Philosophy Courses

Philosophy: PHL

Lower-Division Courses

PHL 301 (TCCN: PHIL 1301). Introduction to Philosophy.

Primarily for lower-division students. A survey of principal topics and problems in areas such as ethics, theory of knowledge, and philosophy of religion. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 301 and 610QA may not both be counted.

PHL 301K (TCCN: PHIL 2316). Ancient Philosophy.

Same as Classical Civilization 304C (Topic 6). Primarily for lower-division students. An introduction to the philosophical achievements of the ancient world, concentrating on Plato and Aristotle. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Classical Civilization 304C (Topic: Ancient Philosophy), 304C (Topic 6), Philosophy 301K.

PHL 301L. Early Modern Philosophy.

Primarily for lower-division students. An introduction to the philosophical achievements of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, concentrating on such figures as Descartes, Hume, and Kant. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 302. World Philosophy.

Primarily for lower-division students. Basic issues of philosophy in Western and non-Western traditions, such as the nature of philosophy, its relation to religion and science, the self, knowledge, and virtue. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 302C. Ethics and Enlightenment.

Primarily for lower-division students. A study of non-Western ethics, especially in Hindu and Buddhist traditions. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 303. Human Nature.

Primarily for lower-division students. Theories of human nature, such as those of Plato, Christianity, Marxism, and existentialism. Modern psychological and biological theories are included, as the interplay of nature and nurture in determining human conduct is explored. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 303M. Mind and Body.

Primarily for lower-division students. Introduction to philosophical issues about the nature of mind and its relation to body: What is mind? Do people have free will? How does psychology relate to neuroscience? Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 304. Contemporary Moral Problems.

Primarily for lower-division students. Philosophical examination of selected moral problems arising out of contemporary society and culture. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 305 (TCCN: PHIL 2321). Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion.

Same as Core Texts and Ideas 310 (Topic 3) and Religious Studies 305. A critical examination of various conceptions of God and of the relationship of the human and the divine. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Core Texts and Ideas 310 (Topic: Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion), 310 (Topic 3), Philosophy 305, Religious Studies 305.

PHL 306. Philosophical Thinkers.

Primarily for lower-division students. An introduction to major areas of philosophy through the study of selected philosophical thinkers. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

PHL 310. Knowledge and Reality.

An introduction to basic issues in epistemology and metaphysics. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 310 and 610QA may not both be counted.

PHL 610Q. Problems of Knowledge and Valuation.

Restricted to students in the Plan II Honors Program. Methods and aims of selected sciences, arts, and philosophy in the attainment of knowledge and in providing the basis for valuation. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for two semesters. Philosophy 301 and 610QA may not both be counted; Philosophy 310 and 610QA may not both be counted; Philosophy 610QB and 318 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: For 610QA, admission to the Plan II Honors Program; for 610QB, Philosophy 610QA.

PHL 311. Argument.

Argument as a kind of discourse: deductive and inductive arguments; principles of reasoning; fallacies; practical applications. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 312 (TCCN: PHIL 2303). Introduction to Logic.

Logical structure of sentences and arguments; elementary symbolic methods; applications. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with prior credit for Philosophy 313, 313K, 313Q, or 344K.

PHL 313. Introductory Symbolic Logic.

Introduction to symbolic logic (through first-order predicate logic); interpretations; formal proofs, consistency; some practical applications. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Philosophy 313, 313K, 313Q.

PHL 313K. Logic, Sets, and Functions.

Sets, relations, functions, sentential and predicate logic, proof techniques, algorithms, and elementary metatheory. Mathematically oriented. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Philosophy 313, 313K, 313Q.

PHL 313Q. Logic and Scientific Reasoning.

Introduction to formal proofs, semantics, quantifiers, inductive methods, decision theory, and scientific reasoning. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Philosophy 313, 313K, 313Q. Philosophy 313Q and Tutorial Course 310 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Admission to the Plan II Honors Program.

