Advanced Courses

LAW 221Q, 321Q, 421Q. Contracts for Foreign Lawyers.

Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Laws program. An introduction to the common law of contracts for foreign lawyers, with an emphasis on the methods by which rights and duties of promissory and quasi-promissory origin are created, transferred, limited, discharged, breached, and enforced. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Contracts for Foregin Lawyers) and Law 221Q, 321Q, 421Q may not both be counted.

LAW 223F, 323F. Federal Criminal Law.

Prosecution and defense of criminal trials in federal district court; considerable emphasis on white-collar crime. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 223M, 323M, 423M. International Criminal Law.

An examination of International Criminal Law. Subjects include the history of international criminal justice; the core crimes of international criminal law; theories of criminal liability and available defenses; international terrorism, U.S. policy towards the International Criminal Court; and dilemmas of transitional justice. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: International Criminal Law) and Law 223M, 323M, 423M may not both be counted.

LAW 129S, 229S, 329S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Law.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the School of Law's International Student Programs (ISP) office. Credit is recorded as assigned by an ISP Administrator in the School of Law. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 230M, 330M, 430M. Real Estate Finance.

An advanced problems course dealing with acquisition, financing, development, and disposition of real estate. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 231K, 331K, or 431K is recommended but not required.

LAW 231D, 331D. Real Estate Development.

Intermediate-level overview of the real estate development process and relevant areas of law: land acquisition, leasing, construction finance, and permanent finance. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 231K, 331K, 431K. Real Estate Transactions.

Intermediate conveyancing course dealing with the transfer, finance, and development of real estate. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 132C, 232C, 332C. Advanced Legal Research.

One, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.

Topic 1: Advanced Research: Foreign and International Law. Introduction to the sources and methods of research in foreign and international law, tailored to the needs of American lawyers. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.
Topic 2: Advanced Research: Texas Law. Introduction to the judicial, statutory, and administrative sources of Texas law. Topics include research in state administrative law and legislative histories. Both print and electronic resources are covered. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 132D, 232D, 332D. Advanced Legal Writing.

Advanced coverage of practical legal-writing skills. One, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 232G, 332G. Basic Drafting.

Practice in drafting a client letter, a basic contract, and a set of rules; review of sentence-level skills, organization, and tone. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 232H, 332H, 432H. Appellate Clerkship Writing.

Designed to familiarize students about to begin appellate clerkships with the writing and research skills expected of clerks, as well as provide a glimpse into the judicial process at the appellate level. Students will analyze briefs and record excerpts, write bench memos, and draft and edit opinions and dissents. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Appellate Clerkship Writing) and Law 232H, 332H, 432H may not both be counted. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

LAW 132P, 232P, 332P. Writing for the Court.

Designed to familiarize students with the writing techniques judges expect from clerks and employers expect from lawyers. Students will be exposed to actual court documents and will use them to draft memos, opinions, orders, and other written products. One, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

LAW 232Q, 332Q, 432Q. Legal Research and Writing for Foreign Lawyers.

Restricted to students without a Doctor of Jurisprudence degree in the Master of Laws program. Introduces foreign lawyers to the case-law method, the basic tools for conducting legal research, and the basic conventions and expectations for creating professional legal work product. Research and writing assignments will build on each other, culminating in a full-length, formal analytical memorandum that could potentially serve as a professional writing sample. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Legal Research and Writing for Foreign Lawyers) and Law 232Q, 332Q, 432Q may not both be counted. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 232T, 332T, 432T. Advanced Legal Research and Writing: Texas.

Focuses on the resources and methodology used in performing legal research in Texas. Designed to familiarize students with the various types of legal research such as statutory law, case law, administrative regulations, and secondary practice materials in both print and electronic formats. Students will complete both research and writing projects for the class. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Advanced Legal Research) and Law 232T, 332T, 432T may not both be counted. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 235C, 335C, 435C. Analytic Methods for Lawyers.

An introduction to arguments framed in quantitative terms. Subjects include: financial economics, personal finance, decision trees, game theory, accounting and financial statements, and microeconomics. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Analytic Methods for Lawyers) and Law 235C, 335C, 435C may not both be counted.

LAW 235D, 335D, 435D. Animal Law.

An overview of the jurisprudential basis and theoretical underpinnings of animals in our legal system. Examines the developing field of animal law through the prism of traditional legal disciplines, including torts, contracts, criminal, regulatory, administrative, and constitutional law. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Animal Law) and Law 235D, 335D, 435D may not both be counted.

LAW 235E, 335E, 435E. Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence.

Designed to help students identify, discover, interpret, authenticate, and challenge electronically stored information. Subjects include information technology and computer forensics, federal rules, and e-discovery cases. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Electronic Discovery) and Law 235E, 335E, 435E may not both be counted.

LAW 235F, 335F, 435F. Election Law and Policy.

An introduction to traditional election law. Subjects include the constitutional, legal, and policy considerations that govern redistricting and campaign finance; laws and policies that govern the administration of elections; and an overview of issues currently confronting the field of election law and administration. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week per semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Election Law and Policy) and Law 235F, 335F, 435F may not both be counted.

LAW 135G, 235G, 335G, 435G. Reading Group.

For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 135G, 235G, 335G, 435G and 135P, 235P, 335P, 435P may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAW 235J, 335J, 435J. International Commercial Arbitration.

Designed to help students acquire the techniques and skills for advising clients, drafting adequate arbitration agreements, and advising on enforcement of international arbitration awards. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: International Commercial Arbitration) and Law 235J, 335J, 435J may not both be counted.

LAW 235L, 335L, 435L. Law Libraries.

An overview of law librarianship and the legal information environment. Designed to convey an understanding of the context in which law librarians, legal publishers, and other legal information professionals work. Introduces students to the organization and communication of legal information and the particular roles and responsibilities of legal information providers and institutions. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Law Libraries) and Law 235L, 335L, 435L may not both be counted.

LAW 135P, 235P, 335P, 435P. Reading Group.

For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 135G, 235G, 335G, 435G and 135P, 235P, 335P, 435P may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAW 239, 339, 439. Jurisprudence.

Underlying problems in the functioning of a legal order; legal definition and justice as factors in decision making; discovery and interpretation of authority; rights and privileges of the person relative to society and government; conditions for imposing legal responsibility on a person; procedures for decision making; the relationship between law and the market in economic decision making. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 240, 340. Family Law.

Legal problems related to the establishment, dissolution, and reorganization of family relationships, including marriage, divorce, annulment, alimony and child support, custody, and injuries to family relations. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 240M, 340M, 440M. Antitrust: Economic Analysis and Legal Interpretation.

An examination of the business functions and competitive impact of practices that are subject to antitrust regulation to determine their legality under United States antitrust laws. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 241F, 341F. Literature and the Law.

Justice and law as they are presented in literary works that deal with race and work. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 341G. Sports Law.

An amalgam of contracts, antitrust, and labor law as they affect professional and collegiate sports in the United States. Emphasis on issues affecting professional team sports. Individual and college (especially Title IX) sports and the regulation of agents. Course is best taken during the student's third year. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Knowledge of baseball, basketball, and football are required. Law 260K, 360K, or 460K and Law 261K, 361K, or 461K are recommended.

LAW 241L, 341L, 441L. Environmental Law.

Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.

Topic 1: Introduction, Air, Water, and Toxics. An introduction to pollution control, the common law antecedents, and early statutory developments, and an intensive study of the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act.
Topic 2: Hazardous Wastes and Enforcement. A study of enforcement issues, including citizens' suits. Examines the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund). Prerequisite: Law 341L (Topic 1) is recommended but not required.
Topic 3: Environmental Law and Natural Resources. An introduction to environmental thinking in the context of scarce publicly and privately owned natural resources. Covers public trust doctrine, relevance of the Tenth Amendment to environmental protection, the National Endowment Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act.

LAW 241M, 341M, 441M. Mass Media Law.

Regulation of broadcast media by the Federal Communications Commission; the constitutional and administrative law problems generated by regulation. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 241P, 341P. Comparative Environmental Law.

Property rights and the environment, constitutional basis for environmental protection, sustainable development and the role of law, environmental enforcement, and trade and environment. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 241R, 341R. Entertainment Law.

Legal aspects of producing and financing a motion picture, with minor attention to the theatre industry. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K.

LAW 241U, 341U, 441U. Communications Law.

Effect of federal, state, and local regulation and policy on the convergence of technologies and markets in the telecommunications industry. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 242M, 342M, 442M. Bankruptcy.

Introduction to Title II of the United States Code and related state and federal laws: both liquidation and reorganization bankruptcy, including exemptions, discharge of debt, avoidance of powers of trustees, and rights of various classes of creditors; jurisdiction and procedure. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Law 180D, 280D, 380D, or 480D.

LAW 142R. Bankruptcy Workshop.

Representation of debtors and secured creditors in chapter 11 bankruptcy. Further study and application of the basic concepts of business bankruptcy, with emphasis on structuring and drafting. One lecture hour a week for one semester.

LAW 243C, 343C. United States Law, Introduction.

Restricted to international students enrolled in the Master of Laws program; exchange students may petition to enroll in the class. An introduction to the concepts of law fundamental to, and the legal institutions operating within, the United States legal system. Includes an overview of the United States Constitution and of the functions and procedures of civil and criminal courts. Required for Master of Laws students with a foreign law degree, although those with a law degree from a common law country may request a waiver. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 243E, 343E. The Emergence of Modern European Law.

Historical and cultural development of modern European law on the Continent and in England. Differences between English and American laws. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 243G, 343G, 443G. East European Law in Transition.

The collapse of socialist law in Eastern Europe and the subsequent problems and progress of law reform. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 243T, 343T. International Tort Law.

In-depth analysis of some of the common problems and current methodology in American, German, and English modern tort laws. This is both an advanced torts and accident compensation course and an introduction to the comparative method. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 244, 344, 444. International Business Transactions.

