Minor and Certificate Programs

In the College of Natural Sciences, only one transcript-recognized minor or transcript-recognized certificate may be declared per major.

A student who wishes to pursue more than one transcript-recognized minor or transcript-recognized certificate per major must consult with his or her academic adviser to get permission from the College. When considering whether to grant an exception and allow pursuit of another transcript-recognized credential, the academic adviser will take into account the student's long-term education/professional goals and the student's ability to graduate within four years of entering the university.

Students admitted to transcript-recognized certificate and transcript-recognized minor programs must contact their academic advisers to have approved programs added to their degree audit profiles. This allows progress toward the programs to be tracked and ensures that certificates and minors are added to official transcripts upon graduation, if all requirements are met.

Minor

The transcript-recognized undergraduate academic minor must be completed in conjunction with an undergraduate degree at The University of Texas at Austin. For more information regarding the requirements for achieving a minor, including a comprehensive list of minors, please visit the Minors and Certificate Programs section of the Undergraduate Catalog.

Certificate Programs

Undergraduate certificate programs encourage students to explore academic areas that support and extend their degree plans. The following certificates require at least 18 semester hours of coursework, some of which may also be used to fulfill degree requirements. Undergraduates who complete the certificate requirements in conjunction with their degree requirements or within one year after earning the degree will receive a certificate and recognition on their University transcript. A maximum of nine hours in the certificate program may be taken after completion of the undergraduate degree. At least half of the required coursework in the certificate program must be completed in residence at the University.

Applied Statistical Modeling Certificate

The certificate in Applied Statistical Modeling equips undergraduate students with the tools necessary to understand how to apply statistics to their primary field of study. This certificate program is designed to complement diverse degree programs and to appeal to students across the University in engineering, science, economics, mathematics, and many other disciplines. Certificate students will complete one course in the mathematical foundations of statistics, a two-course sequence in applied statistics, and nine additional hours in statistics, machine learning, econometrics, and other relevant courses from the approved list below.

Admission to the certificate is by application only. Students may download an application from the Department of Statistics and Data Sciences webpage. Students seeking the certificate must also complete the prerequisite course Mathematics 408C408L408N408R, or 408S with a grade of at least C-.

The certificate consists of 18 hours. Students must receive a grade of at least C in each course applied toward the certificate and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 in the courses presented to fulfill the certificate. Courses that appear in multiple approved course lists may be used to satisfy only one requirement. Students must contact the Department of Statistics and Data Sciences to apply for the certificate in the semester in which they are completing the requirements and graduating.

RequirementsHours
Mathematical foundation of statistics3
Probability and Random Processes
Probability I
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Sequence in applied statistics6
Choose one of the following:
Economic Statistics
Introduction to Statistics
Applied Statistics
Statistics and Research Design
Introduction to Social Statistics
Elementary Business Statistics
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
Statistics in Health Care
Statistics in Market Analysis
Biostatistics
And one of the following:
Introduction to Econometrics
Applied Regression and Time Series
Statistics and Modeling
Statistics and Modeling: Honors
Statistics and Modeling for Finance
Honors Statistics
Statistical Models for the Health and Behavioral Sciences
Statistical Methods
Special Topics in Statistics (Topic 1: Applied Regression Analysis)
Nine hours of coursework out of the following: 19
Advertising Research
Artificial Intelligence
Communication Research Methods
Introductory Game Theory
Computational Methods
Seismic Data Processing
Foundations of Epidemiology
Evaluation and Research Design
Measurement in Kinesiology
Probability Models with Actuarial Applications
Actuarial Statistical Estimates
Introduction to Stochastic Processes
Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
Epidemiology
Applied Reservoir Characterization
Advanced Statistics
Statistical Learning and Inference
Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
Advanced Multivariate Modeling
Special Topics in Statistics
Visualization and Data Analysis for Science and Engineering
Special Topics in Scientific Computation
Undergraduate Research
Topics in Statistics (Topic 5: Financial and Econometric Time Series Modeling)
Please Note:
Statistics and Data Sciences 358 (Topic 1: Applied Regression Analysis) may only be counted toward one requirement.
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1. Students are encouraged to select courses within their own majors or colleges as appropriate. The Statistics and Data Sciences courses listed are available to students in all majors.

