General Information

Mission

The purpose of the School of Nursing is to achieve excellence in undergraduate and graduate education, research, public service, and to advance the missions of the University of Texas at Austin through:

  1. Preparing students at the baccalaureate level to assume roles in professional nursing practice.
  2. Preparing students at the graduate level to assume leadership in practice, education, and research.
  3. Promoting excellence in nursing scholarship.
  4. Advancing the health of the public through developing and disseminating new knowledge about health, health care, and health care delivery through scholarly inquiry.
  5. Providing consultation, health care programs, and health care services in response to emerging and urgent public health needs.

History

The University of Texas School of Nursing, established in Galveston in 1890 as the John Sealy Hospital Training School for Nurses, is one of the oldest schools of nursing in the Southwest. In 1896 it was transferred to the University of Texas and became the School of Nursing, a division of the Medical Branch, with the diploma granted by the University. In addition to the diploma course, a curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing was established in 1923 in cooperation with the College of Arts and Sciences of the Main University in Austin. In 1932 the School of Nursing was renamed the John Sealy College of Nursing. The degree program was transferred to the college in 1943.

With the financial support of the Texas Graduate Nursing Association, graduate courses in nursing were first offered in 1930 in the Department of Physical and Health Education at the Main University. In 1940, a complete curriculum was established leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. In 1945, the curriculum was transferred to the Medical Branch administration, bringing the John Sealy College of Nursing and the new Department of Nursing Education together to form the School of Nursing with its own dean. In 1949, a curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing was established for graduates of diploma programs. The last class of students enrolled in the diploma program was admitted to the School of Nursing in 1957; since that time the school has offered a single program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing.

Funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation provided for a program leading to the Master of Science in Nursing with a major in nursing administration, first offered in 1952. Participating in the program of the Southern Regional Education Board for graduate education in nursing, the School of Nursing offered additional specialization in 1955. At that time the name of the school was changed to the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing.

In the fall of 1960, the University of Texas at Austin became an extension campus of the School of Nursing, which was still located in Galveston, and nursing courses were offered on the Austin campus for the first time. The School of Nursing was reorganized in 1967 as The University of Texas Nursing School (System-wide) and administrative offices were moved to Austin. The school was renamed The University of Texas System School of Nursing in 1972. Junior- and senior-level nursing courses were offered in Austin, El Paso, Fort Worth, Galveston, Houston, and San Antonio.

On March 26, 1976, the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System voted to reorganize the schools of nursing in the system and to place each school under the administration of the president of the health science center or academic institution nearest it. On September 1, 1976, the School of Nursing at Austin became a part of the University of Texas at Austin.

A program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in nursing was initiated in 1974. Nursing faculty members conduct research on a wide variety of topics. Since 2002, the School of Nursing has been ranked among the top institutions in research funding received from the National Institutes of Health.

Facilities

The 110,008-square-foot, five-story Nursing School building houses administrative, faculty, staff, and research offices, as well as large and small classrooms and seminar and conference rooms. Also located in the building are the Cain Center for Nursing Research, the St. David's Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research in Underserved Populations, and the School of Nursing Learning Enhancement and Academic Progression Center, with an audiovisual library and a staff who provide technical assistance for clinical simulation and skills, instructional design, and production.

Learning experiences in the health field are numerous and varied. The School of Nursing has ongoing clinical placement agreements with more than two hundred agencies. These include the Austin State Hospital, University Medical Center at Brackenridge, St. David’s Medical Center, and Seton Medical Center Austin. Other community settings used for student field experiences include nursing homes, neighborhood health centers, day-care centers, state and local health departments, physicians’ offices, and clinics, including our Family Wellness Center, and our Children's Wellness Center (located in Del Valle).

Financial Assistance Available through the School

Application forms for scholarships are available from the Office of Financial Aid and from the School of Nursing, 1710 Red River Street, Austin TX 78701-1499. The School of Nursing Scholarship Committee selects the recipients for endowed nursing scholarships. A list of endowed scholarships can be found on the School of Nursing website. Other scholarships are frequently available through the generosity of groups such as the University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing Alumni Network, area civic organizations, and several nursing student organizations. Information is available in the Office of Student Services each semester.

Other Financial Aid Programs 

ROTC Nursing Scholarships

To be eligible for an ROTC scholarship, an applicant must be a United States citizen and must be less than 25 years old on June 30 of the calendar year during which commissioning is scheduled.

Air Force ROTC Nursing Scholarships. These scholarships provide for payment of tuition and fees and for textbooks and a monthly allowance during the school year. For additional information, contact The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Air Force Science, 1 University Station C3600, Austin TX 78712.

Army ROTC Nursing Scholarships. These scholarships provide for payment of tuition and fees, a flat rate for textbooks, and a monthly allowance during the school year. Students must attend the Nursing Advanced Camp during the summer between the junior and senior years and work individually with a licensed BSN preceptor. Students may apply to the dean for independent study credit; applications are considered on a case-by-case basis. For additional information, contact The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Military Science, 1 University Station C3606, Austin TX 78712.

Navy ROTC Nursing Scholarships. These scholarships provide for payment of tuition and fees and for textbooks and a monthly allowance during the school year. For additional information, contact The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Naval Science, 1 University Station C3604, Austin TX 78712.

Vocational Rehabilitation

The Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) offers assistance in payment of tuition to students who have certain disabling conditions, provided their vocational objectives are approved by a DARS counselor. Services are also available to help students with disabilities find or keep employment. More information is available at http://www.dars.state.tx.us/drs/vr.shtml.

Academic Advising

All nursing students must come to the School of Nursing before registration each semester for academic advising. Individualized academic advising is managed by the academic advisers in the Office of Student Services. In addition, group advising is offered to assist students with clinical schedules and particular requirements of the upcoming semester.

Student Organizations

Undergraduate students interested in nursing are eligible for membership in The University of Texas Nursing Students Association. Through the association, nursing students are represented on campus committees and in campus activities involving all students. The local association is affiliated with the Texas Nursing Students’ Association and the National Student Nurse Association. In addition, students can join the Longhorn Association for Men in Nursing, the African American Nursing Students Association, the Hispanic Nursing Students Association, and the Student Community of Asian Nurses.

Qualified students in the School of Nursing are also eligible for membership in Epsilon Theta Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing.