School of Human Ecology

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester-hour equivalents of University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information is given in Appendix A.

Human Development and Family Sciences: HDF

Lower-Division Courses

HDF 304 (TCCN: TECA 1303). Family Relationships.

Same as Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 4). The process of family interaction over the life cycle. Application of research findings to the understanding of relationships. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 304H, Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 4).

HDF 304H. Family Relationships: Honors.

The process of family interaction over the life cycle. Application of research findings to the understanding of relationships. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 304H, Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 4). Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

HDF 312. Family Resource Management.

Management concepts and theory in resource allocation used to meet family and life demands. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 304.

HDF 313 (TCCN: TECA 1354). Child Development.

Same as Women's and Gender Studies 313. Motor, language, cognitive, social, and emotional development in the family context. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 313H, Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 5), 313. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L, and Psychology 301 with grade of at least C-.

HDF 313H. Child Development: Honors.

Motor, language, social, and emotional development of children in the family context, with an emphasis on research findings and evaluations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 313H, Women's and Gender Studies 301 (Topic 5: Child Development). Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least B-, credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 113L, and consent of the department.

HDF 113L. Child Development Laboratory.

Students observe children at the University Child and Family Laboratory and relate their observations to the issues discussed in Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 313H. One and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 with a grade of at least C- and credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 313 or 313H.

HDF 315L. Research Methods in Human Development and Family Sciences.

Survey of research methods, including observational and experimental techniques. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302); credit or registration for Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 313, 113L.

HDF 119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Human Development and Family Sciences.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the School of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

HDF 322. Personal and Family Finance.

Overview from the individual and family perspectives of financial planning tools, cash management, consumer credit, basic tax preparation, and insurance selection. Includes application of knowledge to hypothetical situations and case studies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

HDF 129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Human Development and Family Sciences.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the School of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

HDF 335. Adult Development.

Adulthood and the development, changes, and maturation that occurs, including the impact of relationships in adulthood. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L.

HDF 337. Personal Relationships.

Studies intimate relationships, including dating, cohabitation, marriage, and gay and lesbian relationships, as well as situational factors that may influence basic relationship processes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Human Development and Family Sciences 304 and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 338. Developmentally Appropriate Practices with Young Children.

Developmentally appropriate practices, the importance of play, arranging environments, material selection, and a basic understanding about centers and activities for young children. Three lecture hours a week for one semester, with an additional three to six hours of fieldwork sometime during the semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L, or Psychology 304.

HDF 340. Ethical, Philosophical, and Professional Development Issues.

Explores ethical and philosophical issues; personal values and choices; professional development and leadership; and career goals, opportunities, and challenges as they relate to human development and family sciences. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

HDF 342. Development of Psychopathology from Infancy through Adolescence.

A developmental approach to the study of emotional and behavioral disorders from infancy through adolescence, including attachment disorders, autism, attention deficit disorder, conduct disorder, phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, eating disorders, and schizophrenia. Also includes contrasting theories of psychopathology, epidemiology and outcomes of childhood disorders, therapeutic approaches and their efficacy, and developmental resilience. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 339, 342, Psychology 339. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L.

HDF 343. Human Development in Minority and Immigrant Families.

Examines the theories of human development and cultural psychology as they apply to the developmental issues of minority and immigrant children and families. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Human Development and Family Sciences 343 and 378K (Topic: Child Development in Minority and Immigrant Families) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 345. Peer Relationships.

Children's peer relationships from toddlerhood to adolescence. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Human Development and Family Sciences 345 and 378K (Topic: Peer Relationships) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 347. Socioeconomic Problems of Families.

An analysis of socioeconomic factors affecting the economic well-being of families and individuals. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and six semester hours of coursework in anthropology, economics, education, human development and family sciences, psychology, social work, or sociology.

HDF 351. Infant Development and Attachment Relationships.

The development of emerging social language and cognitive capacities during infancy and toddlerhood and the development and consequences in infant-caregiver attachment security. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 352. Field Experience: Community.

Practicum in applied settings concerning human development and family sciences. One lecture hour and ten to twelve hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; a University grade point average of at least 2.00; the following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 313, 113L, and 315L, Mathematics 408C or 408N, Psychology 301, and Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302); Human Development and Family Sciences 312 and 340; nine additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences; six semester hours of coursework from the list of approved supporting courses available from the School of Human Ecology; and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences by May 1 for enrollment in the following spring semester, or by December 1 for enrollment in the following fall semester.

HDF 652F. Field Practicum: Community.

Designed for students in their last semester. Practicum in settings concerning human development and family sciences. One lecture hour and at least twenty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; a University grade point average of at least 2.00; the following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 313, 113L, and 315L, Mathematics 408C or 408N, Psychology 301, and Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302); Human Development and Family Sciences 312 and 340; nine additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences; six semester hours of coursework from the list of approved supporting courses available from the School of Human Ecology; and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences by May 1 for enrollment in the following spring semester, or by December 1 for enrollment in the following fall semester.

