resume development and career planning. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 346 and 352K (Topic 21: Athletic Training Program Administration) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 219K (Topic 3: Introduction to Athletic Training), 341, 342, and 344; or consent of instructor.

KIN 347. Historical and Ethical Issues in Physical Culture and Sports.

Designed to provide an overview of the historical antecedents of the modern fitness movement and examine the intellectual and social motivations involved in the pursuit of health and physical fitness. Explores the history of sport science, how laboratory revelations lead to new fitness regimens, and ethical issues in the field of physical culture and sport, such as the use of ergogenic drugs, the social consequences of high performance sport, and professional ethics in the fields of kinesiology and health education. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

KIN 348. Psychological Aspects of Exercise.

Examines both the psychological benefits that accrue from exercise, such as reduced depression and stress, as well as the psychological predictors of exercise adherence. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 348 and 352K (Topic 17: Psychological Aspects of Exercise) may not both be counted.

KIN 349. History of Sport and Physical Activity.

Significant developments in sport and physical activity since prehistoric time; emphasis on events influencing contemporary American programs and the International Olympic Games. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 330 and 349 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

KIN 350. Sociological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 350 and 352K (Topic: Sociological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity) may not both be counted.

KIN 351. Philosophy of Sport and Physical Activity.

Designed to introduce the student to the ideas and methodologies of the philosophic exploration of play, sport, athletics, exercise, and the body. Emphasis on the study of sport and ethics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 329 and 351 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

KIN 352K. Studies in Human Movement: Topical Studies.

Analysis and synthesis of the literature and discussion of current and specific issues in kinesiology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Laboratory work is required for some topics; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 3: Women and Sport. Same as Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 5: Women and Sport).
Topic 5: Sport, Fitness, and Mass Media. Same as American Studies 322 (Topic 3: Sport, Fitness, and Mass Media).
Topic 6: Race and Sport in African American Life. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 374 (Topic 27: Race and Sport in African American Life) and Anthropology 324L (Topic 26: Race and Sport in African American Life). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

KIN 353. Sport Law.

Introduces the legal principles applicable to a variety of sport settings. Topics include tort liability, with a special emphasis on the effective management of risk; and constitutional law issues, focusing on the individual rights of amateur athletes and employees in sport organizations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 352K (Topic 25: Sport and Law) and 353 may not both be counted.

KIN 354. Sport and Event Marketing.

Application of the fundamental principles used in the marketing of sport and events. An introduction to service quality for increasing customer satisfaction and effectiveness of sport organizations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 352K (Topic 11: Sport and Event Promotion) and 354 may not both be counted.

KIN 355. Media and Public Relations in Sport.

Examination and application of the concepts of public and media relations to sport and leisure organizations. Topics include effective interpersonal communication, persuasion, media relations, publicity tactics, and writing and oral communications skills. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 352K (Topic 26: Media and Public Relations in Sport) and 355 may not both be counted.

KIN 356. Revenue and Budgeting in Sport.

Introduction to financial analysis and budgeting techniques in the context of sport organizations; conventional and innovative methods for the acquisition of revenue available to sport organizations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 352K (Topic 10: Revenue and Budgeting in Sport) and 356 may not both be counted.

KIN 357. Strategic Management of Sport Organizations.

Examination of management and service delivery systems in sport organizations. Designed to develop specific knowledge and management skills in the areas of human resources, events, facilities, and risk management. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 352K (Topic 4: Management of Sport and Health Promotion Programs) and 357 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 354 and 356.

KIN 360. Programming for People with Disabilities.

Restricted to students with a major or minor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education. Designed for Applied Movement Science majors. Course investigates programming options for people with disabilities in the area of sport, recreation, and community involvement. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional field observation hours to be arranged. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in kinesiology, or consent of instructor.

KIN 361. Coaching Theory and Principles I.

Examines the philosophy, ethics, strategies, motivational techniques, performance analysis, program organization, contest administration, and facilities management related to coaching. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 352 and 361 may not both be counted.

KIN 362. Coaching Theory and Principles II.

Examines the process of becoming a successful coach and developing a coaching protocol for a specific sport. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Kinesiology 352 and 362 may not both be counted.

KIN 363. Theory and Practice in Strength Coaching.

Explores the physiology and biomechanics of strength training and conditioning, as well as popular assessment protocols and exercise prescription principles. Additional areas include the organization and administration of a strength/conditioning facility, staff utilization, integration of weight training with other training techniques, and other standard strength coaching practices. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

KIN 364. Aquatic Facility Operator: Management and Administration.

