Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Mexican American Studies: MAS

Lower-Division Courses

MAS 301. Introduction to Mexican American and Latina/o Studies.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Mexican American Studies 301 and 319 (Topic: Introduction to Mexican American and Latina/o Studies) may not both be counted.

MAS 307. Introduction to Mexican American Cultural Studies.

An introduction to the theoretical and substantive issues covered under the interdisciplinary rubric of cultural studies. Explores the Mexican American cultural experience through the methodological approaches of historical analysis, cultural critique, and literary production. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

MAS 308. Introduction to Mexican American Policy Studies.

An introduction to the basics of policy analysis, employing demographic and empirical information on the Mexican American and Latino populations in the United States. Current policy issues such as bilingual education, affirmative action, the English-only movement, immigration, Latino consumers, Latino entrepreneurship, and NAFTA. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

MAS 309. Bilingualism in the Americas.

Analyzes the linguistic, cognitive, social, and cultural aspect of bilingualism in the Americas. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Mexican American Studies 309 and 319 (Topic: Bilingualism in the Americas) may not both be counted.

MAS 310 (TCCN: HUMA 1305). Chicanos in American Society.

Same as Sociology 309. Introduction to the study of American character and its bearing on the Chicano experience. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

MAS 311. Ethnicity and Gender: La Chicana.

Same as Sociology 308D and Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 6). Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mexican American Studies 311, 319 (Topic 1), Sociology 308 (Topic: Ethnicity and Gender: La Chicana), 308D, Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 6).

MAS 314. Mexican American Literature and Culture.

Same as English 314V (Topic 3: Mexican American Literature and Culture). Representative Chicano writers and genres, such as poetry, prose fiction, and theatre. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. English 314V (Topic 3) and Mexican American Studies 314 may not both be counted. May not be substituted for English 316L (or 316K), 316M (or 316K), 316N (or 316K), 316P (or 316K). Prerequisite: English 603A, Rhetoric and Writing 306, 306Q, or Tutorial Course 603A.

MAS 316. History of Mexican Americans in the United States.

Same as History 314K. Examines the origin and growth of the Mexican American community in the United States. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.

MAS 318. Mexican American Culture.

Same as Anthropology 318L. Mexican American cultural distinctiveness in the areas of social organization, child rearing, food culture, folklore, language, and religion. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

MAS 319. Special Topics.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 2: The Chicano Movement. Analyzes the history and legacy of the Chicano Movement in order to understand its origins, strategies, challenges, and successes. Mexican American Studies 319 (Topic: The History of the Chicano Movement) and 319 (Topic 2) may not both be counted.
Topic 3: Latino Histories. Same as History 317L (Topic 11). Explore the cultures, politics, and policies that shape the many Latino histories in the United States. Only one of the following may be counted: History 317L (Topic: Latino Histories), 317L (Topic 11), Mexican American Studies 319 (Topic: Latino Histories), 319 (Topic 3).
Topic 4: Mexican American Women, 1910-Present. Same as History 317L (Topic 12) and Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 13). Examines the history of Mexican and Mexican American women in the United States from the twentieth century to the present. Only one of the following may be counted: History 317L (Topic: Mexican American Women, 1910-Present), 317L (Topic 12), Mexican American Studies 319 (Topic: Mexican American Women, 1910-Present), 319 (Topic 4), Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic: Mexican American Women, 1910-Present), 301 (Topic 13).
Topic 5: Chicano Literature and Popular Culture. Explores the ways in which Chicana/o creative writers have addressed their experiences in the United States. Mexican American Studies 319 (Topic: Chicano Literature and Popular Culture) and 319 (Topic 5) may not both be counted.
Topic 6: Comparative Latina/o Immigration to the United States. Only one of the following may be counted: Mexican American Studies 319 (Topic: Comparative Latina/o Immigration to the United States of America), 319 (Topic 6), Social Work 311 (Topic: Comparative Latina/o Immigration to the United States of America).

MAS 119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Mexican American Studies.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Center for Mexican American Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

MAS 320L. Texas until 1845.

Same as History 320L. A study of Texas from before the European discovery through the exploration and mission periods to status as a Mexican colony and an independent republic. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: History 320L, Mexican American Studies 320L, 374 (Topic: Texas until 1845). Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

MAS 326. Learning from Mexico City: NAFTA, Neoliberalism, and Narco Cultura.

Restricted to students participating in the summer program in Mexico City, Mexico. Examines the historic rise of neoliberal reform and narco culture as a tie to the North American Free Trade Agreement brokered between the United States, Canada, and Mexico in 1994. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Mexican American Studies 326 and Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: NAFTA/Neoliberalism/Narco Cul) may not both be counted.

