Department of Anthropology

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Anthropology: ANT

Lower-Division Courses

ANT 301 (TCCN: ANTH 2301). Biological (Physical) Anthropology.

Introduction to the principles and the methods of biological (physical) anthropology. Overview of the study of human beings in an evolutionary context, our relationship to other primates, and to the rest of the natural world. Examines anatomical, behavioral, and genetic similarities and differences among living primates and basic mechanisms of the evolutionary process. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester.

ANT 302 (TCCN: ANTH 2351). Cultural Anthropology.

The concept of culture; social and political organization; language; the supernatural; elementary cultural theory. Three lecture hours a week or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

ANT 304 (TCCN: ANTH 2302). Introduction to Archaeological Studies: Prehistoric Archaeology.

Anthropological study of prehistory, from human beginnings to the appearance of written records. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Anthropology 304 and Archaeology 301 may not both be counted.

ANT 304T. Introduction to Texas Archaeology.

Introduces students to Texas archaeology through lectures, interactive virtual labs, and hands-on laboratory sections that emphasize experimentation. The equivalent of three lecture hours or two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester.

ANT 305. Expressive Culture.

How cultural assumptions affect how we tell and respond to different kinds of stories, including fairy tales, movies, and televised news. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

ANT 307. Culture and Communication.

Same as Linguistics 312C. An introduction to the study of culture through communication and the theory of signs. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 307, Linguistics 312 (Topic: Culture and Communication), 312C.

ANT 310C. Primate Cognition.

Introduction to non-human primate knowledge of the physical world, as well as primate social knowledge. Examines non- human primate cognition within an evolutionary and comparative framework, with emphasis placed on comparing and contrasting non-human primate cognition with that of humans and other taxonomic groups. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Anthropology 310C and 310L (Topic: Primate Cognition) may not both be counted.

ANT 310D. Introduction to Black Studies.

Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 303. Introduction to canonical black studies literature, themes, and theories. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 303, Anthropology 310D, 310L (Topic: Intro to African and African Diaspora Studies).

ANT 310L. Introductory Topics in Anthropology.

Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 2: Anthropology of Race and Ethnicity: An Introduction. Same as American Studies 315D and African and African Diaspora Studies 317D (Topic 2: Anthropology of Race and Ethnicity: An Introduction). Examines the social importance of race and ethnicity both in America and around the world. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 317D (Topic 2) and American Studies 315 (Topic: Anthropology of Race and Ethnicity), 315D, Anthropology 310L (Topic 2).
Topic 3: Anthropology of Latin America. Same as Latin American Studies 315 (Topic 1). Provides a framework for understanding contemporary concerns in Latin America. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 310L (Topic 3), Latin American Studies 310 (Topic 4), 315 (Topic 1).
Topic 4: Introduction to Historical Archaeology. Same as American Studies 315E. A comprehensive survey of the methods, theories, and discoveries of historical archaeology, an interdisciplinary field that draws its theoretical and methodological foundations from anthropology, archaeology, and history. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 315 (Topic: Introduction to Historical Archaeology), 315E, Anthropology 310L (Topic 4).
Topic 5: Introduction to South Asia. Same as Asian Studies 302K. Introduction to Indian and south Asian civilization, past and present, including religion, literature, arts, philosophy, and history. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 310L (Topic 5), Asian Studies 302K, History 306N (Topic: Introduction to India).
Topic 6: Black Queer Diaspora Aesthetics. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 317E (Topic 1) and Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 17). Exploration of over two decades of work produced by and about black queer subjects throughout the circum-Atlantic world. Provides an introduction to various artists and intellectuals of the black queer diaspora, as well as an examination of the viability of black queer aesthetic practice as a form of theorizing. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 317E (Topic: Black Queer Diaspora Aesthetics), 317E (Topic 1), Anthropology 310L (Topic: Black Queer Diaspora Aesthetics), 310L (Topic 6), Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic: Black Queer Diaspora Aesthetics), 301 (Topic 17).
Topic 7: Diaspora: Race, Nation, and Resistance. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 317E (Topic 2). Subjects include makings and meanings of diaspora, the differences and similarities between diaspora and related concepts such as race, nation, and cultural identity. Focuses on the making of the black Atlantic world, and comparative analysis between black diasporic life and that of other global dispersals, particularly among Asian and indigenous populations, and how resistance serves as a key link. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 317E (Topic: Diaspora: Race/Nation/Resistance), 317E (Topic 2), Anthropology 310L (Topic: Diaspora: Race/Nation/Resistance), 310L (Topic 7), Asian American Studies 310 (Topic: Diaspora: Race/Nation/Resistance).
Topic 9: Aztecs and Spaniards. Focus on how imperial expansion affected the daily life of people in the Aztec empire after the Spanish conquest. Examines the daily life of different people in the Aztec empire and the themes of human sacrifice, conquest, warfare, and religion. Explores social and cultural heterogeneity in both of these empires, in order to familiarize students with the diverse lines of evidence available to study these empires, and to understand processes of historical change among the Aztecs and the Spanish empire. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 310L (Topic: Aztecs and Spaniards), 310L (Topic 9), Latin American Studies 315 (Topic: Aztecs and Spaniards).