Computational Science and Engineering Certificate

The Computational Science and Engineering Certificate program is sponsored by the Cockrell School of Engineering, the Jackson School of Geosciences, the College of Liberal Arts, and the College of Natural Sciences; it is administered by the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES). Information regarding the specific requirements of the Certificate can be found in the Cockrell School of Engineering's Minor and Certificates section of the Undergraduate Catalog.

The Elements of Computing Program Certificate

The Elements of Computing Program, administered by the Department of Computer Science, is designed to support computational work in disciplines other than computer science and to provide students with skills in the use of computer applications. Any non-computer science major may take any elements of computing course for which he or she meets the prerequisite. No application process is required.

To earn the Elements of Computing Certificate, students must complete 18 semester hours of coursework with a grade of at least C- in each course.

The following coursework is required:

RequirementsHours
C S 303EElements of Computers and Programming (or the equivalent)3
C S 313EElements of Software Design (or the equivalent)3
Four of the following courses:12
Topics in Computer Science for Nonmajors
Elements of Graphics and Visualization
Elements of Networking
Elements of Databases
Topics in Elements of Computing
Advanced Topics in Elements of Computing
Please Note:
With the approval of the certificate program faculty committee, other appropriate courses may be counted toward the elective requirement.

Evidence and Inquiry Certificate

The Evidence and Inquiry Certificate, pursued by students in the Polymathic Scholars Program and open by application to others, allows students to design an area of study shaped by questions that require evidence and methodologies outside their major. Students work with faculty to identify interests, map them onto academic disciplines at the University, and determine questions related to those interests that might be answerable by research that combines expertise from at least two disciplines. Students describe their area of study, identify primary questions, name two University of Texas at Austin faculty members with research experience relevant to their field, and justify the courses they would take in a written proposal that must be reviewed by three members of the program's faculty steering committee. Students complete an original research thesis in their final year. Those who plan to pursue the certificate must apply no later than the end of their third long semester. More information about the Evidence and Inquiry Certificate is available on the College of Natural Sciences website.

The certificate program requires 22 semester hours of coursework, including at least 11 hours completed in residence. Students must meet the following requirements:

RequirementsHours
UGS 303First-Year Signature Course ((Topic: Originality in the Arts and Sciences) or another critical thinking or research methods substitute course for students who apply for admission after completing a signature course.)3
NSC 109Topics in Natural Science (Topic 4: Polymathic Capstone Field Invention)1
Four additional courses, including at least six semester hours of upper-division coursework, from the student's approved evidence and inquiry area of study12
Senior Capstone Sequence6
Natural Sciences Topics (Topic 1: Polymathic Capstone Thesis Preparation Seminar)
Capstone Thesis Seminar

In the College of Natural Sciences, the Evidence and Inquiry Certificate may be used to complement any major. Some certificate courses will also fulfill degree requirements established by the student's major department and are given later in this section; however, some of the 22 hours required for the certificate may be in addition to the number of hours required for the degree.

Food and Society Certificate

Though food-related issues vary widely in focus, they are all linked by their complexity and are deeply interdisciplinary nature, each relating to topics of health and nutrition, genetics, politics, culture, the environment, economics, and business. Students will be able to appreciate the full range of these interdisciplinary ties and apply new perspectives to their primary academic majors and careers.

Students completing the certificate will be able to apply a more comprehensive understanding of the implications of their food-related actions and decisions; find better solutions to today's complex problems; formulate more effective public policy; become better informed and active citizens; and make healthier choices for themselves and their families.

No admission to the certificate is required. Students must contact the advising office in the School of Human Ecology to apply for the certificate the semester before the certificate requirements are met. The certificate consists of 18 hours, of which nine hours must be in upper-division coursework. Courses must be completed with minimum grades of at least C- unless the course is offered only on the pass/fail basis. Students also seeking the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition may count a maximum of six hours in nutrition toward the food and society certificate.

