Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2016-2017 and 2017-2018; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students should consult the Course Schedule to determine which courses and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The Course Schedule may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in General Information. In brief, the first digit of a course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower-division rank; if 20 through 79, of upper-division rank; if 80 through 99, of graduate rank.

Environmental Science: EVS

Lower-Division Courses

EVS 311. Field Seminar in Sustainability.

Restricted to environmental science majors. Introduces field observation and analysis of environmental processes and sustainability issues. Subjects include ecology, hydrogeology, marine science, climate science, energy, and campus sustainability. Two lecture hours and four laboratory or field laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Upper-Division Courses

EVS 121. Research Methods.

Restricted to students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science. Overview of the methods involved in research projects designed to help prepare students in independent research projects or internships. One lecture hour and one workshop hour a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Environmental Science 311 with a grade of at least C-.

EVS 331. Research Methods for the Environmental Sciences.

Restricted to environmental science majors. Subjects include experimental design, statistical analysis and modeling, and ethics. Students develop and conduct an independent research project during the laboratory portion of the course. Two lecture hours and four laboratory or field laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Environmental Science 311 with a grade of at least C-.

EVS 141. Environmental Science Professionalism I.

Restricted to environmental science majors. Examines the fundamental, nontechnical aspects of environmental science and sustainability practices through the use of case studies and projects that use interdisciplinary approaches. Subjects may include the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in addressing and assessing environmental science processes, the development of professional opportunities across disciplines, understanding professional responsibilities, applying ethical principles, the balance of multidisciplinary demands in professional practice, and the need for lifelong learning. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Environmental Science 311, and 331 with a grade of at least C- in each.

EVS 151. Environmental Science Professionalism II.

Restricted to environmental science majors. Examines the fundamental, nontechnical aspects of environmental science and sustainability practices. Focuses on the use of interdisciplinary communication for addressing and assessing environmental science processes, the challenges posed by communicating across disciplines, the development of professional communication and public speaking skills, effective presentation of research, the ethics and practices of peer research review, and effective communication of the effects of environmental science in a global society. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Environmental Science 141.

EVS 171, 271, 371, 471. Research Experience.

Restricted to environmental science majors. Supervised study of selected topics in environmental science by individual arrangement with the instructor. Conference course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

EVS 172C, 272C, 372C, 472C. Senior Research Proposal in Environmental Science.

Restricted to seniors in the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science degree program. Work towards an understanding of the broader literature on a topic, identify hypothesis of interest, design an experiment to test the hypothesis, develop a budget, and write a research proposal. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged as needed. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Biology 373, 373L, and Environmental Science 121, with a grade of at least C- in each.

EVS 172D, 272D, 372D, 472D. Senior Research in Environmental Science.

Restricted to seniors pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science degree. Continuation of Environmental Science 172C, 272C, 373C, or 472C. Perform proposed experiment, collect and analyze data, present results, and write a final report. For each semester hour of credit earned, one hour of field work and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Environmental Science 172C, 272C, 372C, or 472C with a grade of at least C- and consent of instructor.

Geological Sciences: GEO

Lower-Division Courses

GEO 401 (TCCN: GEOL 1403). Physical Geology.

Registration priority given to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Nature, properties, and distribution of crustal materials; surficial processes; internal processes; origin of continents, oceans, and ocean basins; mineral and fuel resources. Three lecture hours and two hours of laboratory or fieldwork a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 401, 303, 420H.

GEO 302C. Climate: Past, Present, and Future.

Designed for non-geological sciences majors. Principal factors that determine Earth's climate, evidence of climate change, causes of climate change, natural climatic variations and human-induced changes, prediction of climate in the next one hundred years, and uncertainties in climate prediction. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester.

GEO 302D. Age of Dinosaurs.

An exploration of the general principles of natural history, focusing on the natural history of dinosaurs. An introduction to the basics of geology, anatomy, paleontology, and evolutionary theory, followed by the application of this knowledge, in tracing the evolutionary history of Dinosauria. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May not be counted toward a degree in environmental or geological sciences.

GEO 302E. Earth, Wind, and Fire.

Designed for non-geological sciences majors. Geologic phenomena that affect everyday life, including global warming, earthquakes, volcanism, desertification, river and coastline flooding and erosion, groundwater, mineral resources, and plate tectonics. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May not be counted toward a degree in environmental science or geological sciences.

GEO 302K (TCCN: GEOL 1301, GEOL 1302). Selected Topics in Geological Sciences.