ANT 314C. Introduction to Mesoamerican Archaeology.

Same as Latin American Studies 315 (Topic 2). Introduction to ancient Mesoamerica from the time of emerging social inequality in the formative period until the Spanish conquest of Mexico-Tenochtitlan in the sixteenth century. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 310L (Topic 1: Introduction to Mesoamerican Archaeology), 314C, Latin American Studies 310 (Topic 3: Introduction to Mesoamerican Archaeology), 315 (Topic 2).

ANT 318L. Mexican American Culture.

Same as Mexican American Studies 318. Mexican American cultural distinctiveness in the areas of social organization, child rearing, food culture, folklore, language, and religion. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

ANT 119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Anthropology.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Anthropology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

ANT 320L. Topics in Language, Culture, and Communication.

Relationship of language to culture and society, and of folk classifications to principles of social organization and cognition. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 3: Ethnography of Communication. History and overview of the ethnography of communication with a focus on theoretical and methodological issues. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302.
Topic 4: American Indian Languages and Cultures. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302.
Topic 5: Speech Play and Verbal Art. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302.
Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives. Same as German 369 (Topic 4) and Linguistics 373 (Topic 9). Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 320L (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), 320L (Topic 9), Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), 348 (Topic 9: The German Language: Historical Perspectives), German 369 (Topic 4), Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 9: German and English: Historical Perspectives), Linguistics 373 (Topic 8: German and English: Historical Perspectives), 373 (Topic 9). Additional prerequisite: Three semester hours of upper-division coursework in German or Linguistics.
Topic 10: Language, Culture, and Society in Latin America. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302, 305, 307, or Linguistics 306; or consent of instructor.

ANT 322K. Southwestern Archaeology.

Prehistory of New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and neighboring areas, from the earliest human occupation to the Spanish conquest. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 322M. Topics in Cultures of the World.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 3: Native American Cultures of the Greater Southwest. Same as American Studies 321 (Topic 1: Native American Cultures of the Greater Southwest). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 5: Indians of Mexico and Guatemala. Same as Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 2: Indians of Mexico and Guatemala). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 10: Mexican American Indigenous Heritage. Same as Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic 23: Mexican American Indigenous Heritage). The prehistory, history, and contemporary racial understanding of Mexican Americans. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 12: Mexican Immigration Cultural History. Same as Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 16). Examines the history of Mexican immigration to the United States, and provides an overview of migratory patterns dating back to the late prehistoric period through contemporary times. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 310L (Topic: Mexican Immigration Cultural History), 322M (Topic 12), Latin American Studies 310 (Topic: Mexican Immigration Cultural History), 324L (Topic 16), Mexican American Studies 319 (Topic: Mexican Immigration Cultural History).

ANT 324L. Topics in Anthropology.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 3: Primitive Technology. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 7: Introduction to African Prehistory. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 322. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 8: Cultures of Southeast Asia. Same as Asian Studies 361 (Topic 5: Cultures of Southeast Asia). Comparative study of the peoples of Indonesia, Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, and other countries. Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 9: The African Diaspora in the Americas. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 321. Black cultures and societies in the New World, and their African heritage. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 10: Colonialism and Nationalism. Same as Asian Studies 361 (Topic 10: Colonialism and Nationalism). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 13: Musics of India. Same as Asian Studies 361 (Topic 11: Musics of India) and Music 342 (Topic 3: Musics of India). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 16: Contemporary India. Same as Asian Studies 361 (Topic 3: Contemporary India).
Topic 17: Nature, Society, and Adaptation. Same as Geography 331K. Long term trajectories of change in human environment relationships, including issues of human evolution and human nature, violence, population, food, agriculture, urbanization, globalizing modernization, and environmental impacts; issues of sustainability, cultural survival, human rights, and environmental protection. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 23: History of Hindu Religious Traditions. Same as Asian Studies 340 (Topic 4: History of Hindu Religious Traditions), History 364G (Topic 1: History of Hindu Religious Traditions), and Religious Studies 321. History of major doctrines, practices, and institutions that shaped the development of Hinduism; how religions adapt to social and cultural change and often provide the catalyst for change. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 24: Archaeology of African Thought. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 372G (Topic 3: Archaeology of African Thought). Archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data as they relate to the foundations of contemporary African and African American societies. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora 372G (Topic 3), 374C (Topic 2), Anthropology 324L (Topic 24).
Topic 26: Race and Sport in African American Life. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 372E (Topic 19) and Kinesiology 352K (Topic 6). Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 372E (Topic 19), 374 (Topic 27), Anthropology 324L (Topic 26), Kinesiology 352K (Topic 6) Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 29: Sacred and Ceremonial Textiles. Same as Islamic Studies 372 (Topic 11), Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 321 (Topic 34), Religious Studies 358 (Topic 11), and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 57). Textiles and material objects indigenous to the Islamic world, and what they reveal about the culture of various Islamic societies. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic 29), Islamic Studies 372 (Topic 11), Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 321 (Topic: Sacred and Ceremonial Textiles), 321 (Topic 34), Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic 24), 328 (Topic: Sacred and Ceremonial Textiles), Religious Studies 358 (Topic: Sacred and Ceremonial Textiles), 358 (Topic 11), Textiles and Apparel 355 (Topic: Sacred and Ceremonial Textiles), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Sacred and Ceremonial Textiles), 340 (Topic 57).
Topic 33: Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Paleontology. Same as Geography 356T (Topic 3: Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing for Archaeology and Paleontology). Designed to give students interested in the fields of archaeology, physical anthropology, and paleontology a foundation in the use of geographical information systems (GIS) and the analysis of remotely sensed data from satellites and aerial photographs. Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 34: Iberian Prehistory and History. The prehistory of Iberia and the historic development of the nation-states of Portugal and Spain. Anthropology 324L (Topic 34) and Latin American Studies 324L (Topic: Iberian Prehistory and History) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Topic 35: Indigenous Rights and Autonomy in Mexico. Explores the relationship between the Mexican government and the indigenous population. Anthropology 324L (Topic 35) and Latin American Studies 324L (Topic: Indigenous Rights and Autonomy in Mexico) may not both be counted.
Topic 36: Nationalism and Gender in South Asia. Same as Asian Studies 361 (Topic 26: Nationalism and Gender in South Asia) and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 24: Nationalism and Gender in South Asia). Explores why nationalist movements often make the reform of women's roles central to their political projects.
Topic 37: The Politics of Race and Violence in Brazil. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 374E (Topic 2: The Politics of Race and Violence in Brazil) and Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 14: The Politics of Race and Violence in Brazil). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 38: Race and the Criminal Justice System. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 372F (Topic 10). Examines historical and contemporary studies that provide arguments about the connections between race, poverty, and the criminal justice system. Subjects include how and why acts of police violence, questionable court proceedings, and unjust sentences routinely take place, and how and why they are often sanctioned by institutional practices and society at large. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 320 (Topic 3), 372F (Topic 10), Anthropology 324L (Topic 38).
Topic 39: Theories of Archaeology. The history of archaeological thought, including the major theoretical trends that have shaped the discipline over time.
Topic 40: Gender, Sexuality, and the Family in Indian Religions and Cultures. Same as Asian Studies 372 (Topic 25: Gender, Sexuality, and the Family in Indian Religions and Cultures), Religious Studies 341 (Topic 3: Gender, Sexuality, and the Family in Indian Religions and Cultures), and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 25: Gender, Sexuality, and the Family in Indian Religions and Cultures). A comprehensive historical overview of gender issues as they are represented in the textual traditions of South Asia.
Topic 41: Science, Technology, and Race. Examines the intersections and linkages between race, science, and technology. Review of the array of current anthropological and sociological studies of science, which regard science as an institutionalized set of cultural practices charged with generating objective knowledge of the world. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 374D (Topic: Science, Technology, and Race), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Science, Technology, and Race), 324L (Topic 41).
Topic 42: United States Latino and Latina Ethnographies. Same as Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic 33). Explores past and present anthropological representations of Latinos and Latinas in the United States. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: U.S. Latino/a Ethnographies), 324L (Topic 42), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: U.S. Latino/a Ethnographies), 374 (Topic 33).
Topic 43: Creative Nonfiction and Ethnography. Explores the convergences and divergences between ethnographic and narrative journalistic writing, and their potential for producing powerful, richly textured accounts that capture the depth of human experience and the complexity of social life. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Creative Nonfiction and Ethnography) and 324L (Topic 43) may not both be counted.
Topic 44: Ethnographic Theory and Practice. An exploration of the complex relationship between anthropological ideas and ethnographic practice. Introduces a broad spectrum of concepts, issues, and theories of culture, and critically examines how these theories and ideas shape anthropological methods and writings. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Ethnographic Theory and Practice) and 324L (Topic 44) may not both be counted.
Topic 45: Queer Ethnographies. Same as Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 58). Anthropological analysis of gender and sexuality that critically evaluates formative concepts and theories that have been subject to recent debates within anthropology, gender studies, and queer theory. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Queer Ethnographies), 324L (Topic 45), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Queer Ethnographies), 340 (Topic 58).
Topic 46: Urban Unrest. Same as Asian American Studies 330 (Topic 6), African and African Diaspora Studies 372F (Topic 13), American Studies 321 (Topic 8), and Urban Studies 354 (Topic 14). Analysis of the roots of urban unrest, exploring a range of origins: joblessness, state violence, white flight, backlash against civil rights gains, new immigration, and interracial strife. Beyond race and class, subjects include exploring unrest as a mode of pushing the normative boundaries of gender and sexuality in public space. Course material will draw from film, literature, history, geography, and anthropology. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 372F (Topic: Urban Unrest), 372F (Topic 13), 374D (Topic: Urban Unrest), American Studies 321 (Topic: Urban Unrest), 321 (Topic 8), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Urban Unrest), 324L (Topic 46), Asian American Studies 330 (Topic: Urban Unrest), 330 (Topic 6), Urban Studies 354 (Topic: Urban Unrest), 354 (Topic 14).
