Degrees and Programs

The College of Liberal Arts offers four degree programs: the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I; the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II; the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science with a major in geographical sciences; and the Bachelor of Science in Psychology. The requirements of the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I are described in Bachelor of Arts, Plan I. The Bachelor of Arts, Plan II, a broad liberal arts honors program for outstanding students, is described in Bachelor of Arts, Plan II.

The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Natural Sciences, and the Jackson School of Geological Sciences, is designed for students interested in an interdisciplinary scientific perspective on environmental issues, analysis, and management. Students pursuing the degree through the College of Liberal Arts major in geographical sciences. The requirements for the degree are given in Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science.

The Bachelor of Science in Psychology is designed to offer students a more extensive scientific program than the Bachelor of Arts with a major in psychology. The requirements for the BSPsy are given in Bachelor of Science in Psychology.

A student may not earn more than one Bachelor of Arts degree from the University. A student may not earn more than one Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science degree from the University. A student may not earn both the Bachelor of Arts with a major in psychology and the Bachelor of Science in Psychology. 

The title of a graduate’s degree appears on his or her diploma, but the major does not. Both the degree and the major appear on the graduate’s University transcript.

Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity (PED) courses and Kinesiology 119 may not be counted toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts. However, they are counted as courses for which the student is enrolled, and the grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC Courses

ROTC units are maintained on campus by the Departments of Air Force Science, Military Science, and Naval Science. Information about each program is available from the chair of the department.

Nine semester hours of designated University of Texas at Austin coursework in air force science, military science, or naval science may be counted toward any degree in the College of Liberal Arts. In general, this credit may be used only as electives or to fulfill the writing requirement. However, cross-listed courses may be used as appropriate to fulfill other degree requirements. A list of approved ROTC courses is available in the College of Liberal Arts, Student Division, Dorothy Gebauer Building 2.200.

Conference Courses and Internship Courses

No more than six semester hours of credit earned in conference courses may be counted toward a single major in the College of Liberal Arts; no more than nine semester hours may be counted toward the degree.

No more than six semester hours of credit earned in internship courses may be counted toward a single major in the College of Liberal Arts; no more than nine semester hours may be counted toward the degree.

In addition, no more than nine semester hours of conference courses and internship courses combined may be counted toward a single major in the College of Liberal Arts; no more than 12 hours of conference courses and internship courses combined may be counted toward the degree.

Bible Courses

Bible courses may be counted as lower-division electives in College of Liberal Arts degree programs that have room for such electives. No more than 12 semester hours of Bible courses may be counted toward any degree offered by the University.

Admission Deficiencies

Students admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove them by the means prescribed in the General Information Catalog. Contact the dean’s office for further information.

Correspondence and Extension Courses

Credit that a University student in residence earns simultaneously by correspondence or extension from the University or elsewhere or in residence at another school will not be counted toward a degree in the College of Liberal Arts unless specifically approved in advance by the dean. In very special circumstances, the dean may allow a student in residence to take one or more courses by extension or correspondence. No more than 30 percent of the semester hours required for any degree offered in the College of Liberal Arts may be taken by correspondence. For additional information about correspondence work by resident students, see the General Information Catalog. 

Courses Taken on the Pass/Fail Basis

No more than 19 semester hours of coursework completed on the pass/fail basis may be counted toward the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II; no more than 16 semester hours of such coursework may be counted toward the other degrees in the college. In general, only electives may be taken on the pass/fail basis. Complete rules on registration on the pass/fail basis are given in the General Information Catalog.

Courses in a Single Field

No more than 36 semester hours (39 for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I) may be counted in any one field of study, including the major, unless major requirements state otherwise. No more than 36  semester hours (39 for the Bachelor of Arts, Plan I) may be counted in any one college or school other than the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences.

UTeach-Liberal Arts

UTeach-Liberal Arts is a professional teacher preparation program for liberal arts students pursuing academic majors in Arabic, Chinese, economics, English, French, history, geography, German, government, Japanese, Latin, Middle Eastern Studies, Russian, and Spanish. Students may seek certification to teach middle school or secondary for the following certification areas:

  1. Languages other than English, early childhood through grade 12
  2. History, grades seven through 12
  3. Social studies, grades four through eight or seven through 12
  4. English language arts and reading, grades four through eight or seven through 12

UTeach-Liberal Arts offers a four-semester program for undergraduate students and a three-semester program for postbaccalaureate students. Admission into the program is required. Undergraduate students may enter the program as early as the second semester of their freshman year.

UTeach-Liberal Arts students benefit from an innovative program that emphasizes practical, hands-on field experience in local schools combined with intensive coursework. Students experience a firsthand glimpse into the world of teaching with a gradual increase in coursework requirements and internship hours throughout the length of the program. Key features of the program include cohort support, discipline-specific pedagogical preparation, literacy training, and effective use of instructional technology. More information about UTeach-Liberal Arts and the admission process is available online.

State of Texas teacher certification requirements are governed by the Texas Education Agency and are subject to change. Students must adhere to current teacher certification requirements, even if they differ from those listed in the University catalogs.