Problems confronting exporters, importers, and firms doing business abroad; emphasizes American and foreign tariff, antitrust, corporation, and arbitration law, and the European Union. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester.

LAW 245, 345, 445. Products Liability.

Problems of preventing and compensating harm attributable to dangerous or defective products through regulation by government agencies, the judicial process, and market forces. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 245D, 345D. Consumer Protection (Deceptive Trade Practices Act).

Overview of the primary common law causes of action available to purchasers of real property, goods, and services. Case law under the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act and Article 21.21 of the Texas Insurance Code. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 346K. Negotiation.

An exploration, largely through simulated exercises, of the lawyer's role in the negotiation of transactions. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 346L. Negotiation in Criminal Cases.

An exploration, largely through simulated exercises, of the prosecutor's and defense attorney's roles in the negotiation of criminal cases. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 147, 247. Basic Business and Financial Concepts.

Brief introduction to basic business and financial concepts (such as financial statements, equity and debt financing, securities transactions) for students with little or no business background. One or two lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for any of the following: Law 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K; more than six semester hours of undergraduate coursework in accounting; or more than three courses in economics or business. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 147L, 247L. Business and Investment Math for Lawyers.

Introduction to basic vocabulary, concepts, and numbers of investing and business. The basics of investing and some business issues, including corporate capital structure, and an introduction to the framework of accounting. One or two lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 147L, 247L, and 254J, 354J, 454J, 554J, 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K may not both be counted.

LAW 248C, 348C, 448C. Civil Rights Litigation.

A basic introduction to the theory and practice of suing under state and federal statutory and constitutional law for redress of harm to one's civil rights by the government or its agents. The course balances the traditional approach of exposing students to litigation strategies with that of relating the rule of law to society. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 248D, 348D, 448D. Americans with Disabilities.

The history of disability law, the trends in federal rulings, and emerging issues as Congress debates new legislation related to persons with disabilities. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 248E, 348E, 448E. International Human Rights Law.

An overview of international human rights law, including its history and development. Covers domestic, regional and international legal systems, and the extent to which they incorporate and implement human rights; and contemporary political and theoretical debates over the scope and interpretation of human rights law. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 249, 349, 449. Children and the Law.

Survey of important legal problems involving children and their relationships to their families and to the state (including the public education system). Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 350C. Enterprise of Technology: Laboratory to Market.

Study of the activities involved in commercializing a technology from conception to profitable enterprise. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 250G, 350G, 450G. Intellectual Property, Introduction.

General overview of intellectual property law. Analysis of competing policies underlying intellectual property laws. Fundamentals of trade secrets, patent, copyright, and trademark law. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 250J, 350J. International Intellectual Property.

Selected issues involving the international protection of intellectual property, with emphasis on copyright. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 250K, 350K, 450K. Copyright.

Literary and artistic property, the law related to trade identity, and other rules of the competitive game. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 250L, 350L, 450L. Patent Law.

The substantive law of patents in the United States. Designed for individuals interested in practicing in the field of intellectual property law. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 350M. Computer Law.

Various forms of intellectual property protection as they have been applied to computers; emerging issues in the law of computer networks; antitrust issues in the computer industry. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 250G, 350G, 450G, 250K, 350K, 450K, 250P, 350P, or 450P.

LAW 250N, 350N. Trademarks.

Nature of marks, distinctiveness, acquisition of rights in marks, registration, loss of rights, infringement, defenses, remedies, trade dress, federal unfair competition, dilution, licensing, protection of marks outside the United States. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 250R, 350R. Patent Litigation.

Analysis of the case law and statutes governing patent enforcement, and comparison with the most recent decisions of the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Includes study of infringement and remedies. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 250P, 350P, or 450P is recommended but not required.

LAW 250T, 350T. Patent Prosecution Workshop.

An overview of the rules of practice before the Patent and Trademark Office, and an introduction to the practical considerations in preparing and prosecuting a patent application. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Law 250P, 350P, or 450P, or concurrent enrollment in Law 250R or 350R.

LAW 251C, 351C, 451C. History of American Law.

History of law in the United States, from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 251K, 351K. Criminal Procedure: Investigation.

Rules governing police conduct and the effect of these rules on admission of evidence; search and seizure, lineups, confessions, and similar matters. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 253L, 353L, 453L. Economic Efficiency Analysis.

Addresses the economically efficient ways to forecast and analyze the economic efficiency of a choice in economies that contain imperfections and inconsistencies. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 353M. Financial Markets and Institutions.

How financial markets are organized and function. Includes debt equity and foreign exchange markets, primary and secondary market operations, and investment banking. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 253N, 353N, 453N. Law and Economics Workshop.

Speaker-based law and economics empirical workshop. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 253N, 353N, 453N, 253P, 353P, 453P, 279M, 379M (Topic: Law, Business, and Economics Workshop).

LAW 253P, 353P, 453P. Law and Economics Workshop.