Some of the courses may contain prerequisites that are in addition to the coursework for the certificate.

RequirementsHours
Three hours of introductory nutrition chosen from the following:3
Fundamentals of Nutrition
Introduction to Nutritional Sciences
Introduction to Nutritional Sciences: Honors
Fifteen hours selected from a minimum of two themes chosen from table 1, 2 and 3 below. 115
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1. No more than nine hours in a single theme may be applied toward the certificate.

1. Nutrition and Health

RequirementsHours
NTR 218
NTR 118L
Assessment of Nutritional Status
and Assessment of Nutritional Status Laboratory
3
NTR 307Introductory Food Science3
NTR 315Nutrition through the Life Cycle3
NTR 330Nutrition Education and Counseling3
NTR 321International Nutrition: The Developing World3
NTR 334Foodservice Systems Management3
NTR 353Field Experience in International Nutrition3
NTR 365Selected Topics in Nutritional Sciences (Topic 4: Obesity and Metabolic Health)3
SOC 308SIntroduction to Health and Society3
N 309Global Health3

2. ​Culture and History

RequirementsHours
NTR 316Culture and Food3
AMS 370Seminar in American Culture (Topic 26: American Food)3
ANT 307Culture and Communication3
ANS 379Capstone Seminars in Asian Studies (Topic 7: Cuisine and Culture in Asia)3
C C 340Advanced Topics in Classical Archaeology (Topic 6: Food, Health, and Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean)3
C C 348Topics in Ancient Civilization (Topic 14: Ancient Greek Medicine)3

3. Politics, Economics, and Environment

RequirementsHours
NTR 331International Nutrition: Social and Environmental Policies3
NTR 332Community Nutrition3
GRG 331KNature, Society, and Adaptation3
GRG 344KGlobal Food, Farming, and Hunger3
GRG 339KEnvironment, Development, and Food Production3
GOV 370LTopics in American Government and Politics (Topic 21: Politics of Food in America)3
MNS 308Humans and a Changing Ocean3
MNS 367KHuman Exploration and Exploitation of the Sea3

Forensic Science Certificate

The Forensic Science Certificate provides an interdisciplinary perspective for students interested in careers in forensic science.

Students seeking employment in forensic science laboratories upon graduation are encouraged to select biology and chemistry courses. Some of these courses may require introductory biology and chemistry courses as prerequisites.

Students must apply online for admission to the certificate through the university-wide portal for transcript-recognized certificates as soon as they decide to pursue the certificate. The certificate consists of 18 hours, including six upper-division hours, with grades of at least C-:

RequirementsHours
ANT 301Biological Anthropology3
Six hours chosen from any of the following courses relevant to forensic science:6
Criminalistics:
Introduction to the Study of Society
Criminology
Sociology of Criminal Justice
Social Psychology and the Law
Behavioral Science:
Introduction to Psychology
Biopsychology
Social Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Pharmacology:
Principles of Drug Action
Forensic Science:
Anatomy and Biology of the Human Skeleton
Nine hours chosen from any of the following areas: 9
Anatomy and Physiology:
Primate Anatomy
The Human Body
Human Systems Physiology
Human Microscopic and Gross Anatomy
Comparative Animal Physiology
Human Systems Physiology Laboratory
Experimental Physiology
Chemistry:
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry
Genetics and Microbiology:
Human Variation
Anthropological Genetics
Genetics
Laboratory Experience in Genetics
Human Genetics
General Microbiology Laboratory
General Microbiology
Statistics and Computation (One course chosen from the following):
Principles of Computational Biology
Elementary Statistical Methods
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
Statistics in Health Care
Statistics in Market Analysis
Biostatistics
Additional coursework from the criminalistics, behavioral science and forensic science sections above. 1
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1. A course may not count toward both the six-hour requirement and the 9-hour requirement

Marine Science Certificate

The Marine Science transcript-recognized certificate enables students to explore the field of marine science. The certificate provides a foundation of basic competency in the fundamentals of marine science, along with specialized upper-division coursework in aquatic science. The knowledge of aquatic science that students gain through the certificate will help them to be competitive for employment or graduate study in this field.