Designed for nonscience majors. The impact of geological processes on human activity; geologic topics of popular interest. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in environmental or geological sciences. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

GEO 302M. The Age of Mammals.

Introductory-level course on paleontology and natural history for nonscience majors. Basic geological processes, fossilization, and the fossil record. Overview of the "tree of life." Summary of the evolution and diversification of mammals, an introduction to interactions between physical and biological processes, and the impact of climate change and human activities on mammalian communities. Laboratory component focuses on the mammalian skeleton and common Texas mammals. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. May not be counted toward a degree in environmental or geological sciences.

GEO 302P. Sustaining a Planet.

Restricted to freshmen and sophomores. Examines sustainability and the environment from the perspective of multiple disciplines. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences.

GEO 303. Introduction to Geology.

Registration priority given to environmental science, geological sciences, and petroleum and geosystems engineering majors. Mineral and rock composition of the earth; measurement of geologic time; origin and evolution of life; earth's interior; plate tectonics; depositional environments and processes; ancient climates; humans, earth resources, and the environment. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 401, 303, 420H.

GEO 303C. Introduction to the Solar System.

Examines the origin and evolution of our solar system; how processes such as volcanism and impacts have shaped planet surfaces, as well as the workings of planetary interiors; the unique properties of Earth that allowed life to arise and evolve; the prospects for seeking life on other planets in our own solar system and beyond; and the history of planetary exploration and the methods scientists use to explore fundamental questions regarding our place in the universe. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 303C and 310C (Topic: Introduction to the Solar System) may not both be counted. May not be counted towards a degree in environmental science, geological sciences, or geosystems engineering and hydrogeology.

GEO 405 (TCCN: GEOL 1404). Life through Time.

Restricted to freshmen and sophomores, with registration priority given to majors in the geological and environmental science degree plans. The history and development of life, and the processes of change from the early Precambrian era to the present. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 404C and 405 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 420H with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 305E. Energy and the Environment.

A survey of all forms of current and potential sources of energy, and how these might impact the earth's environment. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in environmental science, geological sciences, or geosystems engineering and hydrogeology.

GEO 306P. Geology and Sustainability.

Restricted to environmental science entry-level majors. Examines sustainability and environmental science from an interdisiplinary perspective. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester. Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor.

GEO 110C, 210C, 310C. Conference Course.

Supervised study of selected topics in geological sciences, by individual arrangement with the instructor. Conference course. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 211. Emerging Scholars in Geological Sciences.

Introduction to research areas in the geological sciences, with emphasis on the skills needed for success in graduate school and the professional workplace. Four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 012N. JSG Geosciences Mentors Program - First-year.

Restricted to first-year students in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Introduction to the various geosciences disciplines and corresponding degree programs and research areas. Emphasis on the skills needed for success in graduate school and the professional workplace, such as interactive sessions with the Jackson School of Geosciences Career Center to address internships, career planning, and job search skills. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences or environmental sciences. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 114G. Geophysics Colloquium.

Open to non-geological sciences majors, but registration priority is given to geological sciences majors. Exploration of a variety of problems in modern geophysics. Two lecture hours a week for one semester, and at least one weekend field trip. Geological Sciences 110C (Topic: Geophysics Colloquium) and 114G may not both be counted. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 416K. Earth Materials.

Restricted to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences; others may register with consent of instructor. Introduction to minerals, mineral study techniques, igneous and metamorphic rocks and ore deposits, and formation processes. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Chemistry 301; and Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 420H.

GEO 416M. Sedimentary Rocks.

Restricted to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Description and interpretation of sedimentary rocks in hand specimen and thin section; characteristics of sedimentary rocks deposited in different environments. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester, with two additional one-day field trips to be arranged. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 420H with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 316P. Sedimentary Rocks.

Registration priority given to petroleum and geosystems engineering majors and Energy and Management Certificate Program students. Examines the fundamentals of sedimentary rocks, including siliciclastic grain parameters and mineralogy, sediment transport and sedimentary structures; and carbonate mineralogy and geochemistry, grain and matrix constituents, modern facies, and classification. Reviews the principal siliciclastic and carbonate depositional systems, their process of formation and facies architecture and the role of process and architecture in petrophysical patterns, distribution of permeability and porosity, flow units, reservoir heterogeneities, and hydrocarbon recovery. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester. May not be counted toward any degree in environmental science or geological sciences. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 420H with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Geological Sciences.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Geological Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

GEO 420F. Classic Geology in Scotland.