Speaker-based law and economics empirical workshop. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 279M, 379M (Topic: Law, Business, and Economics Workshop); 253N, 353N, 453N; 253P, 353P, 453P. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAW 254, 354, 454. Corporate Finance.

Advanced corporation law; topics include enterprise and securities valuation, capitalization, senior securities, distributions to shareholders, voluntary reorganizations, and business combinations. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K.

LAW 254C, 354C. Tax and Business Strategy.

The effect of tax on business decisions. Knowledge of algebra is required. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 354D. Corporate Governance.

The issues faced by CEOs and those who report directly to them as they balance their time between achieving quarterly performance targets and building strong companies that can sustain above-market financial performance in the future. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 254J, 354J, 454J, 554J. Federal Income Taxation.

An overview of the federal income tax, mostly as it applies to individuals. Two, three, four, or five lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 254N, 354N. Federal Income Taxation A.

Taxation of personal income and some typical personal investments. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 254P, 354P. Federal Income Taxation B.

Taxation of commercial investments and operations. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 254N, 354N, or the equivalent.

LAW 354Q. Partnership Tax.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 254J, 354J, 454J, 554J, 254N, or 354N. Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K and a course in corporate income tax are recommended.

LAW 254R, 354R, 454R. Corporate Tax.

Examines taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Students should be familiar with basic concepts of taxable income including basis, calculation of gain and loss, capital gains, and treatment of nonrecognition transactions. Representative transactions covered include the formation of a corporation, distributions to shareholders, redemptions of stock, liquidations of corporations, and corporate reorganizations. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Corporate Tax) and Law 254R, 354R, 454R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Law 254J, 354J, 454J, 554J, 254N, 354N, 254P, or 354P.

LAW 254U, 354U. Federal Income Taxation of Trusts and Estates.

Federal income taxation of estates, trusts, grantors, and beneficiaries, as prescribed by subchapter J of the Internal Revenue Code. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 254J, 354J, 454J, or 554J.

LAW 255C, 355C. Education Law.

Legal and practical doctrines governing the creation and operation of school districts; employment relations between professional and nonprofessional employees and local school districts; and regulation of students and limitations on the right of school districts to discipline children. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 255L, 355L, 455L. Higher Education and the Law.

Academic freedom and tenure; related constitutional issues; employment discrimination and collective bargaining in the university context. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 256, 356, 456. Estate Planning.

Advanced problems in estate planning: marital deduction trusts; planning for community and separate property; inter vivos gifts and trusts; closely held business interests; farm and ranch properties; income taxation of estates and trusts. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 289N, 389N, 489N, or 589N.

LAW 257, 357, 457. Texas Marital Relationships and Divorce.

All aspects of divorce; premarital contracts, marriage, annulment, and ongoing family relationships. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 258N. Texas Legislature: Process and Procedure.

The ways the Texas Legislature works, both officially and otherwise. Consideration of a wide range of procedural and substantive topics, with emphasis on the regulation of citizen conduct through statute, rather than on the purely political aspects of the institution. Two lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 260K, 360K, 460K. Antitrust.

Federal and state law dealing with concerted action in unreasonable restraint of trade; monopolization; price discrimination, exclusive dealing arrangements, and other unfair competition; permissive resale price maintenance; mergers and joint ventures; limitations on the patent legal monopoly. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 361, 461. Administrative Law.

Forms of law governing jurisdiction and procedure of state and federal agencies; right and scope of judicial review; relation of administrative agencies to legislature and chief executive. Three or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 361E. Administrative Law, Texas.

The law of and about administrative agencies; comparison between federal and Texas administrative law. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 261J, 361J, 461J. Employment Law.

An examination of legal doctrines governing employment relations outside the collective bargaining arena: development of the common law doctrine of at-will employment, the doctrine of free market control of employment, and problems raised by new employee rights, including affirmative action, pregnancy disability, and comparable worth. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 261K, 361K, 461K. Labor Law.

Collective bargaining and government intervention; functions of labor unions; settlement of labor disputes; rights of employees and of union members. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 261M, 361M. ERISA: An Introduction to Employee Pension and Health Plans.

Pension taxation, antidiscrimination rules, fiduciary duties arising from employee benefit trusts, and the regulatory tension between federal and state governments regarding health benefits. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 454J or 254N.

LAW 262L, 362L, 462L. Remedies.

Compensatory, restitutionary, and exemplary damages for breach of contract or for injury of personal and property interests; injunctions and other equitable relief. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 362P. Restitution.

The law of restitution (unjust or unjustified enrichment), presented as the third heading of private, civil liability in the legal system, along with contract and tort. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 263T, 363T, 463T. International Energy Transactions.

International business transactions in the energy and natural resource industries. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 263U, 363U, 463U. Energy Law.

An introduction to the legal and regulatory regimes governing the energy industry, as well as the important economic and political concerns that underlie the regulation of the production and sale of energy. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 263U, 363U, 463U and Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Energy Law) may not both be counted.