MAS 129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Mexican American Studies.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Center for Mexican American Studies. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer work is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

MAS 350. Advanced Grammar and Composition for Bilingual/Bicultural Speakers.

Designed for Hispanic bilingual students whose home language is Spanish, but whose dominant language is English. The principal objective is to learn to write correctly and proficiently and to gain a strong cultural perspective on Latin America. The main focus of the course is on writing discourse, but oral language development is also addressed. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. International Business 372 (Topic 8: Business Spanish) and Mexican American Studies 350 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Spanish 612 or 312L.

MAS 361. Mexican American Cultural Studies Seminar.

Explores cultural studies literature as read through the experience of the Mexican-origin community in the United States. Discussions include race, class, and feminism. Students write a research paper and deliver a scholarly presentation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Mexican American Studies 307.

MAS 362. Mexican American Policy Studies Seminar.

Profiles the current economic status of Mexican Americans in the United States. Examines two dimensions of public policy: historical trends and comparisons with other ethnic groups. Students write a policy report and deliver a professional presentation. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Mexican American Studies 362 and 374 (Topic: Mexican American Public Policy Issues) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Mexican American Studies 308.

MAS 363. Sociolinguistics in Mexican American and Latina/o Studies.

Examines the presence and use of language in the United States with focus on aspects affecting Latina/o communities. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Mexican American Studies 363 and 374 (Topic: Sociolinguistics in Mexican American and Latina/o Studies) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

MAS 364. History of the United States-Mexico Borderland.

Same as History 365G (Topic 12). Introduction to the history of the United States and Mexico border region. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: History 365G (Topic: History of the United States-Mexico Borderland), 365G (Topic 12), Mexican American Studies 364, 374 (Topic: History of the United States-Mexico Borderland). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

MAS 371. Readings in Mexican American Studies.

Supervised readings with parallel work in relevant non-Chicano materials; preparation for Mexican American Studies 372. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: Mexican American Studies 310, 318, and 374; or consent of the director.

MAS 372. Research Seminar in Mexican American Studies.

Supervised research on a Mexican American topic chosen in consultation with adviser and leading to a full-length essay. Individual instruction. Prerequisite: Mexican American Studies 310, 318, and 374; or consent of the director.

MAS 373. Independent Research.

Individual instruction. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Mexican American Studies 310, 318, and 374; or consent of the director.