Introduction to the founding concepts of geology. Students use advanced field technologies while studying the geology of Scotland on all scales of size. The equivalent of four lecture hours a week for one semester, including field exercises in a variety of geological settings. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 303, 401 or 420H with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 420H. Honors Introductory Geology.

Restricted to geological sciences and geosystems engineering and hydrogeology majors. An accelerated introductory course on the composition, structure, and history of the earth. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester, and several all-day field trips. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 401, 303, 420H. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 420K. Introduction to Field and Stratigraphic Methods.

Restricted to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Field observation of geological processes and study of the mineralogy, petrology, stratigraphy, paleontology, and structural geology of central Texas. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester, and six weekend field trips. Geological Sciences 420K and 320L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416K and 416M with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 320L. Introductory Field Geology.

Designed for non-geological sciences majors. Study of geologic features and processes in the field; emphasizes regional geology of central Texas and techniques of geologic mapping. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered between the spring semester and the summer session only. Geological Sciences 420K and 320L may not both be counted. May not be counted toward a degree in environmental science, geological sciences, or geosystems engineering and hydrogeology. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: One of the following: Geological Sciences 401, 303, 420H, or consent of instructor.

GEO 322J. Transitions in the History of Life.

Registration priority given to geological sciences majors. Explores transitions in the history of life, including mass extinctions, climatic perturbations, environmental changes, and their impact on the Earth's biota. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester in alternate years. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Geological Sciences 405 with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 422K. Paleobiology.

Registration priority given to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Systematics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, and evolution of fossil organisms. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester, with two additional one-day field trips. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Biology 311D, Geological Sciences 404C or 405, and 416M with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 322S. Development and Evolution of the Vertebrate Skeleton.

Registration priority given to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Introduction to the organization and development of the vertebrate skeleton; survey of vertebrate history. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 022T. JSG Geosciences Mentors Program - Transfer.

Restricted to first semester transfer students in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Introduction to the various geosciences disciplines and corresponding degree programs and research areas. Emphasis on the skills needed for success in graduate school and the professional workplace, such as interactive sessions with the Jackson School of Geosciences Career Center to address internships, career planning, and job search skills. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in geological sciences or environmental sciences. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 322V. Morphology of the Vertebrate Skeleton.

Identification of skeletal elements from the major vertebrate taxa, and aspects of skeletal functional morphology, with emphasis on extant taxa. Subjects include the skeletal systems of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only, in alternate years. Geological Sciences 322V and 389R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 311C, Geological Sciences 404C or 405 with a grade of at least C-, and consent of instructor.

GEO 325G. Computational Applications in the Geosciences.

Restricted to environmental science and geological sciences majors. An introduction to programming in MATLAB and applications to simulation of physical processes and data analysis in the geosciences. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 325J and 325G may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 303 or 401, Mathematics 408D or 408M, and Physics 301 or 303K.

GEO 325J. Programming in FORTRAN and MATLAB.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. FORTRAN for students without knowledge of a computer programming language: survey of all variable types, loops, arrays, subroutines, and functions; overview of UNIX and MATLAB. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 325J and 325G may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427J or 427K with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 325K. Computational Methods.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Sampling and aliasing. Review of sinusoids and wave terminology, complex numbers and complex sinusoids, vectors and matrices, the discrete Fourier transform, convolution, the convolution theorem, linear digital filters and transfer functions, random variable concepts and statistics, and least squares estimation. MATLAB is used for homework problems and examples. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C- in each: Geological Sciences 325J, Mathematics 427J or 427K, Physics 301 and 316 or 303K and 303L.

GEO 426P. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Mineralogy, geochemistry, and processes of magmatism and metamorphism. Three lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416K with a grade of at least C-; and registration or a grade of at least C- in either Physics 301 and 101L, or 303K and 103M.

GEO 327G. Geographic Information System and Global Positioning System Applications in Earth Sciences.