LAW 264C, 364C, 464C. Medicine and the Law.

Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 1: Bioethics. Legal issues arising from the development of biomedical technologies that extend life and manipulate its creation. Law 264C focuses on death and dying and reproductive issues. Law 364C covers additional material on human experimentation and organ transplantation.
Topic 2: Regulation of the Health Care System. Medicine as an industry; the types of legal regulation that control the medical profession and regulate the health care system.

LAW 264D, 364D. Medical Practice and Law.

The language and structure of the medical profession; the process of establishing medical diagnoses and treatments; the concept of standard of care as applied in medicine; and the legal validation and use of medical information. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 264E, 364E, 464E. Health Law.

An introduction to health law. Subjects include legal issues in health care delivery, health insurance financing, and the responsibilities of health care professionals to patients. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Health Law) and Law 264E, 364E, 464E may not both be counted.

LAW 364G. Indian Law, Federal.

Federal law governing Indian tribes and Indian people. Contemporary original tribal source material. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 264R, 364R, 464R. Reproductive Rights and Justice.

An analysis of reproductive rights as they are defined by United States law including abortion; voluntary and forced contraception and sterilization; minor's rights and education; public funding; assisted reproduction and surrogacy; the rights of underrepresented groups; and international law. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Reproductive Rights and Justice) and Law 264R, 364R, 464R may not both be counted.

LAW 264S, 364S. Construction Law.

Issues in general United States law that affect commercial and industrial construction, with emphasis on significant Texas cases. Overview of the construction process, examining roles of various parties, followed by consideration of the legal problems frequently encountered. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 264T, 364T. Construction Litigation.

Analysis of theories of liability and defense in the area of construction litigation, with emphasis on Texas law. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 265M, 365M. Land-Use Regulation.

Legal aspects of government programs for controlling land use, emphasizing urban problems. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 267M, 367M, 467M. Estate and Gift Tax.

Federal gift, estate, and generation-skipping taxes. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Law 256, 356, or 456. Prerequisite: Law 289N, 389N, 489N, or 589N.

LAW 368C. Introduction to Mexican Law.

A general study of the Mexican legal system, including public, social, and private law. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 268N, 368N, 468N. Employment Discrimination Law.

Issues related to the elimination of discrimination and the promotion of equality in employment. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 269, 369, 469. Insurance.

Solicitation and sale of insurance; persons and interests protected by insurance; selection and control of risks; disposition of claims. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 269P, 369P. Texas Insurance Litigation.

Detailed review of consumers' rights and remedies in insurance litigation. Emphasis on practical applications of substantive law, including actionable conduct, statutory and common law theories, standing, persons and entities that may be liable, remedies, defenses, presuit considerations, pleadings, discovery, trial practice, and ethics. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 270F, 370F. Criminal Defense, Advanced.

The basics of criminal defense, from a practical perspective. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 270F, 370F and 270J, 370J may not both be counted. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAW 270J, 370J. Criminal Defense, Advanced.

The basics of criminal defense, from a practical perspective. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 270F, 370F and 270J, 370J may not both be counted.

LAW 270M, 370M. Criminal Procedure: Prosecution.

The litigation of a criminal case, from the defendant's initial appearance in court through pretrial matters and the trial itself. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 370R. Torts, Advanced.

Issues that arise in a sophisticated tort practice. Personal injury litigation is considered from both the plaintiff's and the defense's viewpoint. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 370S. Commercial Torts.

Torts that protect purely economic interests and the interplay of tort and contract law. Includes misrepresentation, interference with business relations, defamation in a private context, the theory of prima facie tort, and the insurance torts. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 370T. Mass Tort Litigation.

Problems in complex mass tort litigation that emerged during the 1980s and have become a permanent part of the litigation landscape. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 270U, 370U. White Collar Crime.

Conspiracy, mail and wire fraud, money laundering, RICO, bank fraud, health care fraud, and tax fraud. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 171F, 271F, 371F, 471F. Public Affairs and Law.

For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 171F, 271F, 371F, 471F and 171V, 271V, 371V, 471V may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAW 271M, 371M, 471M. Accounting for Lawyers.

Introduction to the theory of financial accounting and its numerous applications to the practice of law. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 471N. National Security Law.

Survey of topics relating law and security: strategic arms and arms control, economic sanctions, intelligence. Four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 371R. Perspectives on Public Policy.

Policy formation in the areas of economics, national security, science, technology, and trade. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 171V, 271V, 371V, 471V. Public Affairs and Law.

For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 171F, 271F, 371F, 471F and 171V, 271V, 371V, 471V may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

LAW 274G, 374G, 474G. Corporations.

Introduction to the basic legal rules and principles governing the relations among managers, shareholders, and creditors in the business enterprise. Emphasis is on public corporations, Delaware corporation law, an ex ante "planning" perspective, and an overall "law-and-economics" approach to the study of economic institutions. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 274G, 374G, 474G, 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K, 479M (Topic: Corporations).

LAW 374H. International and Comparative Business Organizations.