The certificate consists of a minimum of 19 hours with grades of at least C-. Most of the courses in the certificate contain prerequisites of one year of general biology and one year of general chemistry.

Marine and Freshwater Biology and Marine and Freshwater Science majors are not eligible to earn the certificate. Environmental Science majors may count no more than nine hours of degree requirements toward the Marine Science certificate.

RequirementsHours
MNS 310Fundamentals of Marine Science3
MNS 320Marine Ecology3
MNS 120LLaboratory Studies in Marine Ecology1
Three hours chosen from: 3
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Advanced Introduction to Genetics: Honors
Principles of Chemistry I
Principles of Chemistry I: Honors
Principles of Chemistry II
Principles of Chemistry II: Honors
Nine hours from the following, including at least six hours at the Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas:9
Limnology and Oceanography
Principles of Marine Science: Laboratory Studies
Principles of Marine Science: Laboratory Studies
Principles of Marine Science: Undergraduate Seminar
Principles of Marine Science: Undergraduate Seminar
Principles of Marine Science: Special Topics
Principles of Marine Science: Special Topics
Training Cruise(s) (Topic 1: Training Cruise(s): Research in Biological Oceanography )
Principles of Marine Science
Estuarine Ecology
Marine Botany
Marine Conservation Biology
Topics in Marine Science
Marine Invertebrates
Biology of Fishes
Aquatic Microbiology
Marine Chemistry
Marine Environmental Science
Biological Oceanography
Biology of Sharks, Skates, and Rays
Physiology of Fishes
Ecosystem Oceanography
Marine Phytoplankton Diversity
Human Exploration and Exploitation of the Sea
Special Studies in Marine Science
Special Studies in Marine Science
Special Studies in Marine Science

Pre-Health Professions Certificate

The Pre-Health Professions Certificate assists students in preparing for post-baccalaureate, healthcare professional programs. The certificate consists of a minimum of 18 hours, including nine hours in residence. Each course presented for the certificate must be completed with a grade of at least C-.

The certificate is composed of two separate tracks:  a track for majors in the College of Natural Sciences, and a track for majors in other colleges across the university. Students must apply online for admission to the certificate through the university-wide portal for transcript recognized certificates.

Students are encouraged to work closely with the Health Professions Office to select healthcare themes relevant to their professional career goals. Some of the courses may contain prerequisites that are in addition to the coursework for the certificate.

Majors in the College of Natural Sciences must seek the Science Major Track.

Majors outside of the College of Natural Sciences must seek the Non-Science Major Track. The composition of the non-science major track is science coursework necessary for admission to post-baccalaureate, healthcare professional programs. Non-science majors may apply to the certificate program upon completion of the following courses with grades of at least B-Chemistry 301 or 302, and one of the following: Statistics and Data Sciences 302Mathematics 408C408K, 408N, or 408R. Upon admission, the ability to progress in the certificate is dependent on completion of the certificate courses with satisfactory grades.