Topic 47: Afro-Caribbean Politics and Culture in Central America. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 326, Latin American Studies 337N, and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 38). Exploration of black identity, political systems, and community activism in Central America and the Caribbean. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 326, 374E (Topic: Afro-Caribbean Politics and Culture in Central America), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Afro-Caribbean Politics and Culture in Central America), 324L (Topic: 47), Government 365N (Topic: Afro-Caribbean Politics and Culture in Central America), Latin American Studies 337M (Topic: Afro-Caribbean Politics and Culture in Central America), 337N, Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Afro-Caribbean Politics and Culture in Central America), 340 (Topic 38). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 48: Sex and Power in the African Diaspora. Same as African and African Diaspora Studies 372G (Topic 33) and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 52). Exploration of various experiences and theories of sex, intimacy, and desire alongside intellectual and artistic engagements with power hierarchies and spirituality across transnational black communities. Subjects include the concept of "erotic subjectivity" from various theoretical and methodological angles, principally within African diasporic contexts. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 372G (Topic: Sex and Power in the African Diaspora), 372G (Topic 33), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Sex and Power in the African Diaspora), 324L (Topic 48), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Sex and Power in the African Diaspora), 340 (Topic 52).
Topic 49: Global Markets and Local Cultures. Same as Asian Studies 361 (Topic 31). Examines contemporary theories of globalization, including materials exploring global governance, international monetary policy, migration regulation, offshoring, and cultural hybridity. Focuses on case studies in Asia and elsewhere that reveal how these practices impact particular communities. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Global Markets and Local Cultures), 324L (Topic 49), Asian Studies 361 (Topic 31), 372 (Topic: Global Markets and Local Cultures), 372 (Topic 26). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 50: Indigenous Naturecultures. Examines contemporary indigenous knowledges and practices about nature and culture. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Indigenous Naturecultures) and 324L (Topic 50) may not both be counted.
Topic 51: The Cities of the Middle East. Same as Islamic Studies 373 (Topic 9), Middle Eastern Studies 341 (Topic 3), and Urban Studies 354 (Topic 15). Anthropological and sociological analysis of space, with a special emphasis on urban theory and culture in the Middle East. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Cities of the Middle East), 324L (Topic 51), Islamic Studies 373 (Topic: Cities of the Middle East), 373 (Topic 9), Middle Eastern Studies 322K (Topic: Cities of the Middle East), 341 (Topic 3), Urban Studies 354 (Topic: Cities of the Middle East), 354 (Topic 15).
Topic 53: Global Indigenous Issues. Same as Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 15). Explores contemporary issues of indigenous peoples around the world through films, literature, and social science readings and focuses on how indigenous peoples are actively working to oppose their oppression and create sustainable futures. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Global Indigenous Issues), 324L (Topic 53), Latin American Studies 324L (Topic: Global Indigenous Issues) 324L (Topic 15).
Topic 54: Black Native American Relations in the United States. Explores the entwined histories, cultures, and identities of African American and Native American people in North America. Subjects include experiences of racial formation, including how race, power, and indigeneity work in different ways for people in contemporary United States society. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 374D (Topic: Black Native Relations in the U.S.), American Studies 321 (Topic: Black Native Relations in the U.S.), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Black Native Relations in the U.S.), Anthropology 324L (Topic 54).
Topic 55: Language, Culture, and the Texas German Experience. Same as American Studies 370 (Topic 47), German, Scandinavian, and Dutch Studies 351C, and Linguistics 373 (Topic 10). The evolution of the culture and language of German immigrants to Texas from the 1840s through the present and how they have influenced other ethnic groups in Texas. Three lectures a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 370 (Topic: Language, Culture, and the Texas German Experience), 370 (Topic 47), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Language, Culture, and the Texas German Experience), 324L (Topic 55), Germanic Civilization 327E (Topic 11) German, Scandinavian, and Dutch Studies 351C, Linguistics 350 (Topic: Language, Culture, and the Texas German Experience), 373 (Topic 10). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 56: Ethnographic Writing. Writing workshop consisting of a series of exercises to add density and texture to ethnographic description by including attention to scene, character, event, situation, and dialogue. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Ethnographic Writing), 324L (Topic: Writing Ethnography), 324L (Topic 56). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 57: Archaeology of Climate Change. Examines why climate changes, the methods for recording climate change, and includes case studies of the varied responses of past human societies to climate change in different geographic regions and time periods with varying socio-political and economic systems. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Archaeology of Climate Change), 324L (Topic 57), Geography 356 (Topic: Archaeology of Climate Change). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 58: Digital Data Systems in Archaeology. Designed to help students understand the basic knowledge and skills needed to operate digital equipment (e.g. GPS and Total Data Stations) commonly used for collecting location data on archaeological sites. Instruction on mapping and grid systems translates into "hands-on" instrument operation in simulated archaeological field conditions. Provides an introduction to GIS software and its applications in archaeology as well as an overview of near-surface sensing techniques. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Digital Data Systems in Archaeology) and 324L (Topic 58) may not both be counted. Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 59: Graffiti and Poster Art in the Islamic World. Same as Islamic Studies 373 (Topic 17), Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 321 (Topic 36), Middle Eastern Studies 342 (Topic 44), Religious Studies 358 (Topic 21), and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 67). Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Graffiti/Poster Art: Islam World), 324L (Topic 59), Islamic Studies 373 (Topic: Graffiti/Poster Art: Islam World), 373 (Topic 17), Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures 321 (Topic: Graffiti/Poster Art: Islam World), 321 (Topic 36), Middle Eastern Studies 342 (Topic: Graffiti/Poster Art: Islam World), 342 (Topic 44), Religious Studies 358 (Topic: Graffiti/Poster Art: Islam World), 358 (Topic 21), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Graffiti/Poster Art: Islam World), 340 (Topic 67). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 63: Food and Culture. Examines cultural and linguistic views on eating and how we talk about what we eat in the contemporary era. Combines scholarly literature, videos, and readings about food subjects that circulate in popular culture, and considers how flows of dietary images and discourses shape race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and other identifications. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Food and Culture) and 324L (Topic 63) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 64: The Bronze Age and the Iron Age in Atlantic Europe. Introduction to the archaeology of Atlantic Europe with particular emphasis on the Bronze Age and Iron Age periods. Examines the diversity and commonalities of European adaptations, investigates how geography influenced trade of goods and ideas, as well as the profound changes brought about by a new conceptualization of the world and the innovations of the Bronze and Iron Ages. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Bronze Age and Iron Age Atlantic Europe) and 324L (Topic 64) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 65: Anthropology for Liberation. Takes a critical look at anthropologists' quests to shifting the legacy of anthropology from the colonial toward freedom and liberation. Explores anthropology's relationship to human rights, violence, questions of race, gender, and sexuality, imperialism and neoliberalism, and the ways that some anthropologists have chosen to use their field work in new and different ways. Only one of the following may be counted: African and African Diaspora Studies 372C (Topic: Anthropology for Liberation), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Anthropology for Liberation), 324L (Topic 65), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Anthropology for Liberation). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 66: Indigenizing Queer Theory. Introduction to emerging work by indigenous queer theorists, largely from the United States. Examines cultural conflicts between the west and indigenous world views and practices surrounding monogamy and marriage, same-sex marriage, enforced gender binaries, sexual identities and practices, their regulation by the colonial state, and implications for indigenous people. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Indigenizing Queer Theory), 324L (Topic 66), Women and Gender Studies 335 (Topic: Indigenizing Queer Theory). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 325J. The Photographic Image.