MAS 374. Special Topics.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Additional hours are required for some topics. Some topics partially fulfill legislative requirement for American history. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 2: Life and Literature of the Southwest--Mexican American. Same as English 342 (Topic 1: Life and Literature of the Southwest--Mexican American). Verse, fiction, travels, and memoirs, to acquaint students with the literature reflecting the social inheritance of Texas and the neighboring territory. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of coursework in English or rhetoric and writing.
Topic 15: Latino Politics. Same as Latin American Studies 337M (Topic 8: Latino Politics) and Government 370K (Topic 2: Latino Politics). Prerequisite: Six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.
Topic 16: Texas, 1914 to the Present. Same as History 320R and Urban Studies 353 (Topic 2). The steady dissociation of Texas from its Old South status to a transitional state and a power in national politics. Three semester hours of Texas history may be substituted for half of the legislative requirement for American history. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 22: Minorities and the Media. Issues concerning minority or nondominant groups within the United States. Survey of minority communication problems: alienation, fragmentation, media and Internet access; criticism and feedback for minority groups based on racial/ethnic background, age, sex, disability, social or economic class, and sexual orientation. Only one of the following may be counted: Journalism 340C (Topic 1: Mass Media and Minorities), 341H, 341J, Latin American Studies 322 (Topic 10: Minorities and the Media), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic 22: Minorities and the Media), Urban Studies 354 (Topic: Minorities and the Media), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 21). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 23: Mexican American Indigenous Heritage. Same as Anthropology 322M (Topic 10: Mexican American Indigenous Heritage). The prehistory, history, and contemporary racial understanding of Mexican Americans. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 32: Radical Latinos. Same as American Studies 370 (Topic 39: Radical Latinos). Examines the social positioning and history of Latinas/os in the United States. Analyzes the histories of Latinas/os who have gone against mainstream expectations, or who have challenged or critiqued the status quo in provocative and unexpected ways. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 370 (Topic Radical Latinos), 370 (Topic 39), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: Radical Latinos), 374 (Topic 32). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 33: United States Latino and Latina Ethnographies. Same as Anthropology 324L (Topic 42). Explores past and present anthropological representations of Latinos and Latinas in the United States. Only one of the following may be counted: Anthropology 324L (Topic: U.S. Latino/a Ethnographies), 324L (Topic 42), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: U.S. Latino/a Ethnographies), 374 (Topic 33).
Topic 34: Writing Border Narratives. Same as Creative Writing 325 (Topic 1). Examines the United States and Mexico border through the use of the personal essay in its various forms. Students write personal essays that focus on their relationships to the border. Only one of the following may be counted: Creative Writing 325 (Topic: Writing Border Narratives), 325 (Topic 1), English 325 (Topic: Writing Border Narratives), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: Writing Border Narratives), 374 (Topic 34). Additional prerequisite: Comparative Literature 315, English 603B, 316L (or 316K), 316M (or 316K), 316N (or 316K), 316P (or 316K), or Tutorial Course 603B.
Topic 35: Race and Citizenship in United States History. Same as American Studies 370 (Topic 48) and History 350R (Topic 25). Uses primary and secondary sources to analyze how race and citizenship have functioned for populations of color in the United States. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 370 (Topic: Race and Citizenship in United States History), 370 (Topic 48), History 350R (Topic: Race and Citizenship in United States History), 350R (Topic 25), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: Race and Citizenship in United States History), 374 (Topic 35). Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.
Topic 37: United States Catholic History. Same as American Studies 327 (Topic 4), History 365G (Topic 1), and Religious Studies 346 (Topic 5). Examines how Catholicism and national identity work for Catholics in the United States, with an emphasis on Catholic women and Latinos/as. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 321 (Topic: United States Catholic History), 327 (Topic 4), History 365G (Topic: United States Catholic History), 365G (Topic 1), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: United States Catholic History), 374 (Topic 37), Religious Studies 346 (Topic: United States Catholic History), 346 (Topic 5). Partially fulfills legislative requirement for American history.
Topic 38: Feminist Interventions in Borderlands History. Same as American Studies 370 (Topic 45) and Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic 45). Provides an in-depth understanding of the social, economic, and spatial transformations of the United States/Mexico borderlands in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 370 (Topic: Feminist Interventions in Borderlands History), 370 (Topic 45), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: Feminist Interventions in Borderlands History), 374 (Topic 38), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Feminist Interventions in Borderlands History), 340 (Topic 45).
Topic 39: Latina/o Pop. Same as American Studies 370 (Topic 46). Examines how Latinas/os have been a major force in the production of popular culture. Only one of the following may be counted: American Studies 370 (Topic: Latina/o Pop), 370 (Topic 46), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: Latina/o Pop), 374 (Topic 39).
Topic 40: Gender, Class, and Ethnicity American Literature and Film. Examines the ways in which authors and filmmakers construct gender, class, and identity in each of their texts. Only one of the following may be counted: English 344L (Topic: Gender/Class/Ethnic American Literature and Film), Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: Gender/Class/Ethnic American Literature and Film), 374 (Topic 40), Women's and Gender Studies 340 (Topic: Gender/Class/Ethnic American Literature and Film). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 41: Border Control and Deaths. Same as Sociology 323D. Focus on enactment of border control policies, policy implementation and death patterns at the United States-Mexico border, patterns of unauthorized border crossings through dangerous border terrain, grassroots movements to support migrants and lessen deaths, and the ethics of coercive border control. Surveys the public sentiments and attitudes that support new border control policies, the patterns of migrant deaths in deserts and in the Rio Grande River associated with border control strategies, movements and community efforts to support migrants in the Arizona border area, and legal and ethical arguments and concepts that frame discussions of migrant deaths at the United States-Mexico border. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Mexican American Studies 374 (Topic: Border Control/Deaths), 374 (Topic 41), Sociology 321K (Topic: Border Control/Deaths), 323D. Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

MAS 375. Internship.

Restricted to Mexican American studies majors. Students participate in a nonpartisan, direct-service capacity in a community, civic, or government organization or program that facilitates the economic, political, and social development of the Mexican American community. Under the supervision of a faculty member, students write a report based on the internship project. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Additional weekly meeting times are sometimes required. With consent of the director or academic adviser, may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Mexican American Studies 310, 318, and 374; or consent of the director.

MAS 177. Mellon Mays Program Seminar.

Restricted to students accepted to the Mellon Mays Program. Seminar designed as an interdisciplinary primer to the exploration of research, writing, and professionalization in preparation for doctoral study. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

MAS 679H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Restricted to Mexican American studies majors. Supervised research, readings, and writing of a substantial paper on a Mexican American studies topic. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, Mexican American Studies 361, 362, or 372 with a grade of A; admission to the Mexican American Studies Honors Program no later than two semesters before expected graduation; a University grade point average of at least 3.00; and a grade point average in Mexican American studies of at least 3.50; for 679HB, Mexican American Studies 679HA.