PHL 315F. Philosophy and Film.

Formulation, analysis, and criticism of philosophical ideas in selected films. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 315L. Philosophy and Literature.

Formulation, analysis, and criticism of philosophical ideas in selected works of literature. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 316K. Science and Philosophy.

Introduction to scientific method, including discussion of the nature and goals of science. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. May not be counted by students with credit for Philosophy 363.

PHL 317K. Introduction to the Philosophy of the Arts.

Classic issues in the philosophy of art and beauty, illustrated from the fine arts and contemporary media: literature, drama, music, painting, film, and television. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 318 (TCCN: PHIL 2306). Introduction to Ethics.

Study of basic principles of the moral life, with critical examination of traditional and contemporary theories of the nature of goodness, happiness, duty, and freedom. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 610QB and 318 may not both be counted.

PHL 318K (TCCN: PHIL 2307). Introduction to Political Philosophy.

Views of major political philosophers on humanity, nature, and society; discussions of contemporary political ideologies. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 119S, 219S, 319S, 419S, 519S, 619S, 719S, 819S, 919S. Topics in Philosophy.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Philosophy. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Upper-Division Courses

PHL 321K. Theory of Knowledge.

Systematic and detailed study of major issues in the theory of knowledge, such as the distinction between knowledge and belief, the criteria of knowledge, the justification of knowledge-claims, and perception. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 322. Science and the Modern World.

The historical development and impact of scientific ideas through the modern period to the present. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 322K. History of Ethics.

Survey of ethical theories from ancient times through the nineteenth century. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: At least three semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 323K. Metaphysics.

Problems of substance, change, categories of being, mind, body, space and time, approached either systematically or historically. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 323M. Philosophy of Mind.

Problems concerning the nature of mind and mental phenomena: the relation between mind and body, knowledge of other minds, the computational model of mind, mental causation, intentionality, and consciousness. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 323S. Philosophy of Science.

Examine philosophical issues pertaining to science, with an emphasis on the metaphysics and epistemology of science. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Philosophy 323S and Philosophy 363L (Topic: Philosophy of Science) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 325D. Environmental Ethics and Philosophy.

Examine moral issues concerning the relation of human beings to the environment, including biodiversity, resource depletion, and animal rights. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 325C and 325D may not both be counted.

PHL 325E. Biomedical Ethics.

Apply ethics to problems of medical practice and theory including abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, psychosurgery, genetic engineering, and concepts of health, cure, insanity, and death. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 325E and 325M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 325J. Health and Justice.

Same as Health and Society 341. Examines ethical, political, and legal issues surrounding medicine, society, and healthcare. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Philosophy 325J, 365 (Topic: Health and Justice), Health and Society 341. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 325K. Ethical Theories.

Major traditional and contemporary ethical theories discussed and critically examined. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 325L. Business, Ethics, and Public Policy.

Issues in ethics and politics that are relevant to the organization of business and industry and the distribution of power in society; topics include the role of industry; concepts of profit, property, and moral responsibility. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 325M. Medicine, Ethics, and Society.

Examine moral, legal, and socio-political implications of developments in the biomedical sciences. Explore health and disease, function and normalcy, evidence-based practice, gene editing and cloning, genetic testing, screening, and counseling, public health and compulsory vaccination. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 325E and 325M may not both be counted.

PHL 325N. Organizational Ethics.

Same as Human Dimensions of Organizations 325N. Examine the practical and theoretical aspects of ethical issues in organizations, including philosophical, psychological, anthropological, and strategic approaches. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Human Dimensions of Organizations 325N, Philosophy 325N, 365 (Topic: Organizational Ethics). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 328. Nineteenth-Century Philosophy.

Major figures in nineteenth-century European philosophy, including Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Mill. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 329C. Plato and His Philosophy.

Same as Classical Civilization 348E. Intensive study of selected works by Plato. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Classical Civilization 348 (Topic: Plato), 348E, Philosophy 329C, 329M (Topic: Plato). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 329K. History of Ancient Philosophy.