Applies concepts and practices from visual ethnography to the study of memory, place, and everyday life. Subjects include developing counterintuitive and subversive approaches to practices of looking and techniques of representation. Two lecture hours and two lab hours a week for one semester. Anthropology 325L (Topic: The Photographic Image) and 325J may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 325L. Cultural Studies, Public Culture, and Folklore: Selected Topics.

Consideration of folklore in different culture areas of the Western Hemisphere. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 11: Cultural Heritage on Display. Explores the public construction and display of traditional American folk culture by studying popular folklife-oriented tourist sites. American Studies 321 (Topic: Cultural Heritage on Display) and Anthropology 325L (Topic 11) may not both be counted.
Topic 12: Russian Myths and Folktales. Same as Comparative Literature 323 (Topic 34) and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic 22). Examination of the Russian folktale, its roots in ancient, pre-Christian Slavic religious tradition, its connections with other forms of folklore such as myth and legend, and its transformation in modern Russian literature. Subjects include the continuing influence of folklore explored through various aspects of Russian culture, including literature, music, ballet, film, and popular culture. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 325L (Topic: Russian Myths and Folk Tales), 325L (Topic 12), Comparative Literature 323 (Topic: Russian Myths and Folk Tales), 323 (Topic 34), Russian 330 (Topic: Russian Myths and Folk Tales), 330 (Topic 9), Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic: Russian Myths and Folk Tales), 325 (Topic 22). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 13: Representation of Jews in the American Public Sphere. Same as Jewish Studies 365 (Topic 11) and Religious Studies 346 (Topic 8). Examines how Jews have been represented and constituted in American public culture as a race, religion, and/or nation through distinct institutions and display practices. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 325L (Topic: Representation of Jews in the American Public Sphere), 325L (Topic 13), Jewish Studies 365 (Topic: Representation of Jews in the American Public Sphere), 365 (Topic 11), Religious Studies 346 (Topic: Representation of Jews in the American Public Sphere), 346 (Topic 8).
Topic 14: Traveling Culture. Examines mobility as a point of inquiry into questions of identity, community, belonging, place and landscape, art, representation, cultural difference, experience, and history. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 325L (Topic: Traveling Culture), 325L (Topic 14), Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies 325 (Topic: Traveling Culture).
Topic 15: Practices of Looking. Develops methodological and analytic tools for the examination of visual culture. Anthropology 325L (Topic: Practices of Looking) and 325L (Topic 15) may not both be counted.
Topic 17: American Jewish Material Culture. Same as Jewish Studies 365 (Topic 12) and Religious Studies 346 (Topic 9). Examines the interplay between material culture and Jewish identity and thought in contemporary America. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 325L (Topic: American Jewish Material Culture), 325L (Topic 17), Jewish Studies 365 (Topic: American Jewish Material Culture), 365 (Topic 12), Religious Studies 346 (Topic: American Jewish Material Culture), 346 (Topic 9).
Topic 18: Ethnographies of Emotion. Writing workshop with subjects including place, character, objects, subjects, cultural forms, everyday life, and feeling states or structures such as trauma, love, hope, depression, the even keel, and melodrama. Explores how to articulate structures of feeling with models of culture and the self and examines and experiments with modes of ethnographic attention, the importance of the telling detail and methods of participant observation. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Ethnographies of Emotion), 325L (Topic: Ethnographies of Emotion), 325L (Topic 18). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 325M. Language in Culture and Society.