Science Major Track

RequirementsHours
Complete 18 hours chosen from the following themes relevant to healthcare. 18
Cultural Awareness:
Introduction to Asian American Studies
Introductory Topics in Asian American Studies (Topic 1: Psychological Perspectives on Asian American Identity)
African American Culture
Advanced Topics in Black United States Studies (Topic 11: Psychology of the African American Experience)
Seminar in American Culture (Topic 49: Twentieth-Century United States Lesbian and Gay History)
Perspectives on Deafness
Topics in Latin American Anthropology (Topic 16: Mexican Immigration Cultural History)
Introduction to Mexican American Cultural Studies
Introduction to the Middle East: Adjustment and Change in Modern Times
Health and Anatomy:
Art, Art History, and Medicine
Introduction to Medical and Scientific Terminology
Introduction to Communication Disorders
Human Sexuality
Human Sexuality
Psychology of Sex
Theories of Substance Use and Abuse
Foundations of Epidemiology
Studies in Health: Topical Studies
Topical Seminar in Health Promotion
Evaluation and Research Design
Applied Biomechanics of Human Movement
Applied Human Anatomy
Physiology of Exercise
Biomechanical Analysis of Movement
Introduction to Psychology
Biopsychology
Hormones and Behavior
Selected Topics in Psychology (Topic 4: Health Psychology)
Psychopharmacology
Healthcare Policy:
Communication Ethics
Global Food, Farming, and Hunger
Topics in Environmental Geography (Topic 1: Children's Environmental Health)
Topics in Geography (Topic 9: Human Health and the Environment)
Medical Geography
Peer Health Leadership I
Undergraduate Seminar in United States History (Topic 18: Women in Sickness and Health)
Healthcare System Management
Global Health
Ethics of Health Care
Introduction to Public Health
Medicine, Ethics, and Society
Introduction to the Sociology of Health and Well-Being
Introduction to Social Demography
Global Health Issues and Health Systems
Race, Class, and Health
Sociology of Health and Illness
Health Policy and Health Systems
Social Context of Public Health
Population and Society
Topics in Urban Politics and Governance (Topic 2: Human Health and the Environment)
Human and Societal Development:
Team-Based Communication
Communication Ethics
Introduction to Life Span Development
Family Relationships
Child Development
Adult Development
Development of Psychopathology from Infancy through Adolescence
Human Development in Minority and Immigrant Families
Infant Development and Attachment Relationships
Advanced Child and Family Development (Approved topics)
Communication in Health Care Settings
Introduction to Psychology
Biopsychology
Hormones and Behavior
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Selected Topics in Psychology (Topic 4: Health Psychology)
Introduction to the Study of Society
Death and Dying: Sociological Perspectives
Sociology of Gender
Child and Adolescent Health
Current Social Work Topics (Topic 9: Loss and Grief: Individual, Family, and Cultural Perspectives)
Nutrition:
Communication Ethics
Undergraduate Seminar in United States History (Topic 5: American Cultural History of Alcohol and Drugs)
Fundamentals of Nutrition
Introduction to Nutritional Sciences
Nutrition through the Life Cycle
Assessment of Nutritional Status
International Nutrition: The Developing World
Intermediate Nutrition and Metabolism
International Nutrition: Social and Environmental Policies
Community Nutrition

Optional: If additional hours are needed to complete the 18 hours for the certificate, a maximum of nine hours chosen from the following may be applied to the science major track:

RequirementsHours
Biochemistry and Chemistry:
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Biology:
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Physics:
Mechanics
Laboratory for Physics 301
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
General Physics Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Laboratory for Physics 302K
Laboratory for Physics 302L
Engineering Physics I
Engineering Physics II
Laboratory for Physics 303K
Laboratory for Physics 303L
Electricity and Magnetism
Laboratory for Physics 316
General Physics I
General Physics II
Laboratory for Physics 317K
Laboratory for Physics 317L
Statistics:
Elementary Statistical Methods
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
Statistics in Health Care
Statistics in Market Analysis
Biostatistics
Additional upper-division coursework in biochemistry, biology, and chemistry by approval of the undergraduate certificate adviser