Same as Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 4). Development of Western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the early Christian era; emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Classical Civilization 348 (Topic 4) and Philosophy 329K may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 329L. Early Modern Philosophy: Descartes to Kant.

Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 329P. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.

An intensive study of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, focusing especially on his Copernican Revolution, his theories of categories and concepts, and his rejection of metaphysics. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 329M (Topic 1) and 329P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and at least three semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 129S, 229S, 429S, 529S, 629S, 729S, 829S, 929S. Topics in Philosophy.

This course is used to record credit the student earns while enrolled at another institution in a program administered by the University's Study Abroad Office. Credit is recorded as assigned by the study abroad adviser in the Department of Philosophy. University credit is awarded for work in an exchange program; it may be counted as coursework taken in residence. Transfer credit is awarded for work in an affiliated studies program. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

PHL 329U. Perspectives on Science and Mathematics.

An examination of five notable episodes in the history of science: Galileo's conflict with the Catholic Church, Isaac Newton's formulation of the laws of motion, Charles Darwin's proposal of the theory of evolution by natural selection, the development of the atomic bomb, and the discovery of the double helix structure of DNA. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: History 329U, 366N (Topic: Perspectives on Science and Mathematics), Philosophy 329U. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and consent of instructor.

PHL 332. Philosophy of Language.

Contemporary theories of meaning and linguistic structure, and their relationships to epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Six semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 332M. Interpretation and Meaning.

Examine issues concerning the nature of communication, interpretation, and meaning. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Philosophy 327 (Topic: Interpretation and Meaning), 327 (Topic 4), 332M. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 334M. Martin Heidegger.

Examine the work of Martin Heidegger, focusing especially on his views concerning truth, art, history, humanism, and technology. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Philosophy 334K (Topic: Martin Heidegger) and 334M may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of coursework in Philosophy.

PHL 342. Political Philosophy.

Critical examination of leading theories of the state, including analysis of such concepts as sovereignty, obligation, rights, and freedom. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

Topic 1: Natural Law Theory. Same as Government 335D. Study of the fundamental moral principles that are built into the design of human nature and lie at the roots of conscience. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Government 335D, 335M (Topic: Natural Law Theory), 335M (Topic 12), and Philosophy 342 (Topic: Natural Law Theory), Philosophy 342 (Topic 1). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing and six semester hours of lower-division coursework in government.

PHL 342L. Origins of Liberalism.

Same as Core Texts and Ideas 331. Examine the theory of liberal democracy through a study of its development in historical, religious, and political contexts. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Core Texts and Ideas 331, 335 (Topic: Origins of Liberalism), 335 (Topic 4), European Studies 346 (Topic: Origins of Liberalism), Philosophy 342L, 354 (Topic: Origins of Liberalism), 354 (Topic 5). Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 342M. Marx and Marxist Theory.

Same as Core Texts and Ideas 335M, European Studies 346 (Topic 30), and History 332R. Introduction to the writings of Karl Marx as well as to those of his intellectual successors in Europe and around the globe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Core Texts and Ideas 335 (Topic: Marx and Western Marxism), 335M, European Studies 346 (Topic: Marx and Western Marxism), 346 (Topic 30), History 332R, 362G (Topic: Marx and Western Marxism), Philosophy 334K (Topic: Marx and Western Marxism), 342M. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 342P. Four Modern Political Theories.

Examine four modern political theories (classical liberalism, Marxism, social democracy, and traditional conservativism), with close reading and analysis of central texts. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 342 (Topic: Four Mdrn Politi Philosophy) and 342P may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 342R. Philosophy of Race and Gender.

Examine philosophical issues pertaining to race and gender. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Philosophy 327 (Topic: Philosophy of Race and Gender) and Philosophy 342R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 344K. Intermediate Symbolic Logic.