HDF 352L. Field Experience: Early Childhood.

Study and implementation of skills necessary for planning, guiding, and interacting with young children and their families, and for the management of facilities that provide services for young children. One lecture hour and ten to twelve hours of fieldwork a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; a University grade point average of at least 2.00; the following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 313, 113L, and 315L, Mathematics 408C or 408N, Psychology 301, and Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302); Human Development and Family Sciences 312, 338, 340, and 366; three additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences; six semester hours of coursework from the list of approved supporting courses available from the School of Human Ecology; and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences by May 1 for enrollment in the following spring semester, or by December 1 for enrollment in the following fall semester.

HDF 652P. Field Practicum: Early Childhood.

Designed for students in their last semester. Study and implementation of skills necessary for planning, guiding, and interacting with young children and their families; and for the management of facilities that provide services for young children. One lecture hour and at least twenty laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; a University grade point average of at least 2.00; the following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 313, 113L, and 315L, Mathematics 408C or 408N, Psychology 301, and Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302); Human Development and Family Sciences 312, 338, 340, and 366; three additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences; six semester hours of coursework from the list of approved supporting courses available from the School of Human Ecology; and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences by May 1 for enrollment in the following spring semester, or by December 1 for enrollment in the following fall semester.

HDF 353. Longevity in the 21st Century.

Explores questions concerning the rapidly changing world in which people routinely live into old age. Focus on challenges adults face at the individual, familial, and societal level due to a prolonged adulthood. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Human Development and Family Sciences 353 and 378K (Topic: Longevity in the 21st Century) may not both be counted. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 304 and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 155H, 255H, 355H, 655H. Problems Course: Honors.

Intensive study of selected research problems. For each semester hour of credit earned, at least three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Human Development and Family Sciences 315L with a grade of at least B-; Mathematics 316, Statistics and Data Sciences 303 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 303), 304 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 304), 305 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305), or 306 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 306) with a grade of at least B-; a University grade-point average of at least 3.00; and consent of the department.

HDF 155R, 255R, 355R, 655R. Problems Course: Research Practicum.

Intensive study of selected problems of a transdisciplinary nature. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; a University grade point average of at least 2.00; the following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Human Development and Family Sciences 304, 313, 113L, and 315L; Psychology 301; Mathematics 408C, 408N, or Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302); and consent of instructor. Admission by application only, filed with the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences by May 1 for enrollment in the following spring semester, or by December 1 for enrollment in the following fall semester; or consent of instructor. For nonmajors, the application process and prerequisites may be waived by consent of instructor.

HDF 356. The Evolution of Relationships.

Reviews the scientific literature on the evolution and function of adult romantic relationships. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 304 or 304H.

HDF 358. Parent-Child Relationships.

The determinants of parenting attitudes and behavior and the effects on children of variations in sensitivity, discipline, and other aspects of parenting. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 360. Methods of Family Life Education.

An examination, integrating theory and applied knowledge, of the best practices for working with families. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and Human Development and Family Sciences 304 and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 362. Children and Public Policy.

The positive and negative effects of policy on children and the policy landscape in several major domains of child and family life in the United States and in other countries. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences, anthropology, education, psychology, sociology, or social work.

HDF 466. Guidance in Adult-Child Relationships.

Same as Women's and Gender Studies 466. Theory and implementation of positive child and adult interactions, communication, and guidance strategies. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Development and Family Sciences 466, Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic 4: Guidance in Adult-Child Relationships), 466. Prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L; and three semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences, education, psychology, or sociology.

HDF 371. Adolescent Development in Context.

The biological, cognitive, and social changes that occur during the second decade of life, including the developmental issues faced by adolescents. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each.

HDF 372K. Families in Transition.

Analysis of interaction, transitions, and crises over the family life span. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and the following courses with a grade of at least C- in each: Human Development and Family Sciences 304 or 304H, and 315L and 337.

HDF 378K. Advanced Child and Family Development.

Concepts, theories, and issues in human development and family sciences. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences (or child development), anthropology, education, psychology, sociology, or social work, and consent of instructor.

Topic 5: Media and the Family.
Topic 6: Introduction to Early Childhood Intervention.
Topic 8: Advanced Early Childhood Intervention. Additional prerequisite: Human Development and Family Sciences 378K (Topic 6).

HDF 378L. Theories of Child and Family Development.

Study and analysis of major theories in human and family development. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Human Development and Family Sciences 313, 113L, and 315L with a grade of at least C- in each; and three additional semester hours of upper-division coursework in human development and family sciences with a grade of at least C- in each course.

HDF 379H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Supervised individual research on a special topic in human development and family sciences; oral presentation and preparation of a scholarly paper covering the research. May be based on laboratory, library, or field research. Conference course. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, admission to the human development and family sciences honors program, and consent of the honors adviser. Name of honors adviser and application procedure are available in the division office.

Human Ecology: H E

Lower-Division Courses

H E 115H. Freshman Honors Seminar.