Study and comparison of the different business organizations in civil law systems (France and Mexico) and in common law systems (United States). Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 274J, 374J. Mergers and Acquisitions.

Legal issues involved in the acquisition of business enterprises by multinational corporations: initial negotiations, documentation, financial structuring of the purchase, and sale of business enterprises. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K. Business Associations.

Basic course in the organization, management, financing, and dissolution of business associations and their creditors. Although some attention is given to agency principles governing the representation of business associations and to partnership law, emphasis is on the business corporation with particular attention to the problems of the closed corporation. Two, three, four, or five lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 274G, 374G, 474G, 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K, 479M (Topic: Corporations).

LAW 274R, 374R, 474R. International Tax.

Overview of ways the United States taxes (1) nonresident aliens and foreign corporations on income from United States sources and (2) United States persons and corporations on income received from international sources. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 254J, 354J, 454J, 554J, 254N, or 354N.

LAW 275W, 375W, 475W. Civil Litigation Skills, Intermediate.

Techniques such as preparing for and taking a deposition, drafting and responding to discovery, electronic issues, courtroom technology, and voir dire. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 175F, 275F, 375F, 475F, 575F. Civil Litigation, Advanced.

An advanced course encompassing the principles and skills of trial advocacy and civil procedure; pretrial discovery and motion practice, alternative dispute resolution, jury trial, and appeal. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 175F, 275F, 375F, 475F, 575F and 176S, 276S, 376S, 476S, 576S may not both be counted. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Law 476H; or Law 276M, 376M, or 476M.

LAW 175P, 275P, 375P, 475P. Intensive Trial Skills.

Designed for the advocacy student interested in improving trial skills. Consists of intensive skills exercises and trial technique training. Students try up to four cases in one semester in a fast-paced environment. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 175P, 275P, 375P, 475P and 176H, 276H, 376H, 476H may not both be counted. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only.

LAW 275W, 375W, 475W. Civil Litigation Skills, Intermediate.

Techniques such as preparing for and taking a deposition, drafting and responding to discovery, electronic issues, courtroom technology, and voir dire. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 376C. Texas Civil Procedure: Pretrial.

Pretrial preparation for litigation in Texas courts. The litigation process from inception to the days immediately before trial. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 376C, 376D, 276P, 376P, 476P.

LAW 376D. Texas Civil Procedure: Trial and Appeal.

Trials and appeals in Texas courts, from the days immediately before trial through the appellate process. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 376C, 376D, 276P, 376P, 476P.

LAW 176H, 276H, 376H, 476H. Intensive Trial Skills.

Designed for the advocacy student interested in improving trial skills. Consists of intensive skills exercises and trial technique training. Students try up to four cases in one semester in a fast-paced environment. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 175P, 275P, 375P, 475P and 176H, 276H, 376H, 476H may not both be counted.

LAW 276L, 376L, 476L. Water Law.

Judicial, legislative, and administrative problems in water resources development, allocation, and control. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 276M, 376M, 476M. Advocacy Survey.

The basics of persuasive techniques in all litigation settings, including pretrial motions, alternative dispute resolution, arbitration, voir dire, and trial. Course culminates in a mock trial. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 176N, 276N, 376N, 476N, 576N, 676N. Advocacy Survey: Skills.

A skills course covering the basics of persuasive techniques in all litigation settings, including pretrial motions, alternative dispute resolution, arbitration, voir dire, and trial. Course culminates in a mock trial. One, two, three, four, five, or six lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 476G, 176N, 276N, 376N, 476N, 576N, 676N. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Law 276M, 376M, or 476M.

LAW 276P, 376P, 476P. Texas Civil Procedure: Survey.

A survey of the rules governing civil litigation in the Texas state courts, including pleadings, forum selection, discovery, summary judgment, jury charge, judgments, appeals, and settlements. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Law 376C, 376D, 276P, 376P, 476P.

LAW 176S, 276S, 376S, 476S, 576S. Civil Litigation, Advanced.

An advanced course encompassing the principles and skills of trial advocacy and civil procedure; pretrial discovery and motion practice, alternative dispute resolution, jury trial, and appeal. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 175F, 275F, 375F, 475F, 575F and 176S, 276S, 376S, 476S, 576S may not both be counted. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Law 476H; or Law 276M, 376M, or 476M.

LAW 276T, 376T. Texas Civil Litigation: Pretrial and Trial Strategy.

Preparation of a civil case for trial, including ethical considerations and client relations, preparation of pleadings, preparation of discovery requests and responses to discovery requests, taking depositions, handling experts, evaluation of cases, and final trial preparation. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 276U, 376U, 476U. Appellate Advocacy.

Study of the advocate's strategies and role in the appellate process. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester.

LAW 276W, 376W, 476W. Advocacy Practice and Theory for the New Millennium.

For students who have mastered the basic advocacy skills and will focus on cutting edge advocacy theories and techniques. Study centers on recent developments in behavioral science, communication, psychology, and technology. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 277, 377, 477. Admiralty Law.