Designed to prepare the aquatic professional for leadership in the management of indoor and outdoor facilities. Includes aquatic facility operation, administration of programs, physical operations, policies and procedures, and staff development and training. Includes design, pool operation, water chemistry, facility management, safety procedures and risk management, budgeting, and marketing aquatic programs. Studies educational, sport, and recreational aspects of pools, lakes, camps, and beachfronts. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

KIN 365. The Business of Golf.

Restricted to students in the College of Education. Designed for students pursuing a career in the golf business. Includes clubhouse and links management, sales, agronomy, technology, and equipment. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

KIN 370K. Topical Seminar in Health Promotion.

Identification, causes, incidence, prevention, control, and social implications of major problems in health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic and is given in the Course Schedule.

Topic 1: Emergency Medical Technology.

KIN 375. Issues and Trends in Developmental Movement Programs.

Introduction to issues related to the goals, organization, and success of developmental movement programs, such as school physical education, youth sports, YMCA, and other recreation programs and community activities. Issues include equity, competition, fitness, social development, safety and liability, and sportsmanship. Involves group work and observation and involvement in community programs. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester.

KIN 376. Measurement in Kinesiology.

Measurement and assessment procedures; application of statistical procedures; standards for authentic assessment; measurement/assessment selection and evaluation; use of technology in tracking development of motor skills and fitness. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in kinesiology.

KIN 178, 278, 378, 478, 578, 678, 778, 878, 978. Fieldwork in Health.

Undergraduate research and/or experience with a health agency in the field attempting to analyze or solve community health problems through education; supervision by the health agency and by the kinesiology and health education faculty. For each semester hour of credit earned, two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Some topics are offered on the pass/fail basis only; these are identified in the Course Schedule. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

Topic 1: Substance Abuse Prevention I.
Topic 2: Substance Abuse Prevention II.
Topic 3: Sexual Health I.
Topic 4: Substance Abuse Prevention III. Offered on the letter-grade basis only.

KIN 379H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Readings or a research project, under the supervision of a faculty member, in specific areas of research within kinesiology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: A University grade point average of at least 3.00 and consent of instructor.

Physical Education: PED

Lower-Division Courses

PED 101J. Swimming.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Swimming I. For nonswimmers. Elementary physical and mental adjustments, four basic strokes, water safety.
Topic 2: Beginning Swimming II. For well-adjusted but weak swimmers. Five basic strokes, elementary diving, water safety.
Topic 3: Intermediate Swimming. For the average swimmer. Six power strokes, diving, water safety, introduction to conditioning.
Topic 5: Stroke Technique and Fitness Swimming.

PED 102G (TCCN: PHED 1151, PHED 1152). Skin Diving and Scuba Diving.

Training in underwater safety, skin and scuba skills, care of equipment. Culminates in PADI certification. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Advanced-level swimming skills. Strong swimming and survival skills required.

Topic 1: Basic Scuba Diving. Classroom, pool, and open water training with emphasis on underwater safety, the skills of skin and scuba diving, equipment, the underwater environment, planning for a dive. Culminates in nationally recognized certification.
Topic 2: Intermediate Scuba Diving. Open to divers with Basic Certification. Classroom, pool, and open water training with emphasis on navigation, air consumption, emergency procedures, night dives. Culminates in nationally recognized certification.
Topic 3: Advanced Scuba Diving. Open to experienced divers with Intermediate Certification. Classroom, pool, and open water training with emphasis on deep dives, mapping, search and research diving, equipment rescue work. Culminates in nationally recognized certification.

PED 103L. Social Dance.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 1: Beginning Social Dance. Introduction to popular social partner dances, including swing, waltz, two-step, salsa, tango and more. Emphasis on connecting with a dance partner and the art of leading and following. May not be counted by students with credit for Kinesiology 119.
Topic 2: Intermediate Social Dance. An intermediate survey of popular social dances. Includes new dance styles and more advanced partnering skills. Prerequisite: Kinesiology 119 (Topic 16: Social Dance) or Physical Education 103L (Topic 1).
Topic 3: Advanced Social Dance. Designed for the advanced dancer. Includes advanced partnering in familiar and new dance styles, movement analysis and dance critique, role reversal and teaching techniques, and history of social dance. Prerequisite: Physical Education 103L (Topic 2: Intermediate Social Dance), and audition on first class meeting.