Research presentations by students, faculty, and invited scientists on current issues in human ecology, human development and family sciences, and nutrition. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the honors degree option in human development and family sciences or nutrition; three semester hours of honors-designated coursework in chemistry, biology, or mathematics with a grade of at least B-; and Human Development and Family Sciences 313 and 113L, or Nutrition 312 and 112L, with a grade of at least B- in each course.

Upper-Division Courses

H E 225H. Sophomore Honors Seminar.

Students plan, conduct, write, and present research on a current topic in human ecology. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of honors-designated coursework in chemistry, biology, or mathematics; concurrent enrollment in a course chosen from a list maintained in the departmental office; and consent of instructor and the departmental honors adviser.

H E 355. Problems Course.

Intensive study of selected problems of a transdisciplinary nature. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; additional prerequisites vary with the topic.

Topic 1: Research in Family Economics.

Nutrition: NTR

Lower-Division Courses

NTR 306 (TCCN: BIOL 1322, HECO 1322). Fundamentals of Nutrition.

Essential food components and their functions in life processes. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Nutrition 306, 312, 312H. Nutrition 306 may not be counted toward a nutritional sciences degree.

NTR 307. Introductory Food Science.

Application of the principles of food chemistry to processing and preparation techniques. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For nutrition majors: Nutrition 312 or 312H with a grade of at least C-, and credit or registration for 107L; for others: Nutrition 306, 312, or 312H with a grade of at least C-.

NTR 107L. Introductory Food Science Laboratory.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 307.

NTR 312. Introduction to Nutritional Sciences.

Biochemical, physiological, and cellular functions of energy macronutrients, vitamins and minerals, and the scientific basis for current dietary and nutrient recommendations. Designed for science majors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Nutrition 306, 312, 312H. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301 with a grade of at least C-; credit or registration for Biology 311C and Chemistry 302; and one of the following with a grade of at least C-: Mathematics 408C, 408D, 408N, Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302), 304 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 304), 306 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 306), 325H (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 325H), or 328M (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 328M).

NTR 312H. Introduction to Nutritional Sciences: Honors.

Restricted to honors eligible majors in nutritional sciences, biology, biochemistry, and students in the Dean's Scholars Honors Program. Biochemical, molecular, and cellular functions of nutrients with emphasis on primary scientific literature and current methodology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Nutrition 306, 311, 312, 312H. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each: Chemistry 301 or 301H; and Mathematics 408C or 408n, or the equivalent; and credit or registration for Biology 311C or 315H, and Chemistry 302 or 302H.

NTR 112L. Introduction to Nutritional Science Laboratory.

Collection and evaluation of dietary intake data, nutrient composition of food, and survey of dietetic practice. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 312.

NTR 312R. Research in Nutritional Sciences.

Restricted to honors eligible majors in nutritional sciences, biology, biochemistry, and students in the Dean's Scholars Honors Program. Introduction to biochemical and molecular biological techniques, enzyme and coenzyme assays, dietary analysis and assessment protocols, and statistical methods in nutritional sciences. Preparation of a scholarly paper and oral presentation of research findings. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Nutrition 112L and 312R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each: Chemistry 301 or 301H; and Mathematics 408C or 408N, or the equivalent; and credit or registration for Biology 311C or 315H, Chemistry 302 or 302H, and Nutrition 312H.

NTR 315. Nutrition through the Life Cycle.

Adapting nutrition recommendations to physiological changes throughout the life span. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 306, 312, or 312H with a grade of at least C-.

NTR 316. Culture and Food.

Influence of culture on foodways around the world. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 306, 312, or 312H with a grade of at least C-.

NTR 218. Assessment of Nutritional Status.

Assessment of nutritional status using anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, and dietary intake data, and development and implementation of effective care for individuals. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Nutrition 218 and 318 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Nutrition 312 and 112L, or 312H and 312R with a grade of at least C- in each; and credit or registration for Nutrition 118L.

NTR 118L. Assessment of Nutritional Status Laboratory.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 218.

NTR 119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Nutrition.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the School of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

NTR 321. International Nutrition: The Developing World.

Nutrition-related issues in the developing world, including nutrient deficiency and disease, concerns in vulnerable populations (pregnancy, infancy, childhood, and old age), and food aid. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 306, 312, or 312H with a grade of at least C-.

NTR 324. Advanced Food Science.

Application of the principles of food chemistry to the development of food products. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Chemistry 320M, Nutrition 307, 107L, and 326 with a grade of at least C- in each; and credit or registration for Nutrition 124L.

NTR 124L. Advanced Food Science Laboratory.

Individual research project on food product development and evaluation. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 324.

NTR 326. Intermediate Nutrition and Metabolism.

Integration of nutrition, genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology. Focuses on the cellular and molecular basis of nutrition-related diseases and nutrient-gene interactions. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Biology 311C, and Nutrition 312 or 312H; and credit or registration for Chemistry 320M, and Nutrition 112L or 312R.