Non-science Major Track

RequirementsHours
Complete 18 hours chosen from one of the health professions preparation sequences. The 18 hours may be composed of introductory coursework, advanced coursework, or a mixture of the two18
Pre-dental Preparation
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introduction to Chemical Practice
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
General Physics Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Laboratory for Physics 302K
Laboratory for Physics 302L 1
Advanced Coursework:
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Cell Biology
Genetics
General Microbiology 2
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Pre-medical Preparation
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introduction to Chemical Practice
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
General Physics Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Laboratory for Physics 302K
Laboratory for Physics 302L 1
Advanced Coursework:
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Cell Biology
Genetics
General Microbiology 2
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Pre-occupational Therapy Preparation
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introduction to Chemical Practice
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
Laboratory for Physics 302K 1
Advanced Coursework:
Genetics
Human Microscopic and Gross Anatomy
Human Systems Physiology
Human Systems Physiology Laboratory
Pre-optometry Preparation
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introduction to Chemical Practice
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
Laboratory for Physics 302K
General Physics Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Laboratory for Physics 302L 1
Advanced Coursework:
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Genetics
General Microbiology 2
General Microbiology Laboratory
Human Microscopic and Gross Anatomy
Human Systems Physiology
Human Systems Physiology Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Pre-physical Therapy Preparation
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introduction to Chemical Practice
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
Laboratory for Physics 302K
General Physics Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Laboratory for Physics 302L 1
Advanced Coursework:
Genetics
Human Microscopic and Gross Anatomy
Human Systems Physiology
Human Systems Physiology Laboratory
Pre-physician Assistant Preparation:
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introduction to Chemical Practice
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
Fundamentals of Nutrition
Advanced Coursework:
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Cell Biology
Genetics
General Microbiology Laboratory
General Microbiology 2
Molecular Biology
Human Microscopic and Gross Anatomy
Human Systems Physiology
Human Systems Physiology Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Pre-pharmacy Preparation:
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introduction to Chemical Practice
Data Analysis for the Health Sciences
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
Laboratory for Physics 302K 1
Advanced Coursework:
Genetics
General Microbiology Laboratory
General Microbiology 2
Human Microscopic and Gross Anatomy
Human Systems Physiology
Human Systems Physiology Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Pre-veterinary Preparation
Introductory Coursework:
Introductory Biology I
Introductory Biology II
Introductory Laboratory Experiments in Biology
Introduction to Chemical Practice
General Physics Technical Course: Mechanics, Heat, and Sound
Laboratory for Physics 302K
General Physics Technical Course: Electricity and Magnetism, Light, Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Laboratory for Physics 302L 1
Advanced Coursework:
Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Genetics
General Microbiology
General Microbiology Laboratory
Molecular Biology
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Biostatistics
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1. A completed calculus-based physics sequence may substitute for the purpose of earning the certificate.
2. Previously completed Biology 326M may substitute.

Scientific Computation and Data Sciences Certificate

The Certificate in Scientific Computation and Data Sciences helps undergraduates equip themselves with the mathematical, statistical, and computer-based tools necessary to investigate complex systems in a variety of applications. It is designed to appeal to students across the University in science, engineering, economics, premedicine, sociology, and many other disciplines. The program is administered by the Department of Statistics and Data Sciences. To be admitted, a student must be in good standing in an approved undergraduate degree program and must have earned a grade of at least C- in each certificate course he or she has completed. Students may apply for admission to the program at any point in their undergraduate study; they are encouraged to apply as early as possible so that they can be advised throughout the program.

The following coursework is required. Students must also complete Mathematics 408D or 408M as a prerequisite. No single course or topic may be used to meet more than one of these requirements.

RequirementsHours
SDS 222Introduction to Scientific Programming2
One course in linear algebra, discrete mathematics, or differential equations chosen from the following:3
Matrices and Matrix Calculations
Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory
Introduction to Stochastic Processes
Partial Differential Equations and Applications
Practical Linear Algebra I
Two courses in scientific computing, chosen from two of the following areas:6
Numerical Methods
Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering and Problem Solving
Elements of Scientific Computing
Elements of Scientific Computing: Honors
Numerical Methods
Scientific Computation in Numerical Analysis
Formulation and Solution of Geosystems Engineering Problems
Scientific and Technical Computing
Statistical Methods
Engineering Probability and Statistics
Probability and Random Processes
Applied Statistics
Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
Other Computing Topics
Elements of Graphics and Visualization
Elements of Databases
Advanced Topics in Elements of Computing (Approved topics)
Principles and Applications of Parallel Programming
Applied Linear Algebra
Introduction to Stochastic Processes
Numerical Methods for Applications
Partial Differential Equations and Applications
Topics in Mathematics (Approved topics)
Methods of Applied Mathematics
Simulation Modeling
Practical Linear Algebra II
Parallel Computing for Science and Engineering
Distributed and Grid Computing for Science and Engineering
Visualization and Data Analysis for Science and Engineering
One of the following courses in applied computational science:3
Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics
Principles of Computational Biology
Biomechanics of Human Movement
Computational Biomolecular Engineering
Topics in Biomedical Engineering (Approved topics)
Advanced Topics in Chemistry (Approved topics)
Elements of Graphics and Visualization
Advanced Topics in Elements of Computing (Approved topics)
Computational Economics
Topics in Electrical Engineering (Approved topics)
Computational Methods
Topics in Mathematics (Approved topics)
Mathematical Modeling in Science and Engineering
Introduction to Computational Physics
An independent research course: 4
Undergraduate Research