PED 104P. Tennis.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Tennis. For the nonplayer.
Topic 2: Advanced Beginning Tennis. For players with weak strokes and serves.
Topic 3: Intermediate Tennis. Prerequisite: A steady stroke and consistent serve.
Topic 4: Advanced Intermediate Tennis. Prerequisite: Skilled all-court play.
Topic 5: Advanced Tennis. Prerequisite: Competence for tournament play.

PED 104R. Racquetball.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Racquetball. For the nonplayer.
Topic 2: Intermediate Racquetball. Prerequisite: Racquetball experience.
Topic 3: Advanced Racquetball. Prerequisite: Competence for tournament play.

PED 105C. Handball.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Handball. For the nonplayer.
Topic 2: Intermediate Handball. Prerequisite: Handball experience.
Topic 3: Advanced Handball. Prerequisite: Competence for tournament play.
Topic 4: Handball Doubles. Prerequisite: Handball experience.

PED 105M. Fencing.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Fencing: Foil.
Topic 2: Beginning Fencing: Epee.
Topic 3: Intermediate Fencing: Foil. Prerequisite: Physical Education 105M (Topic 1).
Topic 4: Intermediate Fencing: Epee. Prerequisite: Physical Education 105M (Topic 2).
Topic 5: Intermediate Fencing: Saber. Prerequisite: Physical Education 105M (Topic 1).
Topic 6: Advanced Fencing: Foil. Prerequisite: Any intermediate-level fencing course.

PED 105R. Karate/Tae Kwon Do.

Includes self-defense. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Karate/Tae Kwon Do. Prerequisite: No experience required.
Topic 2: Intermediate Karate/Tae Kwon Do. Prerequisite: Karate experience.
Topic 3: Advanced Karate/Tae Kwon Do. Prerequisite: Competence for tournament play.

PED 105T. Judo.

Includes self-defense. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Judo. No experience required.
Topic 2: Intermediate Judo. Prerequisite: Judo experience.
Topic 3: Advanced Judo. Prerequisite: Competence for tournament play.

PED 106C. Conditioning.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Swim Conditioning.
Topic 2: Cardiovascular and Weight Training.
Topic 3: Aerobic Walking.
Topic 4: Aerobics.
Topic 5: Body Works.
Topic 6: Circuit Aerobics.
Topic 7: Weight Training.
Topic 8: Running.

PED 107C. Archery.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Archery. Basic form.
Topic 2: Intermediate Archery. Bow mechanics and competition. Prerequisite: Archery experience.
Topic 3: Intermediate Field Archery. Prerequisite: Archery experience.
Topic 4: Advanced Archery. Tournament shooting and psychology of competition. Prerequisite: Intermediate-level archery skills or 225 FITA average.

PED 107D. Golf.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Golf.
Topic 2: Intermediate Golf. Prerequisite: One semester of beginning golf or an eighteen-hole scoring average of eighty to one hundred.

PED 107L. Gymnastics.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Tumbling and Trampoline.
Topic 2: Intermediate Tumbling and Trampoline. Prerequisite: Tumbling and trampoline experience.
Topic 3: Rhythmic Gymnastics. Combination of gymnastics and dance movements performed to music using the hand apparatus of balls, hoops, ribbons, or ropes.
Topic 4: Beginning Gymnastics I. Apparatus work in either men's or women's Olympic gymnastics events.
Topic 5: Beginning Gymnastics II. Apparatus work in either men's or women's Olympic gymnastics events. Prerequisite: Limited gymnastics experience.
Topic 6: Intermediate Gymnastics. Apparatus work in either men's or women's Olympic gymnastics events. Prerequisite: Gymnastics experience.
Topic 7: Intermediate Advanced Gymnastics. Apparatus work in either men's or women's Olympic gymnastics events. Intense activity. Prerequisite: Gymnastics experience.
Topic 8: Advanced Gymnastics. Apparatus work in either men's or women's Olympic gymnastics events. Intense activity. Prerequisite: Intermediate-level gymnastics experience.

PED 108C. Basketball.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Basketball. For those with little or no basketball experience.
Topic 2: Intermediate Basketball. For those with some skills in the game.
Topic 3: Advanced Basketball. For those with high skill and some competitive experience.

PED 108J. Power Volleyball.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Power Volleyball. For those with few or no volleyball skills.
Topic 2: Intermediate Power Volleyball. For those with good basic skills: bump, set, spike, serve.
Topic 3: Advanced Power Volleyball. For those with high skills and knowledge of multiple offenses.

PED 108S. Softball.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Beginning Softball. For those with few softball skills.
Topic 2: Intermediate Softball. For those with experience and good basic skills.


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