NTR 126L. Nutritional Sciences Laboratory.

Basic laboratory techniques in nutritional sciences. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 326.

NTR 129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Nutrition.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the School of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

NTR 330. Nutrition Education and Counseling.

Application of counseling and learning theories to the care of individuals and groups in community and clinical settings. Three lecture hours and one additional class hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 315 and 326 with a grade of at least C- in each.

NTR 331. International Nutrition: Social and Environmental Policies.

Explores the nutritional concerns of different countries, environmental aspects of food supply, and social policies needed to balance supply with demand in a sustainable manner. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nutrition 331 and 360 (Topic: International Nutrition: Social and Environmental Policies) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, and Nutrition 306, 312, or 312H with a grade of at least C-.

NTR 332. Community Nutrition.

National and international issues in public health and nutrition programs. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Nutrition 312 or 312H; 315; and 326.

NTR 334. Foodservice Systems Management.

Procurement, production, and service delivery in foodservice systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: For nutrition majors: Nutrition 307, 107L, and 326 with a grade of at least C- in each, and credit or registration for Nutrition 234L; for others: Nutrition 307 with a grade of at least C-, and one of the following with a grade of at least C-: Nutrition 306, 312, or 312H.

NTR 234L. Laboratory in Foodservice Systems.

Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 334.

NTR 337. Principles of Epidemiology in Nutritional Sciences.

Introduction the role of epidemiology methods as the basis for selection of study design and data collection tools in nutrition research such as dietary tools, biomarkers of diet or disease, and anthropometric measurements like obesity. Emphasis on interpretation of study results in nutrition research. Three lecture hours per week for one semester. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Nutrition 312H or 326, and one of the following with a grade of at least C-: Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302), 304 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 304), 306 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 306), 325H (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 325H), or 328M (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 328M).

NTR 338H. Issues in Nutrition and Health: Honors.

Restricted to honors majors in biology, biochemistry, and nutritional sciences, and students in the Dean's Scholars honors program. Identifying, reading, analyzing, writing, and presenting scientific research on selected subjects in nutrition and human health. Detailed literature review as preparation for an honors research thesis. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nutrition 338H and 338W may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H; Nutrition 312H and 312R; one of the following: Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302), 303 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 303), 304 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 304), 305 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 305), or 325H (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 325H); and credit or registration for Biology 365S and Chemistry 369, or Chemistry 339K and 339L.

NTR 338W. Issues in Nutrition and Health.

Identifying, reading, analyzing, writing, and presenting scientific research on selected topics in nutrition and human health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Nutrition 338H and 338W may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Biochemistry 369 (or Chemistry 369), or Biochemistry 339F (or Chemistry 339K and 339L); Biology 325 and 365S (or 416L); Nutrition 312H or 326; and one of the following with a grade of at least C-: Statistics and Data Sciences 302 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 302), 304 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 304), 306 (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 306), 325H (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 325H), or 328M (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 328M).

NTR 342. Advanced Nutritional Sciences.

Biochemical and molecular biological aspects of carbohydrate, fat, and amino acid metabolism. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C-: Nutrition 326; and Biology 325 or Nutrition 218 and 118L; and credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Biochemistry 369 (or Chemistry 369) and Biology 365S.

NTR 343. Vitamins and Minerals.

Biomedical, cellular and molecular, and clinical aspects of vitamins, minerals, and water. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Nutrition 343, 344, 365 (Topic 1). Prerequisite: Biology 325, 365S (or 416L), and Nutrition 342, with a grade of at least C- in each.

NTR 144M. Advanced Nutrition II Laboratory.

Advanced laboratory techniques in nutrition assessment and research. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Nutrition 344 or consent of instructor.

NTR 245C. Clinical Practice in Medical Nutrition Therapy I.

Application of principles of medical nutrition therapy to the care of clients in the practice setting. Nine hours of supervised practice a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 370 with a grade of at least C-, credit or registration for Nutrition 371, and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

NTR 345M. Clinical Practice in Medical Nutrition Therapy II.

Application of principles of medical nutrition therapy to the care of patients in health care facilities. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for four weeks. Prerequisite: Nutrition 245C and 371 with a grade of at least C- in each. Students must register for Nutrition 372C in the same semester.

NTR 152, 252, 352. Field Experience in Nutrition.

For each semester hour of credit earned, three field placement hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Approval of application for field experience. Applications are available in the department office.

NTR 353. Field Experience in International Nutrition.

Supervised study abroad experience designed to help students understand nutrition science issues, applications, related health care practices in a global environment, and other cultures. Students work in schools, hospitals, or similar settings to gain professional experience with food science and dietetics. Five lecture hours and ten field hours a week for five weeks. Prerequisite: Nutrition 306, 312, or 312H with a grade of at least C-; and approval of an application to study abroad.

NTR 155, 255, 355, 455. Undergraduate Research in Nutrition.