Same as Mathematics 344K. A second-semester course in symbolic logic: formal syntax and semantics, basic metatheory (soundness, completeness, compactness, and Loewenheim-Skolem theorems), and further topics in logic. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Philosophy 313, 313K, or 313Q.

PHL 344M. Philosophy of Mathematics.

Philosophical issues concerning mathematics and its foundations, such as the correlation of mathematics to logic, mathematical truth, and mathematical knowledge. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

PHL 346K. Aesthetics.

The nature and purpose of art and the aesthetic experience. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Philosophy 346 and 346K may not both be counted.

PHL 347. Philosophy of Law.

The significance and function of law in political and ethical contexts; comparison of common and statutory to scientific and moral law; readings from among Plato, Kant, Hegel, Bentham, Austin, Hart, Dworkin, Feinberg, and others. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 349. History of Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy.

Philosophical thought from Augustine through Cusanus and Vico, with emphasis on its cultural bearing. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Three semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

PHL 356C. Contemporary Christian Philosophy.

Study of recent work in philosophy written from a Christian point of view or that examines philosophical questions that arise within the framework of the Christian faith. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Philosophy 327 (Topic: Contemporary Christian Philosophy), 327 (Topic: 2), 356C. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 356D. History of Christian Philosophy.

Same as Core Texts and Ideas 335C. Examines the history of Christian philosophy through classic Christian thought, concerning what can be known and how people should live. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Core Texts and Ideas 335 (Topic: History of Christian Philosophy), 335 (Topic 2), 335C, Philosophy 354 (Topic: History of Christian Philosophy), 354 (Topic 2), 356D. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 358. Philosophical Logic.

Issues in philosophical logic and its applications, such as theories of meaning, logical paradoxes, epistemic logic, deontic logic, modal logic, existence, and identity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Philosophy 313, 313K, or 313Q.

PHL 361K. Philosophy in Literature.

Formulation, analysis, and criticism of philosophical ideas in selected literary works. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

PHL 363. Scientific Method.

History, exposition, and analysis of such fundamental concepts in the natural and social sciences as explanation, prediction, discovery, confirmation, laws, hypotheses, theories. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

PHL 363L. Topics in Philosophy of Science.

Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Additional hours may be required for some topics. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 1: The Philosophy of Biology. Philosophy 363L (Topic 1) and 363L (Topic: Philosophy of Biology) may not both be counted.
Topic 2: The Outer Limits of Reason. Examines fundamental questions that appear to transcend the capacities of reason such as semantic paradoxes, theseus' ship, vagueness, infinities, computational intractability, quantum mechanics, fine-tuning arguments, and why mathematics applies to the physical world. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Philosophy 363L (Topic: Outer Limits of Reason) and 363L (Topic 2) may not both be counted.

PHL 365. Selected Problems in Philosophy.

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Varies with the topic.

Topic 2: Introduction to Cognitive Science. Same as Cognitive Science 360 (Topic 1) and Linguistics 373P. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Cognitive Science 360 (Topic 1), Linguistics 373 (Topic 7), 373P, Philosophy 365 (Topic 2). Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topic 6: Process Philosophy and Pragmatism. Philosophy 365 (Topic: Process Philosophy and Pragmatism) and 365 (Topic 6) may not both be counted. Additional prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

PHL 366K. Existentialism.

Existentialism and its relationship to literature, psychoanalysis, and Marxism. Three lecture hours or two lecture hours and one laboratory/discussion hour a week for one semester.

PHL 375M. Major Seminar.

Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of coursework in philosophy.

Topic 1: Philosophy and Feminism. Only one of the following may be counted: Philosophy 327 (Topic: Philosophy and Feminism), 375M (Topic: Philosophy and Feminism), 375M (Topic 1), Women's and Gender Studies 345 (Topic: Philosophy and Feminism).

PHL 679H. Honors Tutorial Course.