Same as Linguistics 373 (Topic 3: Language in Culture and Society) and Sociology 352M (Topic 4: Language in Culture and Society). Language as a cultural resource; functions of language in society; survey of language communities. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302, 305, 307, or Linguistics 306; or consent of instructor.

ANT 325N. Language and Speech in American Society.

Same as American Studies 321 (Topic 2: Language and Speech in American Society), Linguistics 373 (Topic 2: Language and Speech in American Society), and Sociology 352M (Topic 3: Language and Speech in American Society). Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Anthropology 302, 305, 307, or Linguistics 306.

ANT 326C. Native Americans in Texas.

Same as American Studies 321G. Studies the history of Native Americans in Texas using concepts and evidence from anthropology, history, archaeology, historical geography, and Native American studies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 321 (Topic: Native Americans in Texas), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Native Americans in Texas), 326C. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 326D. Native Americans in the Plains.

The ethnohistory of some of the most influential Native American groups on the plains, from the arrival of the Spanish through the reservation period. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 321 (Topic: Native Americans in the Plains), Anthropology 324L (Topic: Native Americans in the Plains), 326D, History 365G (Topic: Native Americans in the Plains. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 326E. Plains Archaeology: Prehistory and History.

Explores the evidence of human activities on the central and southern plains from prehistoric to historical times (ca. 11,000 BC to ca. AD 1850). Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Plains Archaeology: Prehistory and History) and 326E may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 326F. Great Discoveries in Archaeology.

Same as European Studies 346 (Topic 2: Great Discoveries in Archaeology). The stories, myths, and people behind some of the great archaeological discoveries. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Great Discoveries in Archaeology), Anthropology 326F, European Studies 346 (Topic 2). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 326L. Cultures in Contact.

History of the interactions of the indigenous peoples of the Americas with Africans, Asians, and Europeans over the past five hundred years. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 327C. Topics in American Cultures.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

Topic 1: Race and Ethnicity in the United States.

ANT 327D. Colonial Latin American Archaeology.