Supervised individual undergraduate research in nutrition. For each semester hour of credit earned, at least three laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit, but no more than four semester hours may be counted toward a degree in nutrition. Any additional hours must be taken on the pass/fail basis. Nutrition 355 and 355H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NTR 355H. Honors Research.

Restricted to honors eligible majors in nutritional sciences, biology, biochemistry, and students in the Dean's Scholars Honors Program. Research in biological, biochemical, or nutritional science, coordinated with readings of scientific literature, and a written research report for each semester in which credit is sought. Nutrition 355 and 355H may not both be counted. May be repeated for credit, but no more than nine semester hours may be counted toward the major in nutrition. Any additional hours must be taken on the pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H; Nutrition 312H and 312R; and approval of research supervisor.

NTR 355M. Advanced Food Systems Management.

Financial control, quality assurance, personnel administration, foodservice equipment, layout and design in foodservice operations. Analysis and evaluation of an organized foodservice operation. Three lecture hours and four hours of supervised practice a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Accounting 310F or 311, and Nutrition 334 and 234L, with a grade of at least C- in each.

NTR 360. Selected Topics in Applied Nutrition.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

NTR 162. Standards, Ethics, and Credentialing for Dietetic Practice.

Identification of standards and discussion of current issues in ethics and credentialing for dietetics practice. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Nutrition 218 and 118L.

NTR 365. Selected Topics in Nutritional Sciences.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 2: Nutrition and Genes. Interactions between nutrients and gene expression, including heredity, gene regulation, metabolic disease, developmental abnormalities, and molecular techniques. Prerequisite: Biology 325, 365S (or 416L), and Nutrition 342, with a grade of at least C- in each.
Topic 4: Obesity and Metabolic Health. Examines the prevalence, prevention, and treatment of adult and childhood obesity, and the metabolic disorders related to obesity. Prerequisite: Biology 365S, and Nutrition 312 or 312H with a grade of at least C-.

NTR 366L. Research Methods in Nutritional Sciences.

Focuses on state-of-the-art research in nutrition, including biochemistry and molecular biological techniques for nutrient-gene interactions, enzyme and coenzyme functions, and nutrient analysis of biologic materials. Includes data analysis and statistical methods. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Nutrition 126L with a grade of at least C-.

NTR 167. Undergraduate Seminar in Nutritional Sciences.

One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

NTR 370. Medical Nutrition Therapy I.

The role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of chronic disease such as diabetes and heart disease. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C-: Nutrition 326; and Biology 325 or Nutrition 218 and 118L; and credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Biochemistry 369 (or Chemistry 369) and Biology 365S (or 416L).

NTR 371. Medical Nutrition Therapy II.

Nutritional care of critically ill patients, including techniques of nutrition support. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C-: Nutrition 326; and Biology 325 or Nutrition 218 and 118L; and credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Biochemistry 369 (or Chemistry 369) and Biology 365S (or credit for 416L).

NTR 372C. Practicum in Clinical Dietetics.

Supervised practice in health care facilities. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for four weeks. Prerequisite: Admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. Students must register for Nutrition 345M in the same semester.

NTR 372F. Practicum in Food Services Systems Management.

Supervised practice in food service facilities. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for four weeks. Prerequisite: Nutrition 245C and 355M with a grade of at least C- in each, and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. Students must register for Nutrition 373S in the same semester.

NTR 373S. Practicum in Dietetic Administration.

Supervised practice in the administration of food and nutrition programs. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for three weeks. Prerequisite: Admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics. Students must register for Nutrition 372F in the same semester.

NTR 374C. Practicum in Community Dietetics.

Supervised practice in one or more community-based nutrition programs. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for five weeks. Prerequisite: Nutrition 345M, 372C, 372F, and 373S with a grade of at least C- in each; and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

NTR 374P. Advanced Practicum in Dietetics.

Culminating experience in the practice of administrative, clinical, or community dietetics. Forty hours of supervised practice a week for five weeks. Prerequisite: Nutrition 345M, 372C, 372F, and 373S with a grade of at least C- in each; and admission to the Coordinated Program in Dietetics.

NTR 379H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Supervised individual research on a special topic in nutrition; oral presentation and preparation of a scholarly paper covering the research. May be based on laboratory, library, or field research. Conference course. May be taken twice for credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the student's research supervisor and the departmental honors adviser.

Public Health: PBH

Lower-Division Courses

PBH 317. Introduction to Public Health.

Overview and basic principles of public health, including the public health system, concepts and tools for measuring health in populations, the relationship between public health and the medical care system, and the role of law and government in public health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 317 and Public Health 317 may not both be counted.

Upper-Division Courses

PBH 320. Topics in Health Informatics and Health Information Technology.

Concepts, theories, and issues in health informatics and health information technology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of C-.

PBH 323. Introduction to Health Informatics.

Introduces theoretical foundations of health informatics, database theory and management, healthcare standards, and medical decision making. Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 337 (Topic: Introduction to Health Informatics), 353, Public Health 323.