Restricted to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Theory and practice of geographic information system (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies, and their applications to problems in earth sciences. Laboratories and field trips provide hands-on experience with the collection, mapping, and analysis of geologic and other field data using GPS equipment and GIS software. Topics include map projections; datums and reference frames; cartographic principles; remotely sensed data (satellite and aerial photos, image radar); vector- and raster-based image formats; geospatial data resources; GIS software applications; surveying principles; GPS constellation and data structure; differential GPS; data logging schemes; GPS postprocessing software; integration of GPS and GIS in mapmaking; extant GIS applications in geology and hydrogeology. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester, and two weekend field trips. Geological Sciences 327G and 371C (Topic: Geographic Information System and Global Positioning System Applications in Earth Sciences) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 420K with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 428. Structural Geology.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Description, classification, and origin of Earth structures. Solution of problems by descriptive geometry, geologic maps, and contouring. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Geological Sciences 420K; Mathematics 408C or 408L; and Physics 301 and 101L, or 303K and 103M.

GEO 129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Geological Sciences.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Geological Sciences. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

GEO 329W. Hydrogeology Cooperative (Geological Sciences).

Restricted to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Covers the work period of geological sciences students in the Cooperative Education program, which provides supervised work experience by arrangement with the employer and the supervising instructor. The student must submit a final report to the supervising instructor at the conclusion of the program. Forty laboratory hours a week for one semester. The student must repeat the course each work period and must take it twice to receive credit toward the degree; at least one of these registrations must be during a long-session semester. No more than three semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement; no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the degree. The student's first registration must be on the pass/fail basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application to become a member of the Hydrogeology Cooperative (Geological Sciences) Program, and consent of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the geological sciences undergraduate faculty adviser.

GEO 330K. Energy Exploration.

Registration priority given to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Covers the fundamental elements of the petroleum system, including the origin of source rocks and reservoirs, rock properties, migration of hydrocarbons, and correlation methods for rock formations. During the final weeks of the course, students form exploration teams and work up real subsurface data from the Gulf of Mexico in order to participate in a simulated lease sale. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C- in each: Geological Sciences 416M; and Physics 303L and 103N, or Physics 316 and 116L.

GEO 331K. Petrology and Plate Tectonics.

Registration priority given to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Sedimentation, metamorphism, igneous activity, and deformation patterns at rift zones, subduction zones, and transform margins. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly, as shown in the Course Schedule. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 428 with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 335. Geology and Mineral Resources of Texas.

Geologic history of the region; local rocks, fossils, and mineral resources; influence of physiography, surface and subsurface water supplies, and energy and mineral resource production on the state economy. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester; local field trips may also be required. Normally offered in the fall semester only. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences: Option I (General Geology), Option II (Geophysics), Option III (Hydrogeology), or Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Geological Sciences 401, 303, or 420H; and 404C or 405.

GEO 338J. Marine Geology.

Restricted to students with a major in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Priority given to geological sciences majors. A survey of the field of marine geology by exploring the structure and evolution of the ocean basins, oceanic islands, and island arcs, the chemistry of the oceans, the sediments in the marine environments, the products and processes of the land-air-sea interface, and the history of the oceans over geologic time. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered in the fall semester only. Offered in alternate years. Geological Sciences 338J and 371C (Topic: Marine Geology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GEO 338T. Marine Tectonics.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Tectonic processes within the dynamic Earth, with a focus on oceanic structures. Subjects may include fundamentals of plate tectonics; plate motion, driving forces, and mantle convection; evolution of triple junction and plate margins; plate reconstructions; earthquakes and focal mechanisms; structure and geochemistry of the Earth's interior; mantle structure and tomography; rheology and deformation mechanisms in mantle and crust; heat flow, gravity, the geoid, and paleomagnetism; hotspots and mantle plumes; seafloor spreading and oceanic spreading ridges; oceanic transform faults and fracture zones; and subduction zones, volcanic island arcs, and marginal seas. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 338T, 371C (Topic: Tectonics I), 381T, 391 (Topic: Tectonics I). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 428 with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 339T. Continental Tectonics.

Registration priority given to geological sciences majors. Tectonic processes, with a focus on continental lithospheric structures. Subjects may include convergent margins, subduction zones, magmatic arcs, and foreland structures; collisional orogenesis, arc-continent collisions, continent-continent collision, and mountain building; formation of supercontinents; uplift and exhumation; orogenic collapse and extensional tectonics; continental rifting and passive margins; transform margins; and the effect of tectonics on climate and oceanic circulation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 339T, 371C (Topic: Tectonics II), 382T, 391 (Topic: Tectonics II). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: For geological sciences majors, Geological Sciences 428 with a grade of at least C-; for others, consent of instructor.

GEO 340T. Geoclimatology.