Same as Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 13: Colonial Latin American Archaeology). Focuses on the Spanish colonies in Latin America. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: Colonial Latin American Archaeology), 327D, Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 13).

ANT 129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Anthropology.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Anthropology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

ANT 330C. Theories of Culture and Society.

Examination of the theoretical approaches that have established the intellectual foundations of contemporary sociocultural anthropology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 432L. Primate Anatomy.

Comparative and functional anatomy of primates, including humans; emphasis on adaptations and evolution of the various taxa. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 334L. North American Archaeology.

Regional cultural development of Native American societies from the earliest human occupations to the historic period. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.

ANT 336L. Native American Cultures North of Mexico.

Same as American Studies 321 (Topic 3: Native American Cultures North of Mexico). Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 340C. Ethnographic Research Methods.

Introduction to methods used in conducting ethnographic research; emphasis on research design, analysis, writing, and ethical considerations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302, 305, or 307.

ANT 344K. Films: An Anthropological Perspective.

Films viewed and discussed. How is cultural meaning communicated? What systems of signification are involved? What are possibilities and limitations of ethnographic films? Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 345C. Urban Cultures.

The culture of cities, including the distinctive forms of expressive culture, ethnic and racial conflict, and political or economic activity that cities generate. Three lecture hours a week or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 346L. Primate Social Behavior.

Studies primate behavior and why primates do what they do, including basic theoretical principles and the models used to explain primate behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 346M. Comparative Primate Ecology.

The basics of how organisms interact with their environment, focusing on a wide range of primates from a comparative perspective. Discusses how various aspects of ecology are used to conserve primate populations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 347C. Methods in Primate Biology.

The study of primate behavior and the methods by which animal behavior is observed and documented. Students conduct a research project and write a report. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 346L , 346M , or Biology 359K with a grade of at least C.

ANT 348. Human Origins and Evolution.

Detailed examination and analysis of morphological trends evident in the hominid fossil record. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 348K. Current Topics in Biological (Physical) Anthropology.

An in-depth study of current topics, controversies, and literature on the evolution, morphology, genetics, and behavioral ecology of primates, including humans. Three lecture hours a week for one semester; additional hours may be required for some topics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

Topic 1: Human Evolution.
Topic 8: Evolutionary Anatomy of the Head and Neck. The comparative and functional anatomy of the head and neck in primates and other mammals.
Topic 9: Introduction to Primate Anatomy. Explores the relationship between primate anatomical form and function.
Topic 10: Primate Conservation. The theory and practices of conservation biology as applied to primates. Explores species and community characteristics influencing extinction risk, current threats to primates, and potential conservation strategies.
Topic 11: Early Hominid Evolution. Examines the early stages of human evolution in Africa starting from the last common great ape ancestor through the origin of the genus Homo, looking at the behavioral and morphological adaptations that characterize the earliest stages of human evolution. Anthropology 348K (Topic: Early Hominid Evolution) and 348K (Topic 11) may not both be counted.
Topic 12: Sex and Human Nature. Provides an introduction to the scientific study of sexual behavior, mate choice, and reproduction in humans from the perspective of evolutionary biology; examines a wide range of genetic, ecological, social, physiological, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality. Anthropology 348K (Topic: Sex and Human Nature) and 348K (Topic 12) may not both be counted.
Topic 13: Adaptation and Human Behavior. Focuses on the analysis of human behavior and institutions from an evolutionary, adaptationist perspective. Examines subjects of central interest in the social sciences and traces the development of adaptationist approaches and evaluates their application to studying human behavior and social practices. Anthropology 348K (Topic: Adaptation and Human Behavior) and 348K (Topic 13) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 349C. Human Variation.

The patterns of biological variation within and between human populations. Examines physical, genetic, and behavioral traits, and considers both the microevolutionary and cultural processes that influence those traits. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Anthropology 348K (Topic: Human Variation) and 349C may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 349D. Anthropological Genetics.

Basic principles of molecular genetics and population genetics as they relate to the study of humans and other primates. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Anthropology 348K (Topic: Anthropological Genetics) and 349D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 350C. Primate Sensory Ecology.

An integrated perspective on the comparative anatomy, physiology, and ecological significance of sensory adaptations in primates. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 350M. Evolution of Primate Behavior.

Mechanisms underlying the evolution of human and nonhuman primate behavior. The reasons and ways primates live in social groups; comparisons between human and nonhuman primates using living primates, fossil remains, and archaeological evidence. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 351E. Primate Evolution.

Examination of the fossil record for nonhuman primate evolution, including basic concepts of the anatomy, ecology, and systematics of living primates. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 301.

ANT 453. Archaeological Analysis.

Derivation of chronology and cultural information from archaeological data; the role of archaeology in modern life. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 304 or Archaeology 301.