A survey of the law applicable to the business of using the oceans and other navigable waters to transport people, goods, and materials, and the related business of exploring for oil and gas beneath those waters. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 377D. Maritime Injuries Litigation.

A review of recent important decisions dealing with the rights of maritime workers, harbor workers, and others injured under circumstances of potential admiralty jurisdiction. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 277, 377, or 477.

LAW 177J. Texas Civil Procedure: Survey Workshop.

Further study and application of the basic concepts of Texas civil procedure covered in Law 276P, 376P, and 476P. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 177J and Law 179M (Topic: Texas Civil Procedure: Survey Workshop) may not both be counted.

LAW 278J, 378J. Domestic Violence and the Law.

Social and historical context of battering; related civil and criminal law issues; alternative procedural frameworks and legislative reforms; state-of-the-art court programs working to combat domestic violence. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 178K, 278K, 378K, 478K. Texas Family Law.

The legal regime in Texas relating to the establishment, dissolution, and reorganization of family relationships, including marriage, divorce, annulment, alimony and child support, custody, and injuries to family relations. One, two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 278N, 378N, 478N. Texas Criminal Procedure: Pretrial.

The statutory law and appellate case law related to pretrial criminal court procedure in Texas. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 251K, 351K, 270M, or 370M.

LAW 378P, 478P. Texas Criminal Procedure: Trial and Beyond.

The statutory law and appellate case law related to criminal court procedure--trial and beyond--in Texas. Three or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 251K, 351K, 270M, or 370M.

LAW 278R, 378R. Capital Punishment.

General jurisprudential and moral issues related to capital punishment; developments in capital punishment law over the past two decades. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M. Contemporary Legal Developments.

For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M and 179P, 279P, 379P, 479P, 579P, 679P may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.

LAW 179P, 279P, 379P, 479P, 579P, 679P. CONTEMPORARY LEGAL DEVELOPMENT.

For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M and 179P, 279P, 379P, 479P, 579P, 679P may not both be counted unless the topics vary. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Will vary with topic.

LAW 280C, 380C, 480C. Payment Systems.

Covers Articles 3, 4, 5, and 7 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Deals primarily with payment systems. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 180D, 280D, 380D, 480D. Secured Credit.

Credit transactions in which the creditor by contract obtains a lien on personal property--Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. One, two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. It is recommended that students take Law 280C, 380C, or 480C before this course.

LAW 180R. Secured Credit Workshop.

Further study and application of the basic concepts of secured credit covered in Law 180D, 280D, 380D, 480D. One lecture hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Law 180D, 280D, 380D, or 480D.

LAW 181C, 281C, 381C, 481C. Constitutional Law II.

Emphasis on First Amendment rights, due process, equal protection, or other topics as announced. One, two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

LAW 281R, 381R, 481R. Alternative Dispute Resolution.

Advanced specialty course. Negotiation, meditation, arbitration, minitrial, and other means of resolving disputes short of full litigation. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester.

LAW 281S, 381S. Mediation.

Skills and techniques needed for effective negotiation and mediation. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 281U, 381U. International Dispute Settlement.

Explores the increasing variety of techniques, norms, and institutions available to states and other actors for the peaceful resolution of international disputes. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 282, 382, 482. Conflict of Laws.

Treatment of claims concerning breach of contract, tortious injury of person or property, ownership of land or chattels, and status, where the claims involve facts foreign to the adjudicating state; jurisdiction and enforcement of foreign judgments. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 282C, 382C. Immigration and Citizenship.

Admission, exclusion, and deportation of aliens; native-born, derivative, and naturalized citizenship. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 382D. International Trade.

Legal principles and processes that affect both private and governmental decisions about international economic relations. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 282F, 382F, 482F. International Petroleum Transactions.

International petroleum transactions in the context of a single industry: the various participants and the transactions that take place at each stage of the industry, from acquisition of development rights through exploration and production to transportation and marketing. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 182G, 282G, 382G, 482G. International Law.

Survey of the history and major principles of international law including sources and subjects of international law, the law and interpretation of treaties, the relationship between international law and United States law, and the peaceful resolution of disputes. Also examines a number of specific subjects including human rights, humanitarian law, international criminal law, and the use of force. One, two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 282N, 382N, 482N. Comparative Law.

Nature and functions of the comparative study of law; study in detail of history, territorial expansion, and basic features of the civil law. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 282P, 382P, 482P. Complex Litigation.

Advanced civil procedure course dealing with multiparty and complex cases, including problems in litigation context. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 382R. International Litigation.

Special problems of civil litigation when one or both parties are nonresident aliens, or the facts have significant international contacts, or both. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 382T. International Business Litigation.

Resolution of disputes from transnational business transactions. International arbitration, gathering evidence abroad, and enforcement of judgments transnationally. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 283, 383, 483. Evidence.

Principles and rules governing admissibility and relevance of evidence in trial courts; qualification, privileges, and examination of witnesses; burden of proof and presumptions. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 284D, 384D. Corporation Law, Finance, Securities, and Reorganizations.