PBH 330. Topics in Public Health.

Concepts, theories, and issues in public health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C-.

PBH 334. Global Health.

An investigation of global health issues, including the principles of global health, the burden of morbidity and mortality, health determinants, health care and public health systems, socioeconomic development, and human rights. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Biology 334 and Public Health 334 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Public Health 358D and 368D with a grade of at least C- in each.

PBH 137, 237, 337, 437. Selected Topics in Public Health.

Recent developments and research methods in the field of public health will be explored. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Some topics may require additional hours. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C-.

PBH 338. Environmental Health.

Introduction to the major areas of environmental health presented in the context of epidemiology, toxicology, and health effects. Subjects include water and air quality, solid and liquid waste, hazardous chemicals, radiation, infectious agents, food safety, and occupational health. Three lecture hours a week for one semester; several field trips to be arranged outside of the lecture. Prerequisite: Public Health 358D and 368D with a grade of at least C- in each.

PBH 341R. Public Health Research.

Students conduct public health research, mentored by professionals at public health practice agencies or faculty at graduate schools of public health throughout Texas. An average of twelve hours of fieldwork a week for a total of at least 180 hours. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H with a grade of at least C-; students must also submit a proposal to the instructor.

PBH 354. Epidemiology.

Introduction to basic principles and concepts in epidemiology, including descriptive epidemiology, association and causation, basic epidemiological study design, evidence-based decision analysis, and applications of epidemiology methods to basic and clinical science. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 325 or 325H, and Public Health 317 with a grade of at least C- in each; and credit or registration for Biology 328M or Statistics and Data Sciences 328M (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 328M).

PBH 358D. Health Policy and Health Systems.

Covers the essentials of health policy and law, including the ways that policy and legal issues impact health care and public health systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Health and Society 330, Public Health 358D, Sociology 358D. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each: Public Health 354, and Statistics and Data Sciences 328M (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 328M).

PBH 361P. Public Health Internship.

Includes a public health research project off campus at a public health practice agency or a graduate school of public health. The equivalent of twelve lecture hours a week for one semester, with additional hours to be arranged. Public Heath 361P and Biology 361P may not both be counted. May be repeated once for credit. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the letter-grade basis only. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least B- in each: Biology 226L, and Biology 326M or 326R; and completion of an internship application, available online at the Public Health page.

PBH 368D. Social Context of Public Health.

Introduction to the social and behavioral theories that inform the discipline of public health, including practical examples of the ways that these theories are used to understand health-related behaviors and health promotion. Includes data on population distributions of mortality and morbidity, health inequalities, and how underlying social structures impact the health of individuals and communities. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Public Health 368D and Sociology 368D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: The following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each: Public Health 354, and Statistics and Data Sciences 328M (or Statistics and Scientific Computation 328M).

PBH 379H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Supervised individual research on a special topic in public health, leading to an honors thesis and an oral presentation. May be based on laboratory, library, or field research. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated once for credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; a university grade point average of at least 3.0; admission to the public health honors program; and consent of the honors adviser.

Textiles and Apparel: TXA

Lower-Division Courses

TXA 301. Clothing the Planet.

Study of the role textiles and apparel play in human lives. Introduction to the textile and apparel industries, and the broad perspective and core skill sets that characterize the field. Subjects include terminology, fibers and fabrics, textile technology, product development through fashion design and retail merchandising, global sourcing and manufacturing, international promotion and marketing, and textile conservation, exhibition, and collection management. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

TXA 103, 203, 303. Topics in Textiles and Apparel.

For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

TXA 205. Textiles.

Chemical and physical properties of fibers and yarns, fabric construction, and finishes. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 105L.

TXA 105L. Textiles Laboratory.

Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 205.

TXA 212K. Apparel Industry.

Introduction to the integrated apparel design industry from the creative and merchandising perspective. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Textiles and Apparel 212L; and the following coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course: Textiles and Apparel 316L or 316Q; and 319, or 219C and 119L.

TXA 212L. Apparel Product Development and Design Laboratory.

Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 212K.

TXA 313. Aesthetics: Theory and Practice.

Introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of the principles of design and visual literacy in the field of textiles and apparel. Introduction to the principles and theories that define what is aesthetically pleasing and the vocabulary necessary to identity, describe, and critique them. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

TXA 214K. Product Development.

Introduction to all stages of product development involved in fashion and functional design. Emphasis on target market identification, cost analysis, material selection, and the organization of product development within the industry structure. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration for Textiles and Apparel 214L.

TXA 214L. Product Development Laboratory.

Application of product development skills and strategies involved in fashion and functional design. Emphasis on target market identification, cost analysis, material selection, and the position of product development within the industry structure. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration for Textiles and Apparel 214K.

TXA 316L. Apparel I.

Industrial techniques of pattern design and garment construction. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Textiles and Apparel 319, or 219C and 119L.

TXA 316Q. Sewn Products Analysis.