Supervised individual reading for one semester, followed by research and writing to produce a substantial paper on a special topic in philosophy, to be completed during the second semester. Conference course for two semesters. Prerequisite: For 679HA, admission to the Philosophy Honors Program; for 679HB, Philosophy 679HA.

PHL 379K. Conference Course.

Intensive tutorial study of selected problems in philosophy. Conference course. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Nine semester hours of upper-division coursework in philosophy and consent of instructor and the undergraduate adviser in philosophy.

Graduate Courses

PHL 380. Contemporary Philosophy.

Past topics include pragmatism; postmodernism; contemporary Marxism; critical theory. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 381. History of Philosophy.

Past topics include major figures and movements in ancient, medieval, early modern, and nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 382. Metaphysics.

Past topics include basic issues in metaphysics; particulars and universals; identity and individuation; realism and antirealism; mind-body issues. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 383. Theory of Knowledge.

Past topics include basic issues in epistemology; theories of belief and rationality; justification and truth. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 383C. Introduction to Cognitive Science.

Same as Cognitive Science 380 (Topic 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science), Linguistics 392 (Topic 1: Introduction to Cognitive Science), and Psychology 394U (Topic 3: Introduction to Cognitive Science). Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Cognitive Science 380 (Topic 1), Linguistics 392 (Topic 1), 393 (Topic: Introduction to Cognitive Science), 393 (Topic: Topics in Cognitive Science), Philosophy 383 (Topic: Introduction to Cognitive Science), 383C, Psychology 394U (Topic 3). Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHL 384F. First-Year Seminar.

Central problems in philosophy. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy, or graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 384K. The Analytic Tradition.

A selective examination of works by major figures such as Frege, Moore, Russell, and Wittgenstein. Three hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHL 385. Theory of Value.

Past topics include basic issues in value theory; the objectivity of value; literature and philosophy; philosophy of art; literary criticism. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 386. Philosophy of Science.

Past topics include basic issues in the philosophy of science; theories and explanations; philosophy of quantum mechanics; philosophy of the social sciences. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 387. Ethical, Political, and Legal Philosophy.

Past topics include contemporary ethical theory; theories of justice; philosophy of law; social contract theories; political philosophy. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 188, 388. Conference Course.

Mainly a reading course in the works of classical and modern philosophers. For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one lecture hour a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 388C. Prospectus Course.

Mainly a reading course for development of a dissertation prospectus. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 389. Logic.

Rigorous definitions of syntax and semantics. Proofs of soundness and completeness of sentential and predicate logics; other topics in metatheory. May include extensions of and alternatives to classical logic. Philosophical significance of logic and metalogical results. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 391. Logic and Philosophy.

Past topics include identity and substitutivity; philosophy of logic; discourse representation. Three hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 394K. Philosophy of Language.

Same as Linguistics 394K. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Only one of the following may be counted: Linguistics 393S (Topic: Philosophy of Language), 394K, Philosophy 391 (Topic: Philosophy of Language), 394K. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

PHL 396W. Dissertation Seminar.

Restricted to doctoral students in philosophy. Intensive examination of selected dissertation topics: attention to research methods, presentation, structure, and argument. Student reports on current research. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 698. Thesis.

The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for two semesters. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: For 698A, graduate standing in philosophy, twelve semester hours of upper-division or graduate coursework in philosophy, and consent of the graduate adviser; for 698B, Philosophy 698A.

PHL 398R. Master's Report.

Preparation of a report to fulfill the requirement for the master's degree under the report option. The equivalent of three lecture hours a week for one semester. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in philosophy and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 398T. Supervised Teaching in Philosophy.

Teaching experience developed through an apprentice relationship between student and faculty member. Three hours a week for one semester. Students may register for this course as many as four times, but only three semester hours of credit in this course may be applied toward a graduate degree. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the graduate adviser.

PHL 399W, 699W, 999W. Dissertation.

May be repeated for credit. Offered on the credit/no credit basis only. Prerequisite: Admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

Professional Courses