Examination of areas of corporation law not covered or covered briefly in Law 274K, 374K, 474K, 574K. Topics include the nature and theory of the firm and valuation of the firm and its securities. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K.

LAW 284E, 384E, 484E. Nonprofit Organizations.

Introduction to the laws, policies, and ideals affecting the creation and governance of nonprofit organizations, including medical and health-related institutions, educational institutions, cultural institutions, social clubs, service delivery organizations, religious (or "faith-based") institutions, and advocacy organizations. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 279M, 379M (Topic: Nonprofit Organizations) and 284E, 384E, 484E may not both be counted.

LAW 284N, 384N, 484N. Securities Regulation.

Federal and state regulation of the distribution of, and trading in, securities, with particular emphasis on problems of coverage and administration of the Securities Act of 1933, the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, and the Investment Company Act of 1940. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Law 274K, 374K, 474K, or 574K.

LAW 285, 385. Professional Responsibility.

The lawyer's responsibility in making and administering the law; the codes of ethics and problems of professional conduct. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 286, 386, 486, 586. Federal Courts.

Advanced study of public law, focusing on federal judicial power to make law, to intervene in state judicial proceedings, and to govern state or nation by decree. Two, three, four, or five lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 389G. Gender and the Law.

Examination and evaluation of the role of law in maintaining a gendered society. Case readings, examination of statutes, and readings that provide different perspectives brought to this and related questions by feminist theory. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 289N, 389N, 489N, 589N. Wills and Estates.

Execution, revocation, and interpretation of wills; future interests, particularly those involved in testamentary trusts; perpetuities; powers of appointment. Two, three, four, or five lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 389P. Legal Scholarship.

The genres of legal scholarship, including jurisprudence, traditional legal analysis, law and economics, sociology of law, and legal history. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 289S, 389S, 489S. Social Science and Law.

Sociological theories and research about law and legal institutions. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 190, 290, 390. Oil and Gas.

Creation and transfer of interests in oil and gas; mutual obligations of parties to a mineral lease; correlative obligations of neighboring mineral owners; regulation of production. One, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 290D, 390D, 490D. Oil and Gas Law, Leasing, and Regulation.

The fundamentals of oil and gas law and commonly created interests in oil and gas, as well as the lands from where it is extracted, with an emphasis on the oil and gas lease; rights and obligations created thereby; rights and duties between mineral and surface owners; and protection of interests in oil and gas properties against trespassers and wrongful claimants. Also includes state regulation of drilling and production. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Oil and Gas Leasing and Regulation) and Law 290D, 390D, 490D may not both be counted.

LAW 290E, 390E, 490E. Oil and Gas Taxation.

An analysis of the United States federal income taxation of domestic oil and gas operations and transactions. Examines taxation associated with the operational life cycle of oil and gas operations including exploration, development, production, and abandonment, as well as transactions involving oil and gas interests analysis acquisition, disposition, structuring and investment. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester. Law 179M, 279M, 379M, 479M, 579M, 679M (Topic: Oil and Gas Taxation) and Law 290E, 390E, 490E may not both be counted.

LAW 294L, 394L, 494L. Local Government Law.

State constitutional law concerning intergovernmental relations and the organization and administration of local government; ad valorem and other taxes; finance, lawmaking, personnel, contracts, and tort liability. Two, three, or four lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 294P, 394P. State and Local Government.

Study of subnational governments in the United States. Two or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

LAW 296K, 396K, 496K. Legislation.

Roles of persons, institutions, courts, administrative agencies, and legislatures in lawmaking; interpretation of legislation; decision making and legal advocacy in the legislative process; drafting of legislation. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester.

LAW 197C, 297C, 397C, 497C, 597C, 697C. Clinical Program.

Practical experience in different areas of law. Topics to be announced. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.

LAW 197D, 297D, 397D, 497D, 597D, 697D. Clinical Program: Practice Skills.

Practical experience in different areas of the law. Topics to be announced. Fieldwork to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.

LAW 197F, 297F, 397F, 497F, 597F, 697F. Directed Research and Study.

Restricted to second- and third-year students. Individual research conducted under standards promulgated by the dean. The completed work must be approved by the supervising faculty member. For each semester hour of credit earned, one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Approval of research project by the supervising faculty member and by the associate dean for academic affairs.

LAW 197P, 297P, 397P, 497P, 597P, 697P, 797P, 897P, 997P. Internship Program.

Internship under the supervision of a faculty member. Internship hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Offered on the pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Varies with topic.

LAW 297R, 397R, 497R. Nonprofit/Government Internship.

Field placement in a public service organization. Internship hours to be arranged. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.

LAW 198J, 298J, 398J, 498J. Judicial Internship Program.

Internship under the supervision of an individual judge or justice. Individual instruction. Law 197J, 297J, 397J, 497J and 198J, 298J, 398J, 498J may not both be counted. Offered on the pass/fail basis only.