Evaluation of soft goods, including materials, quality of work, and costs. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C- in each.

TXA 219C. Applied Art in Visual Presentation.

Applied principles and elements of design as related to merchandise presentation, visual display, store layout, and space planning. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Students with credit for Textiles and Apparel 319 may not earn credit for Textiles and Apparel 219C or 119L. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 313 with a grade of at least C-.

TXA 119L. Applied Art in Visual Presentation Laboratory.

Application of the principles and elements of design as related to merchandise presentation, display planning, execution, and coordination. Three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Students with credit for Textiles and Apparel 319 may not earn credit for Textiles and Apparel 119L. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Textiles and Apparel 219C.

TXA 119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Textiles and Apparel.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the School of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

TXA 325K. Culture, Gender, and Appearance.

Social, economic, aesthetic, and political aspects of historic costume and of the evolution of modern dress. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 219C and 119L with a grade of at least C- in each, or Art History 301.

TXA 325L. History of Dress and Cultural Change I.

Social, economic, aesthetic, and political aspects of costume evolution from ancient times through the Renaissance. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Textiles and Apparel 325K and 325L may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

TXA 325M. History of Dress and Cultural Change II.

Social, economic, aesthetic, and political aspects of costume evolution from the Baroque period through modern times. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Textiles and Apparel 325K and 325M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

TXA 126. Apparel II.

Advanced apparel construction techniques using industry standards and portfolio development. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 316L with a grade of at least C- and credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 226L.

TXA 226L. Apparel II Laboratory.

Advanced apparel construction techniques using industry standards and portfolio development. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 126.

TXA 327. Clothing and Human Behavior.

The social, psychological, and nonverbal significance of clothing and the influence of clothing on behavior. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Three semester hours of coursework in psychology, sociology, or the School of Human Ecology.

TXA 328. Research Methods in Textiles and Apparel.

Basic research methodology and academic writing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, completion of an introductory statistics course, and Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C- in each.

TXA 129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Textiles and Apparel.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the School of Human Ecology. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

TXA 331. Textiles and Apparel in a Global Market.

Overview of the textiles and apparel industry including apparel industry standards, labor costs, economics, distribution, and structure in the modern global marketplace. Subjects include the analysis of consumption patterns and retailing systems to inform product development; exploring cross-cultural comparisons between global consumer markets; understanding importing and exporting systems and other procedures involved in modern supply chain activities; and grasping the collaborative nature of innovation and design, manufacturing and distribution, retailing, and customer satisfaction leading to sales in the global market. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

TXA 350. Advanced Apparel Design Portfolio.

Extensive sociological, cultural, and historic visual research for apparel design. Through a range of projects that incorporate computer-aided design, product illustration, technical packets, proposed production plans, and target market identification, students will produce a professional level, hard copy and online, portfolio that will help prepare them for a career in the apparel industry. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Textiles and Apparel 164K (Topic 1) and 264L (Topic 1); and admission to the Apparel Design Internship Program.

TXA 151. Pre-Internship Seminar.

Preparation course for students seeking internships. Subjects include application, internship interview process, effective professional communication, ethical decision making, leadership development, site expectations, and the impact of business environments on personal and career effectiveness in the field of textiles and apparel. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, Textiles and Apparel 301, 205, 105L, 214K, 214L, 316Q, 219C, 119L, and 376.

TXA 352C, 652C. Field Experience in Textile Conservation.

Participation in an approved internship after completion of all conservation science stream coursework. Students will be placed in an appropriate site under the supervision of an available professional such that students may experience collection management, artifact storage and conservation, exhibit planning/installation, environmental monitoring, and/or other museum or conservation activities. A formal agreement between the faculty supervisor and internship sponsor will govern activities and be monitored throughout the experience through assignments, regular electronic communication, and a site visit. For Textiles and Apparel 352C, a minimum of 150 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. For Textiles and Apparel 652C, a minimum of 225 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and Admission to the Conservation Certificate Program, or Textiles and Apparel 219C, 119L, 354C, 354D, 354E, 354F, and 355D, and admission to the Conservation Internship Program for Conservation Science, Option IV major.

TXA 352D. Field Experience in Apparel Design.

Application of apparel design techniques and principles in a professional environment. At least 154 hours of fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Apparel Design Internship Program, and Textiles and Apparel 164K (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) and 264L (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) with a grade of at least C- in each.

TXA 352M. Field Experience in Retail Merchandising.

Application of merchandising techniques and principles in a professional environment. At least 154 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Retail Merchandising Internship Program.

TXA 353. Field Experience I.

Application of merchandising strategic planning in a professional environment with faculty and site director supervision. At least 150 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. Textiles and Apparel 315K and Textiles and Apparel 353 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Admission to the Retail Merchandising Internship Program.

TXA 354C. Material Properties and Deterioration.

Overview of the major mechanisms of textile deterioration from a variety of sources including light, dirt, various insects and microorganisms, as well as mechanical wear and tear. Examination of the peculiarities of these deterioration phenomena through the study of the basic chemical and physical properties of the fibers constituting the textiles. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 354E with a grade of C- or better.