Restricted to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Examination of the climate records encoded in sedimentary archives through geologic time. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 340T and 371C (Topic: Geoclimatology) may not both be counted. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302, Geological Sciences 416K, and 416M with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 341. Mineral Resources, Society, and the Environment.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Nature and origin of mineral resources; their discovery, extraction, and uses; and their relationship to global history, economics, and the environment. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 416K with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 341F. Microstructures and Rock Rheology.

Focuses on processes of deformation operative in the crust and upper mantle, with an emphasis on distinguishing these processes using microstructural analysis and describing them using basic constitutive relationships from rock mechanics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 428 with a grade of B or higher.

GEO 341G. Geomicrobiology.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Geologic and hydrologic controls on subsurface microbial growth, metabolism, and community structure; the geochemical consequences of microbial processes in subsurface settings; and the influence of geology on microbial ecology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only, in alternate years. Geological Sciences 341G and 381G may not both be counted. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: For geological sciences majors, upper-division standing; for others, upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

GEO 343Q. Fundamentals and Applications of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

Restricted to students with a major in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Explores fundamentals of the technique and, through hands-on labs, applications and capabilities of Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Requires a working knowledge of MS Excel, including manipulation of rows and columns of data, application of basic algebraic functions to derive statistics, sorting and filtering of data. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 343Q and 371C (Topic: Fundamentals and Applications of ICP-MS) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GEO 344K. Marine Mining and Minerals.

Same as Marine Sciences 344K. Overview of seafloor mineral deposits, their exploration, and mining. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences or the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Sciences degrees. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 401 or 303, 416K, and 416M.

GEO 344U. Quantitative Seismic Interpretation.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Seismic inversion, a tool for reservoir characterization, post- and pre-stack modeling, rock physics and fluid replacement modeling, wavelet estimation and post-stack inversion, AVO and pre-stack inversion, multiattribute regression and neural network, and net pay estimation. Extensive hands-on training with three-dimensional seismic and well-log data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only, in alternate years. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GEO 145E. Professional Ethics in Geosciences.

Registration priority is given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Supervised study devoted to the subject of professional ethics and personal integrity in the sciences, with specific subject matter designed to evolve with the science and our society. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 145E and 171C (Topic: Professional Ethics in Geosciences) may not both be counted. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences or environmental sciences course. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: For non-Jackson School of Geosciences majors, consent of instructor.

GEO 346C. Introduction to Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology.

Registration priority given to environmental science and geological sciences majors. Basic concepts of fluid flow, surface and subsurface hydrology, aqueous geochemistry, and fluid-rock interaction. Additional subjects include isotope hydrogeology, evolution of seawater, and mineral-solution equilibrium. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302 with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 347D. Global Warming.

Discussion of the fundamental sciences of global warming, including an active investigation of contemporary climate change issues. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 347D and 371C (Topic: Global Warming) may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GEO 347G. Climate System Modeling.

Studies the basic theory of climate system modeling using state-of-the-art regional climate models in a variety of applications. Subjects may include paleoclimate study and future climate prediction based on greenhouse gas increases. Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of UNIX and programming experience in FORTRAN. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following maybe counted: Geological Sciences 347G, 371C (Topic: Climate System Modeling), 387G, 391 (Topic: Climate System Modeling). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GEO 347K. Gems and Gem Minerals.

Crystallography, occurrence, and identification of gem minerals and materials; artificial gems; simple cutting and polishing; history of gems and gemology. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. May not be counted toward a degree in environmental science or geological sciences. Prerequisite: One of the following with a grade of at least C-: Geological Sciences 303, 401, or 420H.

GEO 347P. Climate System Physics.

Discussion of first-order principles and processes that govern the thermodynamical structure and energy distribution of the atmosphere, ocean, land, and cryosphere and their interaction with the dynamic aspect of the climate system. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 347P, 371C (Topic: Climate System Physics), 387P, 391 (Topic: Climate System Physics). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Mathematics 408D or 408M, and Physics 303K with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 348K. Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course.

Hands-on, team-based instruction in the collection and processing of marine geological and geophysical data along the Gulf of Mexico coast. For Marine Sciences 148, one lecture hour and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. For Geological Sciences 348K and Marine Sciences 348, one lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester with additional hours to be arranged. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 348K, 397F, Marine Sciences 348 (Topic 2). Fulfills the field experience requirement for some geological sciences degree programs. Students should contact the Department of Geological Sciences before registering. Prerequisite: For geological sciences majors, Geological Sciences 420K or 320L with a grade of at least C-, and consent of instructor; Geological Sciences 416M and 465K are recommended; for others, Marine Sciences 307 and 354F with a grade of at least C- in each, and consent of instructor.