Textile Conservation and Museum Studies Certificate

The Certificate in Textile Conservation and Museum Studies helps undergraduates equip themselves with the fiber science, exhibition planning, textile conservation, and museum management skills necessary to conserve textiles in various settings. It is designed to appeal to students across the University in science, history, information science, computational science, merchandising, fiber science and apparel design, and many other disciplines. The program is administered by the Division of Textiles and Apparel in the School of Human Ecology. To be admitted, a student must be in good standing in an approved undergraduate degree program and must have earned a grade of at least C- in each certificate course he or she has completed. Students may apply for admission to the program at any point in their undergraduate study; they are encouraged to apply as early as possible so that they can be advised throughout the program.

The following coursework is required:

RequirementsHours
INF 304DIntroduction to Information Studies3
INF 335CInformation in Cyberspace3
TXA 205
TXA 105L
Textiles
and Textiles Laboratory
3
TXA 219C
TXA 119L
Applied Art in Visual Presentation
and Applied Art in Visual Presentation Laboratory
3
TXA 325LHistory of Dress and Cultural Change I3
TXA 325MHistory of Dress and Cultural Change II3
TXA 352CField Experience in Textile Conservation3
TXA 355DTextiles Artifact Management and Conservation3

UTeach Natural Sciences Secondary Teaching Option Certificate

The UTeach Natural Sciences program offers a secondary teaching option certificate to students who intend to teach at the middle or high school level.

The following coursework is required, with grades of at least C-:

RequirementsHours
One of the following courses:3
Selected Topics in Biology (Topic 2: Research Methods: UTeach)
Advanced Topics in Chemistry (Topic 1: Research Methods: UTeach)
Selected Topics in Physics (Topic 7: Research Methods: UTeach)
HIS 329UPerspectives on Science and Mathematics3
or PHL 329U Perspectives on Science and Mathematics
Eighteen hours of professional development coursework consisting of the following:18
Secondary School Teaching Practicum
Knowing and Learning in Math and Science
Knowing and Learning in Math and Science
Classroom Interactions
Classroom Interactions
Project-Based Instruction
Project-Based Instruction
Secondary Teacher Education Preparation: Step 1
and Secondary Teacher Education Preparation: STEP 2
and Student Teaching Seminar

In addition, students must meet the following requirements to graduate and be recommended for certification:

  1. University grade point average of at least 2.50
  2. Successful completion of secondary teacher certification and identified discipline specific content courses
  3. Successful passing of final teaching portfolio review, conducted by the UTeach Program in Natural Sciences

Special Requirements

Students who successfully complete this certificate may be eligible for recommendation for state teaching certification if they have met all professional development and discipline specific content courses. Students seeking middle grades certification must also complete the following courses with grades of at least C-Educational Psychology 350G or Psychology 301 and 304; and Curriculum and Instruction 339E.

State of Texas teacher certification requirements are governed by the Texas Education Agency and are subject to change. Students must adhere to current teacher certification requirements, even if they differ from those listed in the University catalogs.

For more information about these requirements, students should consult with the UTeach-Natural Sciences academic adviser.