Professional Development Sequence

All students seeking teacher certification must complete the following courses:

RequirementsHours
UTL 101Introduction to the Teaching Profession1
UTL 202Introduction to Teaching in the Middle School2
UTL 640Teaching in Secondary Schools6
UTL 360Problems and Principles of Secondary Education3
UTL 670Directed Teaching in Secondary Schools6
ALD 322Individual Differences3
EDP 350GAdolescent Development3

For those seeking certification for languages other than English, early childhood through grade 12:

Requirements:

See the corresponding degree plan for the language you wish to teach for other required courses: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Russian, and Spanish.

For those seeking certification in history, grades seven through 12:

RequirementsHours
HIS 301FThe Premodern World3
HIS 309LWestern Civilization in Modern Times3
HIS 315KThe United States, 1492-18653
HIS 315LThe United States since 18653
HIS 320LTexas until 18453
or HIS 320P Texas, 1845-1914
or HIS 320R Texas, 1914 to the Present

For those seeking certification in social studies, grades four through eight:

RequirementsHours
EDC 339FAdolescent Literacy3
Introduction to Economics Course3
Cultural Geography Course3
Physical Geography Courses6
M 316KFoundations of Arithmetic3
M 316LFoundations of Geometry, Statistics, and Probability3
HIS 301FThe Premodern World3
HIS 309LWestern Civilization in Modern Times3
HIS 315KThe United States, 1492-18653
HIS 315LThe United States since 18653
HIS 320LTexas until 18453
or HIS 320P Texas, 1845-1914
or HIS 320R Texas, 1914 to the Present

For those seeking certification in social studies, grades seven through 12:

RequirementsHours
HIS 301FThe Premodern World3
HIS 309LWestern Civilization in Modern Times3
HIS 315KThe United States, 1492-18653
HIS 315LThe United States since 18653
HIS 320LTexas until 18453
or HIS 320P Texas, 1845-1914
or HIS 320R Texas, 1914 to the Present
GRG 301CThe Natural Environment3
GRG 305This Human World: An Introduction to Geography3
Introduction to Economics Course
PSY 301Introduction to Psychology3

In addition to the above requirements, history majors must take:

RequirementsHours
Any Upper-Division Government Course3
Any Upper-Division Government Course3

For those seeking certification in English, grades four through eight:

RequirementsHours
M 316KFoundations of Arithmetic3
M 316LFoundations of Geometry, Statistics, and Probability3
Six additional hours from Natural Sciences (AST, BIO, CH, GEO, PS, PHY, NTR may not duplicate)6
EDC 339FAdolescent Literacy3
E 360RLiterary Studies for High School Teachers of English3
E 364TThe English Language and Its Social Context3
RHE 360MRhetoric and Writing for Teachers of English3
Multicultural Literature in the American Classroom3
Multicultural Literature in the American Classroom3

For those seeking certification in English, grades seven through 12:

RequirementsHours
EDC 339FAdolescent Literacy3
E 360RLiterary Studies for High School Teachers of English3
E 364TThe English Language and Its Social Context3
RHE 360MRhetoric and Writing for Teachers of English3
Multicultural Literature in the American Classroom3
Multicultural Literature in the American Classroom3

For rhetoric and writing majors seeking certification in English, grades four through eight:

RequirementsHours
EDC 339FAdolescent Literacy3
M 316KFoundations of Arithmetic3
M 316LFoundations of Geometry, Statistics, and Probability3
Six additional hours from Natural Sciences (AST, BIO, CH, GEO, PS, PHY, NTR may not duplicate)6
RHE 309SCritical Reading and Persuasive Writing3
RHE 325MAdvanced Writing3
RHE 360MRhetoric and Writing for Teachers of English3
E 360RLiterary Studies for High School Teachers of English3
E 364TThe English Language and Its Social Context3
Multicultural Literature in the American Classroom3

For rhetoric and writing majors seeking certification in English, grades seven through 12:

RequirementsHours
EDC 339FAdolescent Literacy3
RHE 309SCritical Reading and Persuasive Writing3
RHE 325MAdvanced Writing3
RHE 360MRhetoric and Writing for Teachers of English3
E 360RLiterary Studies for High School Teachers of English3
E 364TThe English Language and Its Social Context3
Multicultural Literature in the American Classroom3

Program in Comparative Literature

The program in comparative literature approaches the study of literature from a variety of viewpoints rather than from the viewpoint of a single language or nation. Courses in literary history, practical criticism, and critical theory stress the relationship between literature and other disciplines in the humanities, the arts, and the social sciences. The program offers both the doctoral and the master’s degree and sponsors courses on both the graduate and the undergraduate level. All comparative literature courses are conducted in English.

To introduce undergraduates to the field of study, the comparative literature faculty has designed a cluster of courses in critical thinking and world literature. These courses concentrate on writing and thinking critically, with a focus on literary texts drawn from around the world, in the context of an interdisciplinary and international program. The 12-hour cluster complements many majors in liberal arts; with the approval of the student’s major department, it may be used to fulfill the minor requirement. More information is available from the comparative literature program.