GEO 348P. Field Methods in Planetary Geology.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Field studies combined with remote sensing to support studies of remote imagery from planetary missions. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Three week field trip to the Southwestern United States also required; offered in summer session only. Geological Sciences 348P and 371C (Topic: Field Methods Planetary Geology) may not both be counted.

GEO 349C. Introduction to the Cryosphere.

Restricted to students with a major in the Jackson School of Geosciences. A survey of the crysopheric sciences. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 349C and 371T (Topic: Introduction to the Cryosphere) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and the following with a grade of at least C- in each: Chemistry 204; Geological Sciences 401 or 303; Mathematics 408D or 408M; and Physics 303L and 103N, or 316 and 116L.

GEO 350D. Ice Dynamics.

Physics of ice motion, basal processes, glacial hydrology, and unstable flow. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Offered in alternate years. Geological Sciences 350D and 371C (Topic: Glaciology) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and the following with a grade of at least C-: Chemistry 204; Geological Sciences 401 or 303, and 349C; Mathematics 408D or 408M; and Physics 303L and 103N, or 316 and 116L.

GEO 354. Physics of Earth.

Registration priority given to geophysics majors. Examines the kinematics and dynamics of the solid Earth as well as its evolution through time. Observations from multiple geophysical techniques are reviewed and applied towards understanding the planet. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Geological Sciences 354 and 384D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Geological Sciences 465K, Mathematics 427J or 427K, and Physics 315 and 115L.

GEO 358K. Volcanology.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Ash deposits, lava flows, eruption processes; prediction and mitigation of volcanic hazards. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 426P with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 660. Field Geology.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Methods of geologic mapping with topographic maps and aerial photographs. Field studies include measuring sections, interpretation of stratigraphy, structure, environments of deposition of various sedimentary rocks, and the origin and petrology of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Students must register for this course during the first summer registration period. Given for six weeks each summer in Colorado, New Mexico, and other western states. Normally offered in the summer session only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 420K and 428 with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 360G. Construction and Interpretations of 3-D Stratigraphy.

Restricted to students with a major in the Jackson School of Geosciences. From Earth surface to subsurface, examines three-dimensional volumes of basin-filling stratigraphy to explore how depositional landscapes are preserved in the sedimentary record and how sedimentary deposits can be analyzed to produce quantitative reconstructions of past environmental states. Data includes both laboratory and industry-grade volumes of stratigraphy. Intended for Earth scientists requiring a quantitative understanding of how the structure of depositional landscapes is translated into subsurface stratigraphy. The equivalent of three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 360G and 371C (Topic: Construction and Interpretation of 3-D Stratigraphy) may not both be counted. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences or environmental sciences course. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

GEO 661. Geophysics Field Camp.

Restricted to geophysics majors. Field studies for geophysics majors, including seismic, magnetic, electrical, gravity, and other techniques; related data processing and interpretation. Each half requires three consecutive weeks of fieldwork. Geological Sciences 661A is offered either between the spring semester and the summer session or in the summer session; Geological Sciences 661B is offered in the summer session. Students may take Geological Sciences 661 for University credit while enrolled in the Los Alamos National Laboratory SAGE program. May be used in place of Geological Sciences 660 to fulfill the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option II: Geophysics). Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 420K, 465K, and 365P with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 465K. Seismic Exploration.

Registration priority given to geophysics majors. Seismic theory, including body and surface waves, attenuation, rays, reflection and transmission coefficients, principles of synthetic seismogram calculations, seismic imaging principles, reflection data processing methods, rock physics overview, seismic attributes overview, and seismic exploration field methods. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427L, Physics 315, and 115L with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 365N. Seismic Data Processing.

Restricted to students with a major in the Jackson School of Geosciences; registration priority given to geophysics majors. Reduction of seismic reflection data from field records to final geologic images. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Geological Sciences 325K and 465K with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 365P. Potential Field Applications in Geophysics.

Registration priority given to geophysics majors. Introduction to the theory, measurement, and application of gravity and magnetic and electric fields to exploration and global-scale problems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Mathematics 427J or 427K, 427L, and Physics 315 and 115L.