ANT 353E. Archaeological Laboratory Analysis.

The analysis of artifacts, features, architecture, and other remains recovered in the field. Four and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Anthropology 324L (Topic: Archaeological Laboratory Analysis) and 353E may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Anthropology 662.

ANT 358Q. Supervised Research.

Individual instruction. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 360K. The Civilization of the Maya.

Same as Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 10: The Civilization of the Maya). Maya prehistory and history: the archaeological record, codices and inscriptions, and Spanish conquest writings. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 361K. The Civilizations of Ancient Mexico.

Same as Latin American Studies 324L (Topic 11: The Civilizations of Ancient Mexico). Mexican cultures from earliest prehistory to the European conquest. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302 and six semester hours of upper-division coursework in social science.

ANT 662. Field Archaeology.

Two hundred and forty hours of fieldwork. May be repeated for credit, but may be taken only once on the letter-grade basis. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 362K. Archaeology of Texas and Vicinity.

Cultural history of Texas and neighboring areas, from early prehistoric times to Anglo-American settlements. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

ANT 462M. Archaeological Techniques.

Problems in planning, organizing, and carrying out archaeological surveys and excavations. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 453.

ANT 366. Anatomy and Biology of the Human Skeleton.

Comprehensive study of the human skeleton, with special attention to methods of identification. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Anthropology 301.

ANT 374M. Sociolinguistics.

Same as Linguistics 374M. An in-depth treatment of current interests in sociolinguistic research literature. Subjects include language and gender; social, regional, and ethnic dialects of American English; language use in African American communities; language and identity in a pluralistic society; and language, literacy, and education. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Anthropology 302 or Linguistics 306.

ANT 376P, 676P. Research Internship.

Restricted to anthropology majors. Supervised fieldwork in a business or community setting related to the student's career and research interests. Students conduct research and apply anthropological skills to real-world problems. Approximately 150 or 300 hours of fieldwork. May be repeated for credit, but no more than six semester hours may be counted toward the major requirement. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

ANT 379. Problems in Anthropology.

Supervised individual research on selected problems in anthropology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in anthropology and consent of instructor.

ANT 679H. Honors Tutorial Course.

For honors candidates in anthropology. Individual reading of selected works for one semester, followed in the second semester by the writing of an honors thesis. Conference course for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Anthropology Honors Program; for 679HB, Anthropology 679HA.

Science, Technology, and Society: STS

Lower-Division Courses

STS 101. Key Ideas and Issues in Science, Technology, and Society.

Designed to introduce students to the main areas of interest in science, technology, and society. Lectures, readings, and discussions include speakers from various academic disciplines. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

STS 311. Topics in Science, Technology, and Society.

Some topics may include an academic service-learning component. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

STS 318. How We Shape Discoveries and How They Shape Us.

Technical, historical, and cultural approaches to the multiple dimensions and complexities of scientific and technological innovation, and how they shape and are shaped by society. Cases for discussion are drawn from energy discoveries, nanoscience, biomedicine, and materials science advances. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

STS 319. Information Technology and Social Life.

The impact of technologies on social life, and the necessity for applying skills developed in the liberal arts to managing new ways of life mediated through technologies, including work and home environments. Includes an academic service-learning component. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

Upper-Division Courses

STS 321. Introduction to Science, Technology, and Society.

Introduction to the history of communication technology, including how past innovations shaped societies and how current changes are transforming human cultures, universities, and the liberal arts. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of at least thirty semester hours of coursework.

STS 331. Topics in Science, Technology, and Society.

Some topics may include an academic service-learning component. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

STS 332. The Nanotechnology and Science Revolution.

The societal impacts of nanotechnology and how this emerging technology might transform the future of technologies, manufacturing, and innovation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Science, Technology, and Society 331 (Topic: Impacts of Science: Nanotechnology, Technology, and Life) and 332 may not both be counted.

STS 360. Senior Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society.

Senior capstone seminar. Allows the student to integrate the knowledge he or she has gained in the major field of study with that provided by the concentration in science, technology, and society. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of at least ninety semester hours of coursework, including Science, Technology, and Society 321.

STS 367. Conference Course in Science, Technology, and Society.

Supervised work on specific projects in science, technology, and society. Three conference hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Completion of at least thirty-six semester hours of coursework and approval of written application by the supervising instructor.

STS 370. Research Internship.

Supervised fieldwork in a business or community setting related to the student's career and research interests. Approximately six to ten hours of work a week for one semester, to be arranged with faculty member and internship sponsor. May be repeated for credit, but no more than six semester hours of Science, Technology, and Society 370 may be counted toward the concentration requirement. Prerequisite: Science, Technology, and Society 321, upper-division standing, and consent of instructor.