TXA 354D. Instrumental Methods for Conservation Assessment.

Overview of primary instrumental methods for evaluating historical textiles in terms of physical characteristics, chemical content, strength loss, structural deterioration, color change, and overall structural integrity and status of impact of environmental factors. Focus on instrumental features, measuring procedures, and interpretation of instrumental data. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 354E with a grade of at least C-.

TXA 354E. Conservation Planning and Preventive Treatments.

Implementation and management of textile conservation. Subjects include general requirements for preserving historical textiles, procedures for planning textile conservation projects, and major physical and chemical methods of preventive and postdamage treatments for historical textiles. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Chemistry 320M, Textiles and Apparel 260L, and 260M.

TXA 354F. Advanced Exhibit Planning and Installation.

Planning and implementation of a full museum exhibit including budget, selection and preparation of artifacts, prop construction, signage, educational and promotional materials, donor/supporter communication, and opening event. Serves as a pre-internship/capstone course for conservation science majors. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 325L, 325M, and 355D.

TXA 155, 355. Problems Course.

Intensive study of selected problems of an interdisciplinary nature. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

TXA 355C. Computer-Aided Design for Apparel.

Computer technology used to create textile prints, weaves, illustrations, flat patterns, promotional pieces, and pattern markers. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C- in each; and credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Textiles and Apparel 164K (Topic 1: Flat Pattern) and 264L (Topic 1: Flat Pattern).

TXA 355D. Textiles Artifact Management and Conservation.

Principles and techniques in the identification, documentation, conservation, and exhibition of textile-based artifacts. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 325M.

TXA 355K. Textile and Apparel Economics.

Economic and regulatory aspects of the textile and apparel industries. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L with a grade of at least C- in each, and Economics 304K and 304L with a grade of at least C- in each.

TXA 355N. History of Textiles.

Role of textiles in the social, economic, aesthetic, and technological development of society; including production and design of textiles throughout history. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L and three semester hours of coursework in art history, with a grade of at least C- in each course.

TXA 355P. Problems in Retail Merchandising.

Intensive study of selected problems related to field experience; development of analytical and problem-solving skills for retailing. At least 154 hours of supervised fieldwork for one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the Retail Merchandising Internship Program.

TXA 359H. Honors Reading Course.

Supervised individual reading on special subjects. Conference course. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

TXA 260L. Advanced Textiles.

Composition, structure, and properties of textile products; contributions of textile research. Two lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 205 and 105L; Chemistry 301, 302, and 204; six semester hours of upper-division coursework in textiles and apparel with a grade of at least C- in each course; and credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for Textiles and Apparel 260M.

TXA 260M. Advanced Textiles Laboratory.

Analysis and evaluation of textile performance. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Textiles and Apparel 260L.

TXA 361. Consumer Behavior in the Marketplace.

Internal and external factors that influence consumer behavior in the marketplace. Application of concepts and theories from the social sciences to the areas of textiles, clothing, and appearance; experience in conducting market and consumer research. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Human Ecology 361 and Textiles and Apparel 361 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and three semester hours of coursework in economics.

TXA 164K. Advanced Problems in Clothing.

Creative application of flat pattern or draping processes. One lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Textiles and Apparel 212K, 212L, 316L, 126, and 226L, with a grade of at least C- in each; and credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for the same topic of Textiles and Apparel 264L.

Topic 1: Flat Pattern.
Topic 2: Draping.
Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design.

TXA 264L. Advanced Problems in Apparel Laboratory.

Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Credit with a grade of at least C- or registration for the same topic of Textiles and Apparel 164K.

Topic 1: Flat Pattern.
Topic 2: Draping.
Topic 3: Advanced Apparel Design.

TXA 165, 265, 365. Advanced Topics in Textiles and Apparel.

For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Additional prerequisites vary with the topic.

TXA 376. Principles of Retail Merchandising.

Retail strategic planning and implementation for soft goods and apparel. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Marketing 320F and six semester hours of upper-division coursework in textiles and apparel, business, studio art, or journalism.

TXA 377. Merchandising Systems.

Application course focusing on the calculation and analysis of the selling price, profitability, assortment planning, purchasing, and inventory control. Includes spreadsheet application and exercises. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Textiles and Apparel 301, 205, 105L, 214K, 214L, 316Q, 219C, 119L, 151, and 376; and admission to the Retail Merchandising Internship Program.

TXA 378H. Honors Seminar in Textiles and Apparel.

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, a University grade point average of at least 3.00, and consent of the honors adviser.

TXA 379H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Supervised individual research on a special topic in textiles and apparel; oral presentation and preparation of a scholarly paper covering the research. May be based on laboratory, library, or field research. Conference course. May be taken twice for credit. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, admission to the Textiles and Apparel Honors Program, Textiles and Apparel 359H with a grade of at least B-, and consent of the honors adviser.