GEO 365Q. Geomorphology Process and Form.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Explores how Earth surface processes combine to shape landscapes through erosion and deposition. Includes discussion of open channel flow, sediment transport, fluvial and hillslope processes, and tectonic controls on landscape evolution. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with several field trips to be arranged. Normally offered in the fall semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 365Q, 371C (Topic: Geomorphology: Landscape Process, Form, and Evolution), 385Q, 391 (Topic: Geomorphology: Landscape Process, Form, and Evolution). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Mathematics 408C or 408L with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 366M. Mathematical Methods in Geophysics.

Registration priority given to geophysics majors. A survey of mathematics for geoscientists that includes infinite series, complex variables, linear algebra, integral transforms, ordinary and partial differential equations, tensor analysis, and probability and statistics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester. Geological Sciences 366M and 380J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Mathematics 427L with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 468K. Geophysics for Geological Sciences Majors.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. A survey of seismic, magnetic, gravitational, and other geophysical tools and their application to exploration and global-scale problems. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. May not be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences, Option II: Geophysics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D; and Physics 303L and 103N, or 316 and 116L with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 370K. Sedimentology.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Processes of sediment formation, transportation, and deposition; textures, structures, and facies of sedimentary rocks. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, and two one-day field trips. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 420K with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 171C, 271C, 371C. Conference Course.

Restricted to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Supervised study of selected topics in geological sciences, by individual arrangement with the department and instructor. Conference course. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 171H. Honors Research Methods I.

Restricted to students in the Geological Sciences Honors Program. Preparation for independent research projects through exposure to current research programs, facilities, personnel, and projects in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Includes selecting research topics, mentors, and supervisors; preparing research proposals; conducting research activities; and presenting research results. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

GEO 371S. Geological Sciences Research Methods.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Supervised research project completed in collaboration with faculty supervisor and related research group members either as a one-semester research activity in preparation for a senior thesis project. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Geological Sciences 416K, 416M, and 420K with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 171T, 271T, 371T, 471T, 571T, 671T. Undergraduate Seminar in Geological Sciences.

Registration priority is given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester; additional hours may be required for some topics. May not be substituted for any required geological sciences courses. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Upper-division standing and consent of instructor; additional prerequisites may vary with the topic.

GEO 172H. Honors Research Methods II.

Restricted to students in the Geological Sciences Honors Program. Preparation for independent research projects through exposure to current research programs, facilities, personnel, and projects in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Includes selecting research topics, mentors, and supervisors; preparing research proposals; conducting research activities; and presenting research results. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 171H with a grade of at least B-.

GEO 173H. Honors Research Methods III.

Restricted to students in the Geological Sciences Honors Program. Preparation for independent research projects through exposure to current research programs, facilities, personnel, and projects in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Includes selecting research topics, mentors, and supervisors; preparing research proposals; conducting research activities; and presenting research results. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 171H and 172H with a grade of at least B- in each.

GEO 376C. Isotope Geology.

Overview of the principles of stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry. Subjects include mass spectrometry, geochronology and thermochronology, cosmogenic nuclides, radiogenic geochemistry, isotopic fractionation, traditional and non-traditional stable isotope geochemistry and its applications to the hydrologic cycle, low-temperature geochemistry, magmatic and metamorphic processes, thermometry, fluid-rock interactions, tectonics, crust-mantle evolution, and extraterrestrial materials. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 371C (Topic: Isotope and Environmental Geology Research), 376C, 388L. Prerequisite: Chemistry 302, and Mathematics 408D or 408M with a grade of at least C- in each, and consent of instructor.

GEO 376E. Environmental Isotope Geochemistry.

Restricted to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. The application of the isotope and trace element geochemistry of natural waters and sediments to studies of the hydrologic cycle. Stable, radiogenic, and cosmogenic isotopes are used as tracers of the evolution of groundwater, surface water, and ocean water. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional laboratory hours to be arranged. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Chemistry 302, 204, Geological Sciences 416K, 416M, 346C, Mathematics 408D or 408M, and Physics 303L and 103N.

GEO 476K. Groundwater Hydrology.

Registration priority given to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Introduction to subsurface hydrology, emphasizing geological controls on groundwater flow; quantitative methods of analyzing aquifer systems; regional hydrology; water quality and pollution. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester, with several local field trips. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 346C, Mathematics 408D, or 408M with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 376L. Field Methods in Groundwater Hydrology.

Registration priority given to hydrogeology majors. Introduction to field methods, including geophysics, pump tests, stream gauging, well-logging, water sampling, and mapping. Students must register for this course during the first summer registration period. An intensive three-week course meeting eight hours a day, Monday through Friday, and four hours on Saturday: lectures, laboratory exercises, and field exercises; nightly homework involving map exercises, reduction of field data, report preparation; Saturdays devoted to report presentation, review sessions, and local field trips. Offered between the spring semester and the summer session. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 476K with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 476M. Aqueous Geochemistry.

Registration priority given to environmental science and geological sciences option III majors (hydrogeology). An introduction to aqueous geochemistry and contaminant hydrogeochemistry; topics include basic thermodynamics, kinetics, rock-water interactions, and solute transport. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 346C, 476K, or 376S with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 376S. Physical Hydrology.

Registration priority given to environmental science and hydrogeology majors. Modern conceptual and methodological approaches to hydrological science: qualitative assessment of hydrological processes, quantitative representation, approaches to measurement, and treatment of uncertainty. Major components of the hydrological cycle: precipitation, snow and snowmelt, infiltration, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and runoff and their link to the coupled-earth system. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 346C, or Mathematics 408D or 408M with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 376T. High-Temperature Geochemistry.

Restricted to majors in the Jackson School of Geosciences. Study of the composition, origin, and chemical and physical evolution of the earth and its interior. Examines the links between the fields of geochemistry and tectonics, igneous petrology, geophysics, and other areas of inquiry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Mathematics 408D or 408M with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 476W. Hydrogeophysics.

Application of geophysical methods in hydrogeology. Modules include method theory and hydrogeological applications; using instruments in the field; and analysis of data, interpretation, and hydrogeological insights. Class discussions; field exercises and written field exercise summaries; individual and group reports. Previous coursework and/or experience in hydrogeology and geophysics is recommended. The equivalent of four lecture hours a week for one semester, with field work hours to be arranged. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 371C (Topic: Hydrogeophysics), 476W, 382W, 391 (Topic: Hydrogeophysics). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 377K. Applied Karst Hydrogeology.

Registration priority given to hydrogeology majors. The study of karst landforms, processes, flow systems, and water resources. Geologic controls, natural resources, aquifer recharge and discharge, system evolution, geochemistry/water quality, tracing methodologies, geophysical methods, and modeling are covered with an emphasis on collecting and interpreting field data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional fieldwork hours to be arranged. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Course fulfills three hours of field course requirement for Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option III: Hydrogeology) degree program. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 371C (Topic: Applied Karst Hydrogeology), 377K, 391 (Topic: Applied Karst Hydrogeology), 391K. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 476K with a grade of at least C-.

GEO 377P. Physical Climatology.

Investigates the nature of earth's climate and examines the physical processes that maintain the climate system. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Computer Science 303E, Geography 301K, Mathematics 408D or 408M, and Physics 303K with a grade of at least C- in each.

GEO 679G. Special Studies in Geophysics.

Restricted to geophysics majors. Special research projects, field studies, or geophysical/industrial internship. Assigned reading with written and oral report. Three lecture hours a week for two semesters. May be used instead of Geological Sciences 660 in fulfilling the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option II: Geophysics). Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 379H. Honors Thesis in Geological Sciences.

Restricted to students in the Geological Sciences Honors Program. Supervised research project resulting in an honors thesis with an oral defense. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be counted as three of the six geological sciences senior elective hours. Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 171H, 172H, and 173H with a grade of at least B- in each.

GEO 679J. Internship in Hydrogeology.

Restricted to hydrogeology majors. Special hydrogeological studies under the joint supervision of industry professionals and faculty members. Students present a written report. Forty hours a week for one semester. May be used in place of Geological Sciences 660 in fulfilling the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences (Option III: Hydrogeology). Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 476K with a grade of at least C-, and consent of instructor.

GEO 279K, 379K. Special Studies in Advanced Geological Sciences.

Special emphasis on recent developments in geosciences. Conference course. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GEO 479M. Mammalogy.

Surveys the biology and evolutionary history of mammals. Introduction to the diversity of living mammals through the study of mammalian ecology, behavior, morphology, and taxonomy. Laboratory work focuses on the characters diagnosing the major mammalian clades and identifying the common recent mammals of Texas using skins and recent osteological specimens. Fossils and the fossil record of mammals. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in biology, geological sciences, or anthropology.

GEO 379S. Geological Sciences Senior Thesis.

Restricted to geological sciences majors. Second course in a two-course sequence focused on supervised student research and preparation of a final report on research activities. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Geological Sciences 371S with a grade of at least C-.